Is law easier to get into than medicine?

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lunariumxo
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is law much easier to get into compared to a course like medicine, i saw the entry requirements and yes they require high grades but the LNAT exam seems to be sm easier , they get 92 minutes for 45 questions and it is similar to VR of the ucat which gives you 45 questions for 20 minutes ?
and more unis are generally available for law but i heard what makes law hard is the phase after getting the degree when you need to find firms ?

me and my friend were talking about this so it would be nice to get a few views
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Sophxxxdd
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(Original post by lunariumxo)
is law much easier to get into compared to a course like medicine, i saw the entry requirements and yes they require high grades but the LNAT exam seems to be sm easier , they get 92 minutes for 45 questions and it is similar to VR of the ucat which gives you 45 questions for 20 minutes ?
and more unis are generally available for law but i heard what makes law hard is the phase after getting the degree when you need to find firms ?

me and my friend were talking about this so it would be nice to get a few views
The LNAT is actually really tough and the average is around a 20.5/42 so as you can see even a fail is around average. You should try it out and you will see why..
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username4899406
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Law is like with most careers, if you go to a decent uni and have some experience under your belt via a placement etc you will have a recent chance of getting into a reputable firm
Probably as many hours as medicine at a highly ranked uni / firm though
So not "easier" in terms of the number of hours for sure
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Joleee
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if you mean is law easier to get into academically, then yes absolutely. afaik you need to jump through a lot of hoops to get into medical school including studying specific subjects at A Levels, then admissions tests and interviews. lots of LLBs don't require any of that.

if you mean is it easier to find a job in law than medicine, i doubt it; unless working as the law firm's receptionist counts as working in law. think once you've graduated with a medical degree you will find a job somewhere. becausethenight are you a medical student? what's the job certainty? (sorry if i forgot what you're studying )

(btw OP i amended your thread title so it's clearer for other users what you're asking. if you're hoping for personal advice tho i'll also move it :yy:)
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Reality Check
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(Original post by lunariumxo)
is law much easier to get into compared to a course like medicine, i saw the entry requirements and yes they require high grades but the LNAT exam seems to be sm easier , they get 92 minutes for 45 questions and it is similar to VR of the ucat which gives you 45 questions for 20 minutes ?
and more unis are generally available for law but i heard what makes law hard is the phase after getting the degree when you need to find firms ?

me and my friend were talking about this so it would be nice to get a few views
I agree with the others. Medicine is very difficult to get into university to study, but you are essentially guaranteed a career at the end of it. Law, on the other hand, is much easier to get into university to study, but there are a million-and-one law graduates serving coffee and flipping burgers.

Reading law at university is an academic endeavour, not vocational, and it is absolutely not a ticket into the law as a career - about half of all lawyers have done an undergraduate subject other than law. A law degree needs to be a good degree (i.e II(1) or higher) and from a good university to be any use.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by Joleee)
if you mean is law easier to get into academically, then yes absolutely. afaik you need to jump through a lot of hoops to get into medical school including studying specific subjects at A Levels, then admissions tests and interviews. lots of LLBs don't require any of that.

if you mean is it easier to find a job in law than medicine, i doubt it; unless working as the law firm's receptionist counts as working in law. think once you've graduated with a medical degree you will find a job somewhere. becausethenight are you a medical student? what's the job certainty? (sorry if i forgot what you're studying )

(btw OP i amended your thread title so it's clearer for other users what you're asking. if you're hoping for personal advice tho i'll also move it :yy:)
Yep I am

Medicine basically guarantees you a job when you get on the degree - as long as you complete the degree, which >95% of people who start do, you’ll get a junior doctor job when you graduate. Of course, that may not be the job you want, but you will have a job! Similarly for specialty training you will always be employed but you may take several years of working as a locum-grade and boosting your CV to get into a particular competitive training pathway like surgery.

