Justforbantsss
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#1
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#1
Hi I just recently changed my mind about doing medicine this summer and have decided to pursue law . I’m going into year 13 this year and was wondering what unis are really good for law given that this was last minute. However I do have work experience for law and I do bio chem and history for a levels. I also have high predictions but what else should I do to maximise my chances to get into a really good law school. Like what should I include in my personal statement and books I should read.
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University of East Anglia UG Student Rep: Leah
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#2
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(Original post by Justforbantsss)
Hi I just recently changed my mind about doing medicine this summer and have decided to pursue law . I’m going into year 13 this year and was wondering what unis are really good for law given that this was last minute. However I do have work experience for law and I do bio chem and history for a levels. I also have high predictions but what else should I do to maximise my chances to get into a really good law school. Like what should I include in my personal statement and books I should read.
Hi OP,

I am a current law student at the University of East Anglia, and I'd like to share some thoughts that may be useful for you.

There is some stigma out there that you have to go to Oxbridge or at least a Russell group university in order to pursue a good career in law, but this is simply not true. The sector is constantly expanding and more and more graduates from a wider range of Law schools are going on to fill highly competitive roles. Therefore, I would say finding the Law school that bests suits you is more important than going to the most 'prestigious' university.

Here at UEA Law we have a number of services and features that are worth considering. For example, we have a dedicated careers and employability team, both for the university as a whole and a separate team just for the Law school. These are people that can give specific support to help find placement and work opportunities, assist with application processes and offer frequent employability workshops and events. Additionally, we have a great Pro Bono Law Clinic that allows varied opportunities for students to get involved with real life legal volunteer work ranging across numerous areas of legal practice, from family to immigration to criminal justice. UEA also stands out when it comes to its available optional modules. With unique options such as medical law, animal welfare law and media and internet law, there is bound to be something to suit your interests. Furthermore, there is also the chance in your third year at UEA to study a module from outside of the Law school, allowing students to get involved in other areas of interest such as politics, journalism or history.

When it comes to things you can do to better your application, it sounds like you're already well on the way to having a fab application. Having legal work experience already is a huge advantage and will be a great thing to talk about in your personal statement! This, alongside good A level grades, will put you in great stead to get into some amazing universities.

For personal statements, a key thing to focus on is showing that you have developed the key skills needed for a law degree. To do this I would recommend looking over the webpages for the universities you wish to apply to and identify what things they look for in prospective students. For Law this is often skills such as problem-solving, research, negotiation and analysis. Giving examples of where you have used such skills within your A level subjects, work experience, extra curriculars, etc, is the best way to show you will make a great law student.

If you would like to show further interest, gain some ideas of possible topics or cases of interest you could talk about in your personal statement or just get ahead on some key legal topics, some books I would recommend are -
  • The Rule of Law - Tom Bingham
  • The Secret Barrister
  • Misjustice - Helena Kennedy


I hope this helps!

Leah
UEA Law
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Justforbantsss
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#3
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#3
(Original post by University of East Anglia UG Student Rep: Leah)
Hi OP,

I am a current law student at the University of East Anglia, and I'd like to share some thoughts that may be useful for you.

There is some stigma out there that you have to go to Oxbridge or at least a Russell group university in order to pursue a good career in law, but this is simply not true. The sector is constantly expanding and more and more graduates from a wider range of Law schools are going on to fill highly competitive roles. Therefore, I would say finding the Law school that bests suits you is more important than going to the most 'prestigious' university.

Here at UEA Law we have a number of services and features that are worth considering. For example, we have a dedicated careers and employability team, both for the university as a whole and a separate team just for the Law school. These are people that can give specific support to help find placement and work opportunities, assist with application processes and offer frequent employability workshops and events. Additionally, we have a great Pro Bono Law Clinic that allows varied opportunities for students to get involved with real life legal volunteer work ranging across numerous areas of legal practice, from family to immigration to criminal justice. UEA also stands out when it comes to its available optional modules. With unique options such as medical law, animal welfare law and media and internet law, there is bound to be something to suit your interests. Furthermore, there is also the chance in your third year at UEA to study a module from outside of the Law school, allowing students to get involved in other areas of interest such as politics, journalism or history.

When it comes to things you can do to better your application, it sounds like you're already well on the way to having a fab application. Having legal work experience already is a huge advantage and will be a great thing to talk about in your personal statement! This, alongside good A level grades, will put you in great stead to get into some amazing universities.

For personal statements, a key thing to focus on is showing that you have developed the key skills needed for a law degree. To do this I would recommend looking over the webpages for the universities you wish to apply to and identify what things they look for in prospective students. For Law this is often skills such as problem-solving, research, negotiation and analysis. Giving examples of where you have used such skills within your A level subjects, work experience, extra curriculars, etc, is the best way to show you will make a great law student.

If you would like to show further interest, gain some ideas of possible topics or cases of interest you could talk about in your personal statement or just get ahead on some key legal topics, some books I would recommend are -
  • The Rule of Law - Tom Bingham
  • The Secret Barrister
  • Misjustice - Helena Kennedy


I hope this helps!

Leah
UEA Law
Hi thank you so much Leah for replying. This really has helped me a lot because I thought it was too late. I was wondering for my specific a levels like Biology, chemistry and history how would I incorporate that into my personal statement.
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LawStudent456
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#4
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#4
I don't know what you mean by last minute as the 2022 UCAS cycle hasn't opened yet. If you want to do law then apply for it.

