How competitive is biomedicine? Watch

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Heidi
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I'm thinking about ringing up Ucas so that I can add two more choices to my application. I originally applied to only 4, which were all for medicine. I already got rejected by 2 med skools I know I still have 2 more chances, but I still feel that i should fill up my two blank choices. So if I get rejected by my 2 other med skools, I'm thinking about reapplying to med skool after doing a 3 yr biomed course. I was also thinking about doing genetics but I don't know. So anyway, back to my question. How competetive is biomedicine? And how competetive is genetics? What are GEP programmes?
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sash37uk
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Hi, i did the same, i applied for two Medical Biochemistry courses just as a backup at Bham and Leicester.

It is quite competitive, but if you write a good personal statement there is no reason why the should reject you. In my personal statement, i talked non stop about why i wanted to do medicine and about my wk exp, but i still got offers for both the biochemistry courses.

Also this course is one of the offers that can let you go into medicine after getting the degree!
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Muse
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(Original post by Heidi)
I'm thinking about ringing up Ucas so that I can add two more choices to my application. I originally applied to only 4, which were all for medicine. I already got rejected by 2 med skools I know I still have 2 more chances, but I still feel that i should fill up my two blank choices. So if I get rejected by my 2 other med skools, I'm thinking about reapplying to med skool after doing a 3 yr biomed course.
You can always apply via clearing if you don't get an offer for a medicine course. I wouldn't be too pessimistic yet though, you've still got a good chance of getting an offer, it's just unfortunate your first two replies had to come back unsuccessful.


(Original post by Heidi)
I was also thinking about doing genetics but I don't know. So anyway, back to my question. How competetive is biomedicine? And how competetive is genetics? What are GEP programmes?
biomedicine isn't competitive. if you get the sort of grades required for medicine offers, obtaining a place on a biomedical science course via clearing shouldn't be a problem.

you should know, however, that applying for medicine after doing another degree is MUCH more competitive than applying as a school leaver.

GEP is the graduate entry programme, and is basically the route graduates can choose to enter medicine.

Fluffy is the resident expert on the GEP programme, so it may be worth waiting til she replies / reads the thread (she did her DPhil on the GEP applications procedure :eek: )
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Heidi
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Thanks guys for ur quick responses
I'm thinking about applying to UEA for biomedicine and University of Leeds for a Biochemistry-Genetics course. I know that it is too early to think that there is no hope in getting a place. But there is still a high chance of getting rejected by all your choices. I'm just scared that I might not go to uni at all this yr and get rejected by all my places. Therefore I was thinking about adding 2 more choices to my uni application. I really do hate thinking about applying to other courses cos all I wanna do is medicine.
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Muse
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(Original post by Heidi)
Thanks guys for ur quick responses
I'm thinking about applying to UEA for biomedicine and University of Leeds for a Biochemistry-Genetics course. I know that it is too early to think that there is no hope in getting a place. But there is still a high chance of getting rejected by all your choices. I'm just scared that I might not go to uni at all this yr and get rejected by all my places. Therefore I was thinking about adding 2 more choices to my uni application. I really do hate thinking about applying to other courses cos all I wanna do is medicine.
If I was in your position and went on to get all rejections, I would work hard to get top marks in the A-Levels in the summer, take a gap year, do lots of work experience relevant to medicine and re-apply.

Going the graduate route into medicine is VERY COMPETITIVE, maybe more so than you realise. You could well end up with a degree you don't want and could have wasted 3 years of your life. You've already said you don't want to do the course, so do you think that would motivate you enough to get a 1st class honours degree?
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Heidi
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I know that the graduate route is way more competetive than the route after A levels. The thing is that I am also considered an international/EU sudent which means that it is probably even more competetive for me, cos most med skools only offer about 15-20 places for international students . If I were to do a 3 year course and apply to med skool after that, I would be considered an UK student, and therefore would have a higher chance of getting in. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe it would not be as diff. or as expensive to get into medicine the graduate route. My situation is a bit more complicated. Even I'm confused about it. I would love to take a gap year but what if I don't get into med skool after my gap yr. Cos the odds of getting in are very poor for international students.

Also I think I wouldn't really mind doing either biomedicine or biochemistry/genetics cos I do think I would enjoy these courses. But I still thnk that medicine is my utmost desire.

Timeofyourlife have u applied for medicine? Have u received any offers yet and where have u applied?

(Original post by timeofyourlife)
If I was in your position and went on to get all rejections, I would work hard to get top marks in the A-Levels in the summer, take a gap year, do lots of work experience relevant to medicine and re-apply.

Going the graduate route into medicine is VERY COMPETITIVE, maybe more so than you realise. You could well end up with a degree you don't want and could have wasted 3 years of your life. You've already said you don't want to do the course, so do you think that would motivate you enough to get a 1st class honours degree?
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Fluffy
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Biomed is no where as competative as medicine, but is becoming more so year on year as people choose biomedical sciences as a lead in to medicine as a second degree.