The more general point though is that these are pretty different careers and I would not pick one based on how easy it is to study at UG level
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lunariumxo
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(Original post by Sophxxxdd)
The LNAT is actually really tough and the average is around a 20.5/42 so as you can see even a fail is around average. You should try it out and you will see why..
i see but i wouldn't really say its any easier to the VR section of ucat i saw a few mock questions on the lnat websites and just wanted to see what the comparison was
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lunariumxo
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(Original post by Joleee)
if you mean is law easier to get into academically, then yes absolutely. afaik you need to jump through a lot of hoops to get into medical school including studying specific subjects at A Levels, then admissions tests and interviews. lots of LLBs don't require any of that.

if you mean is it easier to find a job in law than medicine, i doubt it; unless working as the law firm's receptionist counts as working in law. think once you've graduated with a medical degree you will find a job somewhere. becausethenight are you a medical student? what's the job certainty? (sorry if i forgot what you're studying )

(btw OP i amended your thread title so it's clearer for other users what you're asking. if you're hoping for personal advice tho i'll also move it :yy:)
ahh no i'm set to medicine i was talking about it with my friend group and we kinda debated haha so i wanted to see others view points
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Catherine1973
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Well you can get into law degrees at some places without any tests or particularly good a level grades.

That isn’t true for medicine as far as I can tell.
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Napp
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Depends on the course/university... some will naturally be easier to get into law whilst others might well be exponentially harder.
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looloo2134
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(Original post by WazzWazz98)
Law is like with most careers, if you go to a decent uni and have some experience under your belt via a placement etc you will have a recent chance of getting into a reputable firm
Probably as many hours as medicine at a highly ranked uni / firm though
So not "easier" in terms of the number of hours for sure
(Original post by Joleee)
if you mean is law easier to get into academically, then yes absolutely. afaik you need to jump through a lot of hoops to get into medical school including studying specific subjects at A Levels, then admissions tests and interviews. lots of LLBs don't require any of that.

if you mean is it easier to find a job in law than medicine, i doubt it; unless working as the law firm's receptionist counts as working in law. think once you've graduated with a medical degree you will find a job somewhere. becausethenight are you a medical student? what's the job certainty? (sorry if i forgot what you're studying )

(btw OP i amended your thread title so it's clearer for other users what you're asking. if you're hoping for personal advice tho i'll also move it :yy:)
A receptionist at law firm can if thier a good employee do the vocational route to become a solicitor. To become a solicitor there is non university vocational route but it's very hard to got onto an law apprenticeship.
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hotpud
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(Original post by lunariumxo)
is law much easier to get into compared to a course like medicine, i saw the entry requirements and yes they require high grades but the LNAT exam seems to be sm easier , they get 92 minutes for 45 questions and it is similar to VR of the ucat which gives you 45 questions for 20 minutes ?
and more unis are generally available for law but i heard what makes law hard is the phase after getting the degree when you need to find firms ?

me and my friend were talking about this so it would be nice to get a few views
What is the obsession with law and medicine? All my students want to be doctors or lawyers regardless of the fact they are predicted 4s and 5s. I imagine it is easier to get onto a law degree than medicine but only just. However, once you graduate, that is where the hard part starts. My mate graduated ages ago and only got a read job in the last year or so. If you know someone who works somewhere, it is easy but if you are on your own it is really difficult. The other thing to think about is that most of my students see themselves strutting up and down the bar shouting things like "Objection my lord". The reality is that most legal work is either no-win-no-fee accident claims, house conveyancing or corporate law where you spend hours writing the most unreadable terms and conditions possible.

The second thing I would say is that medicine is a polar opposite of law in terms of job type. Rather than jump one way or the other because of a desire for superficial status, ask yourself what you actually enjoy doing. Are you a team player or loner. Do you like talking or being quiet? Do you like people? Do you like sitting at a desk and focussing or wandering about? That might help you decide the right path to take.

By all means pursue law or medicine, but go into medicine because you want to help people or go into law because you find it interesting. I can't help think most of my students want to tread that path because their families have told them it is the only way to be labelled "successful".