I don't think your law work experience will gain you any advantage, but of course it's still ok to put in your PS so long as you link it back to why you want to study law.

What are your predicted grades and what unis are you thinking of?
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Joleee
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#5
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may i ask why you've had such a radical shift in interest? like, you know studying law is nothing like studying medicine; and, while i do love it, you may find it incredibly boring which isn't completely uncommon. if you've never studied law before i would suggest going to the Supreme Court website and open up a few judgments, search for legal textbooks on google scholar, namely books on equity, land law, contract law and constitutional law to start and see if you can see yourself studying that stuff for the next three years. ps if you think you want to study law because you want to work in law you know you don't need a law degree to do so, right?

re personal statements everyone and their dog has used The Rule of Law by Tom Bingham and The Secret Barrister. if you want to stand out from the crowd imho go for something a little more original like books by John Rawls, John Griffith, Richard Posner or Karl Llewellyn.
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Scrooo
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#6
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#6
The reputation of your university is very important in Law. Getting a training contract is extremely competitive and those from RG universities account for nearly 80% of trainees (something like that) at the top firms, and to a lesser extent at some of the regional firms. Yes, firms are trying to be more inclusive, but thats because of how huge the disparities between RG and Non-RG unis are. In my opinion, Nottingham, Bristol, Durham, Leeds, KCL/UCL/LSE, Exeter, Leeds and Manchester are all respected places for Law.

People like to sugarcoat things, but you should aim for one of those universities if you want a shot at getting a good TC. (I may have forgotten to add some unis to that list).
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Joleee
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#7
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#7
yeah yeah, i agree with you. for me the thought is a bit silly :lol: first time i saw someone mention books for a ps on TSR i was like wtf that's a thing, like how do you impress someone cuz you read a book?? :dontknow: (and let's be honest, they didn't actually read the whole book and might only half understand it, but apparently it's common so i just roll with it to prevent people from mentioning Letters to a Law Student ).

ooh, do you remember which cases? :cookie:
Last edited by Joleee; 8 months ago
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LawStudent456
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#8
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(Original post by Scrooo)
The reputation of your university is very important in Law. Getting a training contract is extremely competitive and those from RG universities account for nearly 80% of trainees (something like that) at the top firms, and to a lesser extent at some of the regional firms. Yes, firms are trying to be more inclusive, but thats because of how huge the disparities between RG and Non-RG unis are. In my opinion, Nottingham, Bristol, Durham, Leeds, KCL/UCL/LSE, Exeter, Leeds and Manchester are all respected places for Law.

People like to sugarcoat things, but you should aim for one of those universities if you want a shot at getting a good TC. (I may have forgotten to add some unis to that list).
You definitely didn't forget to add Leeds.
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University of East Anglia UG Student Rep: Leah
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#9
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(Original post by Justforbantsss)
Hi thank you so much Leah for replying. This really has helped me a lot because I thought it was too late. I was wondering for my specific a levels like Biology, chemistry and history how would I incorporate that into my personal statement.
Hi again,

You'll absolutely want to make sure you mention the A levels you have studied as this is the universal basis that all students will have. In terms of how to incorporate them, I would recommend going for the 'skills' approach. Figure out what the key appropriate skills are that you have gained from each subject or the things you have found most interesting that may have inspired you to study law. For example, science subjects show great problem-solving and analytical skills as you are are having to find answers and apply appropriate methods to the given scenarios. This is very much similar to studying Law where you will be given problem questions and will have to apply the knowledge you learn appropriately. History is a great subject in terms of leading into a law degree as much of a law degree is technically looking at the history of the law. Your writing skills will have developed through doing A level history which are crucial for a law degree and you could use examples of particular interests from your A level to suggest potential areas of interest within the law.

Hope this helps,
Leah
UEA Law
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The University of Law Students
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#10
Report 8 months ago
#10
(Original post by Justforbantsss)
Hi I just recently changed my mind about doing medicine this summer and have decided to pursue law . I’m going into year 13 this year and was wondering what unis are really good for law given that this was last minute. However I do have work experience for law and I do bio chem and history for a levels. I also have high predictions but what else should I do to maximise my chances to get into a really good law school. Like what should I include in my personal statement and books I should read.
Hi Justforbantss

Leah the rep above gives some great advice. I had studied psychology and went onto study law so I focused on the skills aspect in my application form, so for example, I talked about how I manage my time, how I can work under pressure, how I work in a team as well individually and the types of work that I have done (e.g. presentations, speaking in public, report writing, article writing etc).

I also talked about why I knew a career in law was right for me (so examples that I had seen, court visits I had made, people that I had come into contact with) and what my career plans were (so at the time I wanted to be a solicitor so I talked about the route I was taking academically so that I could show I understood what was involved).

The other thing that I mentioned was the support of my friends and family and how I would manage my studies because law is tough and it is important to have a good support network or ways of dealing with stress (so hobbies are great for illustrating this too).

I didn't mention books that I had read in my personal statement but it is good to start reading some of those suggested, simply because it will widen your understanding of issues in law and may start to influence your opinion on different practice areas, which will be something that you will need to consider towards the end of your degree.

After your degree, you will also need to consider whether you will take the solicitor or barrister route. Have a listen to the podcasts here so that you get an idea of the different practice areas and careers: https://www.law.ac.uk/resources/podcasts/

Hope that helps!

Nic
Student Ambassador at the University of Law
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