Being a diplomat

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rasharasharasha
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#1
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Hi! I just started my A Levels and I'm doing maths, biology, chemistry and possibly psychology (I'm doing english lit atm but I may be switching to psychology) Would these a levels be helpful for going to university and things? I want to study law and eventually become a diplomat (hopefully I'm not aiming too high there), should I go with these options or stay with them?
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artful_lounger
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#2
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Your A-level subjects are fine for studying law. However only 3 A-levels are required or even recommended, and unis do not award "bonus points" to those taking 4 A-levels so there is literally zero reason to do so (and considerable reason to not do so, as you risk getting more mediocre grades across 4 subjects instead of excellent grades in 3).

Also for what it's worth you don't need to study law to be a diplomat and it's not any better than studying anything else. In fact since law has a relatively low percentage of 1st class degree results it's probably a worse choice for anything except going into law (for which I would note, it is also not strictly required to do an undergrad law degree), unless you have vested interests in the subject area aside from thinking it will get you into the diplomatic service.
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rasharasharasha
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#3
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#3
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Your A-level subjects are fine for studying law. However only 3 A-levels are required or even recommended, and unis do not award "bonus points" to those taking 4 A-levels so there is literally zero reason to do so (and considerable reason to not do so, as you risk getting more mediocre grades across 4 subjects instead of excellent grades in 3).

Also for what it's worth you don't need to study law to be a diplomat and it's not any better than studying anything else. In fact since law has a relatively low percentage of 1st class degree results it's probably a worse choice for anything except going into law (for which I would note, it is also not strictly required to do an undergrad law degree), unless you have vested interests in the subject area aside from thinking it will get you into the diplomatic service.
Thanks for the reply! My college makes us choose 4 a levels for the first year (but lets us drop one if we'd like) so that's why I have 4. I've been interested in law for a long time now, I've been thinking about it for years but always thought that I HAD to be a doctor
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by rasharasharasha)
Thanks for the reply! My college makes us choose 4 a levels for the first year (but lets us drop one if we'd like) so that's why I have 4. I've been interested in law for a long time now, I've been thinking about it for years but always thought that I HAD to be a doctor
There are other alternatives to law or medicine for degrees and professions...especially if you wanted to become a diplomat there are all sorts of interesting languages degrees, or subjects like anthropology which would likely be very interesting and also relevant to working as a diplomat (on some level anyway - more so than law I should think).
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rasharasharasha
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#5
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
There are other alternatives to law or medicine for degrees and professions...especially if you wanted to become a diplomat there are all sorts of interesting languages degrees, or subjects like anthropology which would likely be very interesting and also relevant to working as a diplomat (on some level anyway - more so than law I should think).
Yeah, my degree plans are not set in stone yet but they're kind of what I'm interested in. I saw that I can study law then go on to get a masters in international affairs which seems super interesting to me. I might consider anthropology too. Are there any other university courses you recommend exploring?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by rasharasharasha)
Yeah, my degree plans are not set in stone yet but they're kind of what I'm interested in. I saw that I can study law then go on to get a masters in international affairs which seems super interesting to me. I might consider anthropology too. Are there any other university courses you recommend exploring?
Really just about any social science or humanities course, if it strikes your interests. Or STEM course, as your subject options are also suitable for most bioscience courses and some physical science courses (i.e. chemistry or earth sciences mostly). You could become a diplomat with a degree in Egyptology, or Sanskrit,, or linguistics, or economic history, or primatology etc, etc. There are lots of possible options and the diplomatic service do not require any particular first degree subject (except for the economics stream which requires a degree with at least 50% economics content, but that is a fairly specific sub-area of the diplomatic service).

As a side note LSE has a joint honours course in anthropology and law which is a qualifying law degree. It's the only such course offering that combination as a QLD that I know of however.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 9 months ago
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rasharasharasha
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#7
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Really just about any social science or humanities course, if it strikes your interests. Or STEM course, as your subject options are also suitable for most bioscience courses and some physical science courses (i.e. chemistry or earth sciences mostly). You could become a diplomat with a degree in Egyptology, or Sanskrit,, or linguistics, or economic history, or primatology etc, etc. There are lots of possible options and the diplomatic service do not require any particular first degree subject (except for the economics stream which requires a degree with at least 50% economics content, but that is a fairly specific sub-area of the diplomatic service).

As a side note LSE has a joint honours course in anthropology and law which is a qualifying law degree. It's the only such course offering that combination as a QLD that I know of however.
That's helped a lot, I'll definitely start researching some more options now. thank you!
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