hotdeaths
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I am looking at courses offered by some unis - I found one from St. Andrews which is Financial Economics. I also found Financial Economics and Maths. Is there any difference in terms of job accessibility once completing the course? Is the economics and maths course a split (50/50) rather than just 100% economics, or is it the full economics course + additional maths work? I do both for A-Levels so I would be eligible to apply for both if I got sufficient grades, just wondering the pros and cons of each.
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artful_lounger
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Joint honours degrees entail the same number credits as a single honours degree, so you do the same overall amount of work, split between the subjects (the split can vary, usually "X and Y" indicates roughly a 50% split but you may be able to emphasise one side or the other later in the course). Usually this is accomplished by having more limited optional module opportunities and filling in most of the credits with the core modules.

Job prospects will be the same, and mainly will depend on what relevant work experience you get, not what subject(s) you study.
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hotdeaths
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Joint honours degrees entail the same number credits as a single honours degree, so you do the same overall amount of work, split between the subjects (the split can vary, usually "X and Y" indicates roughly a 50% split but you may be able to emphasise one side or the other later in the course). Usually this is accomplished by having more limited optional module opportunities and filling in most of the credits with the core modules.

Job prospects will be the same, and mainly will depend on what relevant work experience you get, not what subject(s) you study.
Ok, thanks. Does this essentially mean the course isn’t as important as the overarching subject? For example, finance bring fairly similar to economics and management, both can be used to become an accountant etc if appropriate work experience is sought.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by hotdeaths)
Ok, thanks. Does this essentially mean the course isn’t as important as the overarching subject? For example, finance bring fairly similar to economics and management, both can be used to become an accountant etc if appropriate work experience is sought.
No, I mean broadly speaking the subject isn't relevant at all. You can become an accountant with a degree in history and politics if you want (I know someone who did just that). The number of roles requiring a specific background is rather small outside of STEM lab based positions. Most jobs including in financial services don't care that much what you studied if you have relevant work experience.
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