robin1123
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Asking because I haven't met a single CS graduate in my life who has interesting opinions, and also I don't know any good artist/writer/filmmaker who started his professional life as coder.

Does working with machines turn people into machines too?
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mqb2766
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(Original post by robin1123)
Asking because I haven't met a single CS graduate in my life who has interesting opinions, and also I don't know any good artist/writer/filmmaker who started his professional life as coder.

Does working with machines turn people into machines too?
You seem to be similarly dismissive of history, english, maths, computing ... studies. Any reason why?
Last edited by mqb2766; 1 month ago
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summerbirdreads
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(Original post by robin1123)
Asking because I haven't met a single CS graduate in my life who has interesting opinions, and also I don't know any good artist/writer/filmmaker who started his professional life as coder.

Does working with machines turn people into machines too?
how many did you meet? 0.2?
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by robin1123)
Asking because I haven't met a single CS graduate in my life who has interesting opinions, and also I don't know any good artist/writer/filmmaker who started his professional life as coder.

Does working with machines turn people into machines too?
Hey Robin1123,

I'm a final year Computer Science student who has just got back from a placement year, where I worked in industry primarily focussed on engineering in the MarTech space, with an emphasis on Web (TypeScript, React, Azure, JAMStack, Next.js, etc.).

I would say that I've had nothing but experience of the opposite - a CS degree has opened the doors to many opportunities across the industry for everyone that I know.

I came to university with a background in programming (games dev), but the degree has allowed me to explore the more technical aspects of CS (Networking, Computer Architecture, Algorithm Design) as well as the softer/business-focussed aspects (Requirements Elicitation, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Usability & Accessibility). Due to what I found interesting on the course, I now know that I want to pursue a graduate role in Web development whilst still getting the opportunity to work with business partners and technical stakeholders to explore and educate on what the best solution is for them.

That's just my experience - I have friends and peers that have done the same degree as me but are now pursuing careers in FinTech, Cyber Security, Digital Forensics, Entrepreneurship, Consultancy and more.

Technology is everywhere, without it graphic designers would not have drawing tablets, writers would not be able to publish their books at scale, and filmmakers wouldn't have digital cameras or editing software. There's a gap in the market for people with experience in CS that have deep experience in one of those areas, perhaps that could be you?

Hope that helps give some insight!
~ Mikael, UoP Student Rep
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