For this reason also, graduate entry will become more and more competative (both GEP and 5 year courses), with the steady increase in applicants having to go somewhere (non-medical first degree) driving the entry requirements up for graduate students, both in terms of degree classification and in terms of A-Levels requirements being employed by medical schools for graduates (SGHMS expect graduate applicants to their 5 year course to have ABB minimum at A-Level in addition to a 2i) and making a mockery of this valuable access to medicine route.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
Fluffy is the resident expert on the GEP programme, so it may be worth waiting til she replies / reads the thread (she did her DPhil on the GEP applications procedure :eek: )
I wish I had - it might have been less painful Actually I'm sure the SAPK pathways play an important role in the physiological response to med school application stress!!!
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Fluffy
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(Original post by Heidi)
I'm thinking about reapplying to med skool after doing a 3 yr biomed course. I was also thinking about doing genetics but I don't know. So anyway, back to my question. How competetive is biomedicine? And how competetive is genetics? What are GEP programmes?
I would retake as suggested if needs be, or apply after a gap if you get good grades and no offer.

as for choice of degree I would opt for genetics over bio-med sciences. Sure bio-med Sci will help more with the basic sciences you cover in the first year of a medicine degree, but year on year the numbers of graduate applicants with BMS degrees increases as those with single subject degrees (genetics, anatomy, physiology, biochem) decrease (info from 2 sources - both admissions officers at well know med schools).

Basically everyone is starting to apply as clones. Make your application different and apply with a pure subject degree. You will stand out more and anything that makes an UCAS form stand out above others is a good thing!

PS - Apparently admissions officers and interviewers love anatomy degrees, and will probably be the most helpful degree you could do in order to stand out from the crowd and in terms of giving yourself a head statr in medicine.

PPS - Good luck with whatever you decide!
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Muse
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(Original post by Heidi)
Timeofyourlife have u applied for medicine? Have u received any offers yet and where have u applied?
I'm a 2nd year.

(Original post by Fluffy)
PS - Apparently admissions officers and interviewers love anatomy degrees, and will probably be the most helpful degree you could do in order to stand out from the crowd and in terms of giving yourself a head statr in medicine.
Yep, I've heard that before as well. Have you still got that link to the GEP website you posted a while ago? I know NikNak wants to go the graduate-entry route so it may be useful for a few others as well.
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Fluffy
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http://www.freewebs.com/graduatemedicine/
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Muse
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(Original post by Fluffy)
http://www.freewebs.com/graduatemedicine/
Thank you. I've done a bit of PM advertising

Do you know whether intercalated degrees and pre-medicine BSc degrees are considered differently when applying for PRHO jobs?

Edit: it's not a forum before some over-eager mod gives me warning points..
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Fluffy
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From consultants I've spoken to, a relevant pre-med BSc carries more clought than an intercalated one, but up until now, they're not that common. Will be interesting to see what happens as we deviants flood the medicine market! I guess everyone wil need to intercalate or they'll be a three tier system in oporation upon graduation.
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Muse
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(Original post by Fluffy)
From consultants I've spoken to, a relevant pre-med BSc carries more clought than an intercalated one
why so? they are the same degree after all..
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Fluffy
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
why so? they are the same degree after all..
But they're not! 1 year verses 3 years of study. Most BScs have split finals - i.e. at the end of year two and year three, where by intercalated BSc's tend to *just* be the final year. If the iBSc involved doing two years of study in one year (doubling up on part two and part three lectures) then they would be equal.

Kinda like the difference between doing a PhD or an MD as a medical doc - PhD = 3 years of study, MD = 2 years. MD's kinda have a bit of stigma attached in the world of scientific research whereas they're probably fine for giving you the edge in a pure medicial career.
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Muse
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(Original post by Fluffy)
But they're not! 1 year verses 3 years of study. Most BScs have split finals - i.e. at the end of year two and year three, where by intercalated BSc's tend to *just* be the final year. If the iBSc involved doing two years of study in one year (doubling up on part two and part three lectures) then they would be equal.
but i thought you'd get exactly the same degree title as someone who did the traditional 3 year course? and it's not as if it's all condensed into one year, there are modules in the pre-clinicals related to the BSc and surely the finals are just as 'hard'.. :confused:

with the MD and PhD, at least they're differentiated by degree name..
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Fluffy
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
but i thought you'd get exactly the same degree title as someone who did the traditional 3 year course? and it's not as if it's all condensed into one year, there are modules in the pre-clinicals related to the BSc and surely the finals are just as 'hard'.. :confused:

with the MD and PhD, at least they're differentiated by degree name..

No - we had intercalators from Cardiff in my BSc time. They just did the final year. You do get the same degree title as far as I am aware, but the give away is when you apply for anything - your cv tells all
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Muse
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(Original post by Fluffy)
your cv tells all
well i'm hoping you'll be off having babies and the like so I can steal your registrar post..
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Fluffy
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babies? I can't be trusted with babies - I'd probably lose them!
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randdom
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You don't need to apply now, if you do get rejected from all you application which hopefully you won't and you decide you want to do the graduate route then you can apply with ucas to more places as soon as your final rejection comes through. I wish I could remeber what it was called but my friend did it last year. You get to alter you PS and apply to unis 1 at a time untill you get an offer.
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