Good luck!
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by looloo2134)
A receptionist at law firm can if thier a good employee do the vocational route to become a solicitor. To become a solicitor there is non university vocational route but it's very hard to got onto an law apprenticeship.
How difficult is it to get onto a Law apprenticeship? As it is something I'm considering.
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looloo2134
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(Original post by rosy_posy)
How difficult is it to get onto a Law apprenticeship? As it is something I'm considering.
If you Google law apprenticeship there a lot information and CLEX route
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by looloo2134)
If you Google law apprenticeship there a lot information and CLEX route
Yes I've already done both of those things. I was asking you bc you were talking about Law so I thought you might know how competitive (or not) Law apprenticeships are.
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AmIReallyHere
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(Original post by hotpud)
What is the obsession with law and medicine? All my students want to be doctors or lawyers regardless of the fact they are predicted 4s and 5s. I imagine it is easier to get onto a law degree than medicine but only just. However, once you graduate, that is where the hard part starts. My mate graduated ages ago and only got a read job in the last year or so. If you know someone who works somewhere, it is easy but if you are on your own it is really difficult. The other thing to think about is that most of my students see themselves strutting up and down the bar shouting things like "Objection my lord". The reality is that most legal work is either no-win-no-fee accident claims, house conveyancing or corporate law where you spend hours writing the most unreadable terms and conditions possible.

The second thing I would say is that medicine is a polar opposite of law in terms of job type. Rather than jump one way or the other because of a desire for superficial status, ask yourself what you actually enjoy doing. Are you a team player or loner. Do you like talking or being quiet? Do you like people? Do you like sitting at a desk and focussing or wandering about? That might help you decide the right path to take.

By all means pursue law or medicine, but go into medicine because you want to help people or go into law because you find it interesting. I can't help think most of my students want to tread that path because their families have told them it is the only way to be labelled "successful".

Good luck!
Money and as you said family feeding them beliefs that it's the only respectable careers around
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looloo2134
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Veterinary medicine and nursing are a lot harder to get into than human medicine. I never understood why people see human medicine as more desirable.
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flamingolover
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(Original post by looloo2134)
Veterinary medicine and nursing are a lot harder to get into than human medicine. I never understood why people see human medicine as more desirable.
Same!! I’m a vet student so I’m a bit biased but I think it’s such a good career and I don’t understand why human medicine is seen as better!
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rosy_posy
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(Original post by flamingolover)
Same!! I’m a vet student so I’m a bit biased but I think it’s such a good career and I don’t understand why human medicine is seen as better!
If I was more of a sciency person I would apply for Vet med. I love animals :emog:
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artful_lounger
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In general yes, although specific law courses may be more competitive than other specific medicine courses (e.g. LSE law vs Cambridge medicine).

However as you noted, the process of actually going into work after you earn your degree is different in each. In medicine provided you pass the degree you are essentially (at the moment) more or less guaranteed an FY1 job somewhere. For law, there is no such guarantee and even doing very well in your degree doesn't necessarily guarantee you a job either. Work experience would be essential to make yourself a competitive candidate for a training contract (and I assume pupillage, although the Bar is slightly more focused on academics I gather) for law students. Also you would need to get together the money for the SQE (and potentially a prep course for it) or the BPTC, the latter of which I think is fairly expensive, and neither of which are eligible for SFE postgrad loans funding. While medicine does have grad exams for doctors, you're essentially guaranteed a paying FY1 job before you need to do those unlike law.

So while for medicine overall the highest barrier to entry to the profession is upfront when applying to the degree, and thereafter there aren't that many major attrition points - although there are some (e.g. applying to specialty training), being unsuccessful at that stage doesn't prevent you still being a doctor, you may just need/want to take go into a different specialty if you are unsuccessful. For law the highest barriers to entry for the profession arguably come after the degree - and there are more attrition points (applying to the law degree, getting a good result in the law degree, applying to TCs/pupillage, paying for and undertaking the SQE/BPTC...) at which individuals can "fail" in their journey to become a practicing lawyer (not necessarily even of their own fault).

That said as noted above if this is part of a decision making process to choose between them, it's a not a good set of criteria to choose between them compared to the many other differences between the very different degrees and professions.
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