Velvet cake
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should I be concerned about not having a revision structure per subject?
do I have to memorise information( long term) from every lesson after making revision stuff?
does memorise information after every lesson help with exams?
is it a necessity to do practice questions after revision?
does anyone have any revsion methods that they used consistently every day after school and not for exams ?
also how do students keep up with active recalling across all subjects,seems like a lot?
i need help,if anyone could be any support for the following subjects
psychology
biology
history
id appreciate it
Last edited by Velvet cake; 3 weeks ago
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Ash1234
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(Original post by Velvet cake)
should I be concerned about not having a revision structure per subject?
do I have to memorise information( long term) from every lesson after making revision stuff?
does memorise information after every lesson help with exams?
is it a necessity to do practice questions after revision?
does anyone have any revsion methods that they used consistently every day after school and not for exams ?
i need help,if anyone could be any support for the following subjects
physiology
biology
history
id appreciate it
should I be concerned about not having a revision structure per subject? No not yet because you have started but I do feel start thinking about it 2 months before your exams.
do I have to memorise information( long term) from every lesson after making revision stuff? Yes, from the subjects you have chosen I would make a head start.
does memorise information after every lesson help with exams? Know the basics and memorise the basics.
is it a necessity to do practice questions after revision? Yes exam papers practice are a key
does anyone have any revsion methods that they used consistently every day after school and not for exams? How about you recap yourself in one page what you learnt: write all the keywords from that lesson and their definitions.

Are you by any chance a creative/journaling person?
I've seen a few who studied your a levels and they usually do fancy drawings and journaling for revision if that helps them use coloured pens, diagrams and do notes.

Try this website
https://getrevising.co.uk/

What worked for you in school when you studied GCSE Science? Use the approach you used then.
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15977emily
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Ideally, you should be doing exam papers as revision? Constantly relooking over your notes is of no use! Active Revision!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Velvet cake
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(Original post by Ash1234)
should I be concerned about not having a revision structure per subject? No not yet because you have started but I do feel start thinking about it 2 months before your exams.
do I have to memorise information( long term) from every lesson after making revision stuff? Yes, from the subjects you have chosen I would make a head start.
does memorise information after every lesson help with exams? Know the basics and memorise the basics.
is it a necessity to do practice questions after revision? Yes exam papers practice are a key
does anyone have any revsion methods that they used consistently every day after school and not for exams? How about you recap yourself in one page what you learnt: write all the keywords from that lesson and their definitions.

Are you by any chance a creative/journaling person?
I've seen a few who studied your a levels and they usually do fancy drawings and journaling for revision if that helps them use coloured pens, diagrams and do notes.

Try this website
https://getrevising.co.uk/

What worked for you in school when you studied GCSE Science? Use the approach you used then.
specifically focusing on memorising infomation
would it be best as suggested by another comment to focus on understanding the content in my textbook/class notss as well as the basic outline of each topic, so when exam season comes,to focus on memorising the content and doing past papers

and yes I'm more of a visual learner,also thanks for the website
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lol.yolo
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Making sure you actually understand the content is so important! you can memorise 'facts' but the information is much more likely to stick if you understand the reasoning behind concepts and are able to link topics that way. Try explaining things outlaid to a parent/sibling/pet/cuddly toy, or creating guides 'for dummies'. Teaching your lesson content to a novice is a great way to revise and make sure you actually understand concepts because you need to be able to simplify it and explain it in a way that makes sense to someone with no prior subject knowledge and avoids jargon.
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aaron2578
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(Original post by Velvet cake)
should I be concerned about not having a revision structure per subject?
do I have to memorise information( long term) from every lesson after making revision stuff?
does memorise information after every lesson help with exams?
is it a necessity to do practice questions after revision?
does anyone have any revsion methods that they used consistently every day after school and not for exams ?
also how do students keep up with active recalling across all subjects,seems like a lot?
i need help,if anyone could be any support for the following subjects
physiology
biology
history
id appreciate it
1) No. Don't be too stressed about it; it's just like GCSE but a bit harder. Just make sure to revise well before tests/exams.
2) and 3) I think the better strategy would be to take clear notes in class and organise them clearly so that you know what you need to memorise when it comes to exams.
4) I would say practice questions should form a chunk of revision. Obviously it depends what topic of what subject, but I do think that practice questions are important.
5) No, because I didn't (and don't) do so. It's just not necessary. If you have reason to be concerned, look over your notes the night of the lesson then 1 or 2 days later do that again - it helps get it into long term memory. Other than that, don't do anything else, it's not necessary.
6) I just paid attention in class, and revised well before tests. Didn't do anything else and consistently got good grades.
7) Can't say about the others but I'm in my second year of A-Level Biology and I can tell you the concepts are easy, but there's a lot of stuff to know. I got past this by focusing a lot on memorisation during revision. I memorised everything and did practice questions, and got consistent good grades.

Also, learning styles don't exist. Google it.
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0ptics
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(Original post by aaron2578)
Also, learning styles don't exist. Google it.
Finally, somebody said it. The myth of learning styles has dominated the planet.

IMO, what helps to consolidate knowledge better is motivation from wanting to achieve a higher goal, (sometimes) a harsh deterrent*, having genuine interest in the subject, and lastly, having many things represent one message (aka being multimodal).

*could be stress or another factor.
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Velvet cake
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(Original post by aaron2578)
1) No. Don't be too stressed about it; it's just like GCSE but a bit harder. Just make sure to revise well before tests/exams.
2) and 3) I think the better strategy would be to take clear notes in class and organise them clearly so that you know what you need to memorise when it comes to exams.
4) I would say practice questions should form a chunk of revision. Obviously it depends what topic of what subject, but I do think that practice questions are important.
5) No, because I didn't (and don't) do so. It's just not necessary. If you have reason to be concerned, look over your notes the night of the lesson then 1 or 2 days later do that again - it helps get it into long term memory. Other than that, don't do anything else, it's not necessary.
6) I just paid attention in class, and revised well before tests. Didn't do anything else and consistently got good grades.
7) Can't say about the others but I'm in my second year of A-Level Biology and I can tell you the concepts are easy, but there's a lot of stuff to know. I got past this by focusing a lot on memorisation during revision. I memorised everything and did practice questions, and got consistent good grades.

Also, learning styles don't exist. Google it.
what subjects did you take if you don't mind?
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samcarolinx
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for biology my teachers set us exam questions based on what we have learnt maybe do that
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aaron2578
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(Original post by Velvet cake)
what subjects did you take if you don't mind?
I took maths, further maths, physics and biology. I'm in my second year for all of them.
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0ptics
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(Original post by aaron2578)
I took maths, further maths, physics and biology. I'm in my second year for all of them.
Interesting. I’m not the op (so I apologise if I come off as rude towards the op) but if you don’t mind, do you have specific subject advice for the ones in bold?
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aaron2578
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(Original post by 0ptics)
Interesting. I’m not the op (so I apologise if I come off as rude towards the op) but if you don’t mind, do you have specific subject advice for the ones in bold?
I found that for these kinds of subjects, the key is just to do practice. I dare say that is the single best form of revision for these things, particularly maths.
For maths, I just did tons of practice questions (same for further maths really).
For physics, I did plenty of practice questions but also watched some YouTube videos to clear up on some difficult concepts.
For biology, I did lots of practice questions again but also spent time memorising things - I found the concepts/facts easy, but there were a lot to remember.

Hope this helps!
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