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PGCE Secondary Japanese?

I'm doing BA Japanese right now with thoughts of becoming a Japanese language teacher at a secondary school. There are PGCEs for all the common languages taught in the UK (french, spanish, german) but I haven't found a single PGCE Japanese course in the whole of the country, so I'm guessing such a thing doesn't exist? So how do I train to become a teacher in my field? 🤔
Original post by Yasuda
I'm doing BA Japanese right now with thoughts of becoming a Japanese language teacher at a secondary school. There are PGCEs for all the common languages taught in the UK (french, spanish, german) but I haven't found a single PGCE Japanese course in the whole of the country, so I'm guessing such a thing doesn't exist? So how do I train to become a teacher in my field? 🤔


I'm not aware of any UK state schools that teach Japanese as a GCSE or A-level. That's not to say they don't exist, but I imagine the demand for Japanese teachers is very low, hence there not being a PGCE available for them.

Would you be able to teach French, German or Spanish (or possibly Mandarin?)- did you take any of them at A-level? If so, I would find a PGCE for one of these subjects and explain your interest in teaching Japanese also. I doubt the uni will have a placement school that offers Japanese, but you may be able to run it as a club etc.

Once qualified, it would probably be a case of finding a school you could persuade to start a GCSE course in Japanese. You'd need to teach your other language at KS3, I imagine.

If you *know* a school that teaches Japanese, then get in touch with them- it may be possible to do a schools direct course through them.

However, you need to be aware that being a Japanese teacher at secondary level in the UK is not a common job- and it may be worth exploring other options.
Sorry this is a bit late, but my college provides Japanese courses, but only up to GCSE level, and it was the only one out of my other choices to actually provide it. My teacher's a native and all I know is that she came to the UK and did a bit of studying before becoming a teacher, it was all quite vague. Also, since Japanese is only provided as an extra-curricular, she's kind of a part-time teacher? I can try to ask her when we come back, only if you're still interested.

edit: ah, you said secondary school, sorry! yeah I haven't heard of any either I'm afraid D:
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by Yasuda
I'm doing BA Japanese right now with thoughts of becoming a Japanese language teacher at a secondary school. There are PGCEs for all the common languages taught in the UK (french, spanish, german) but I haven't found a single PGCE Japanese course in the whole of the country, so I'm guessing such a thing doesn't exist? So how do I train to become a teacher in my field? 🤔

It doesn't exist, unfortunately. I'm pretty sure Sheffield used to offer it but had to get rid since the number of schools teaching Japanese is so low.

If you want to do a PGCE in languages, you usually need to have a degree in either Spanish, French, and/or German.
Reply 4
You're probably best going through a SCITT or School's Direct route, where you can train while working 4 days a week at a school who require a trainee teacher for a specific subject like Japanese. A Japanese Studies graduate did just that in the year above me at Uni. Be aware that you may have to move due to the rare opportunities, and you may have to offer a second language, for example, by doing a subject knowledge enhancement course in French or Spanish.

Try looking at Dartford School Direct and The Compton School SCITT.
Hi @Yasuda,
it does exist but they are not many options- there are according to the teacher training tool search- 5 across the country, 4 of which are at Sheffield university. Japanese on its own is not an option, you would need to combine it with either Spanish or French. This second "mainstream" language will increase your employability and as a language teacher ( I am one myself!), it is expected that you teach 2 languages. The second language is never really expected to be on the level of your first one- if you could teach it at key stage 3 and maybe build up your knowledge to eventually deliver it at key stage 4, it would help. Have you got an A-level or even a GCSE in another language?
I think the best course of action at this stage is to contact the institutions offering the courses and have a chat with them. You might be able to start a second language from scratch through a subject enhancement course or boost your pre-existing knowledge.
I would also advise you to register for a teaching adviser with Get into Teaching, all our advisers are experienced teachers and they will help you finding the best course for you. It is a free service.
Laure
Reply 6
Original post by Get into Teaching
Hi @Yasuda,
it does exist but they are not many options- there are according to the teacher training tool search- 5 across the country, 4 of which are at Sheffield university. Japanese on its own is not an option, you would need to combine it with either Spanish or French. This second "mainstream" language will increase your employability and as a language teacher ( I am one myself!), it is expected that you teach 2 languages. The second language is never really expected to be on the level of your first one- if you could teach it at key stage 3 and maybe build up your knowledge to eventually deliver it at key stage 4, it would help. Have you got an A-level or even a GCSE in another language?
I think the best course of action at this stage is to contact the institutions offering the courses and have a chat with them. You might be able to start a second language from scratch through a subject enhancement course or boost your pre-existing knowledge.
I would also advise you to register for a teaching adviser with Get into Teaching, all our advisers are experienced teachers and they will help you finding the best course for you. It is a free service.
Laure


Hi, thank you so much for your response!

I do have another language at GCSE but that's Russian, so another non-"mainstream" language :tongue:

I've heard that if you gain QTS through a PGCE for either secondary or primary, you are still qualified (at least in England) to teach in the opposite school. So for example if I were to do Primary Education PGCE (something that I've been thinking about anyway for a really long time), I would still be qualified to teach in a secondary school. And you are qualified to teach the subject that you have the highest level qualification of. So in my case I would be qualified to teach Japanese at a secondary school because I have a BA undergrad degree in it, and I would have earned QTS from the Primary Education PGCE. Is this really true? Sorry if this is complete rubbish, but I heard this from a current PGCE Primary Education student so I do feel a little hopeful.

Thank you for telling me about the Get into Teaching service, I've signed up :smile:

Karina
(edited 2 years ago)

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