The Student Room Group

computer science

i just started year 13 and decided i want to go into computer science, however the subjects i chose 2 years ago are psychology, health and social and sociology, my mock grades are AAC, so not bad and i was wondering if i could actually go into compsci despite my subjects being unrelated. i wonder how i could get into university with those choices, maybe using my personal statement to talk about compsci. help?
Original post by hangoutkemi
i just started year 13 and decided i want to go into computer science, however the subjects i chose 2 years ago are psychology, health and social and sociology, my mock grades are AAC, so not bad and i was wondering if i could actually go into compsci despite my subjects being unrelated. i wonder how i could get into university with those choices, maybe using my personal statement to talk about compsci. help?


Yes, but you will be looking at 'lower' ranked universities because of your subjects (no maths A-level or CS to make up for it)

Why do you want to go into computer science? Your subjects are very different.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 2
Original post by hangoutkemi
i just started year 13 and decided i want to go into computer science, however the subjects i chose 2 years ago are psychology, health and social and sociology, my mock grades are AAC, so not bad and i was wondering if i could actually go into compsci despite my subjects being unrelated. i wonder how i could get into university with those choices, maybe using my personal statement to talk about compsci. help?

It is easily possible to gain entry into computer science, however, it would improve your chances if you could replace the C up to at least a B, ideally an A.

As you want to go computer science, it is essential you take a foundation year as it will teach you the a-level math and further maths you need to be successful.

Your only route into computing at university is a foundation year; fewer universities will take you on a normal degree without math a-level.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 3
Original post by hangoutkemi
i just started year 13 and decided i want to go into computer science, however the subjects i chose 2 years ago are psychology, health and social and sociology, my mock grades are AAC, so not bad and i was wondering if i could actually go into compsci despite my subjects being unrelated. i wonder how i could get into university with those choices, maybe using my personal statement to talk about compsci. help?


There are two pathways into computer science. Path 1, Path 2. Path 1 is easiest, provides you access to easy jobs, like software developer, databases, networking, etc. Path 1 has the lowest prospects overall. Path 2 opens up your prospects massively, into computer vision, AI, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Security, etc. Path 1 does not allow you to do anything in Path 2, but Path 2 will allow you to do anything in Path 1 as well. The only problem with Path 2 is: it's much harder than Path 1 in computer science.

Path 1 Degree: Southampton Foundation Year for Math, Engineering degrees Southampton Foundation Year

You need ABB in any subject to get in. You complete the foundation year, then you can move to a Computer Science degree.

If you want to be a software developer / database developer / network engineer:
Path 1 Degree: Swansea Computer Science: Swansea Computer Science /w Foundation Year

If you want to get into the above +
Path 2 Degree: Machine Learning, Data Science, Deep Learning, Statistics, Data Mining, Advanced Databases, Security, Cyber Security, Cryptography, Model Checking, Critical Systems, etc:
Swansea Math + Computing: Swansea Computer Science with Math /w Foundation Year

Swansea courses with foundation year have low entry requirements, I think CCC? So if you fail to get your ABB for Southampton, you can always go for Swansea.

Note: A computer science degree is only restricted to software developer, database developer, networking, etc. If you only want to do that, go Path 1. If you want to do other areas of computing as well, go Path 2.

Path 1 Degree: Sheffield university has a good computer science course, requiring BBB.
Sheffield Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 2 Degree: Essex University has a good Math + Computing course
Essex - Math with Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 1: University of Liverpool - CDD at A level
Computer Science w/ Foundation Year
Path 2: University of Liverpool
Computer Science w/ Math Foundation Year
You could take this course, then choose math + computer science after completing it.

As you can see, plenty of options. These are just some of the choices you have.
My advice:

Pathway 1: If you want to be a software developer, network engineer, database administrator, web dev, mobile dev, etc, then it's fine to choose a pure computer science degree, like Sheffield, Southampton, etc.

Pathway 2: However, if you want to get into AI, Security, Cryptography, Graphics, Computer Vision, Deep Learning, etc. You want to go with a Math + Computing degree, either Swansea, Essex or Liverpool. These are three examples I've listed. If you want a higher rank university, you would have to search for math + computing foundation year. Path 2 has to be Math Computing Foundation Year. Path 1 is just Computer Science.

Pathway 1 is the easiest version of computer science, but less prospects. Pathway 2 is the harder version of computer science, but has 5-10 times the prospects and potential.

Pathway 1 has virtually no math. Pathway 2 is very mathematical, but has the highest potential.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 4
Original post by Baleroc
There are two pathways into computer science. Path 1, Path 2. Path 1 is easiest, provides you access to easy jobs, like software developer, databases, networking, etc. Path 1 has the lowest prospects overall. Path 2 opens up your prospects massively, into computer vision, AI, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Security, etc. Path 1 does not allow you to do anything in Path 2, but Path 2 will allow you to do anything in Path 1 as well. The only problem with Path 2 is: it's much harder than Path 1 in computer science.

Path 1 Degree: Southampton Foundation Year for Math, Engineering degrees Southampton Foundation Year

You need ABB in any subject to get in. You complete the foundation year, then you can move to a Computer Science degree.

If you want to be a software developer / database developer / network engineer:
Path 1 Degree: Swansea Computer Science: Swansea Computer Science /w Foundation Year

If you want to get into the above +
Path 2 Degree: Machine Learning, Data Science, Deep Learning, Statistics, Data Mining, Advanced Databases, Security, Cyber Security, Cryptography, Model Checking, Critical Systems, etc:
Swansea Math + Computing: Swansea Computer Science with Math /w Foundation Year

Swansea courses with foundation year have low entry requirements, I think CCC? So if you fail to get your ABB for Southampton, you can always go for Swansea.

Note: A computer science degree is only restricted to software developer, database developer, networking, etc. If you only want to do that, go Path 1. If you want to do other areas of computing as well, go Path 2.

Path 1 Degree: Sheffield university has a good computer science course, requiring BBB.
Sheffield Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 2 Degree: Essex University has a good Math + Computing course
Essex - Math with Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 1: University of Liverpool - CDD at A level
Computer Science w/ Foundation Year
Path 2: University of Liverpool
Computer Science w/ Math Foundation Year
You could take this course, then choose math + computer science after completing it.

As you can see, plenty of options. These are just some of the choices you have.
My advice:

Pathway 1: If you want to be a software developer, network engineer, database administrator, web dev, mobile dev, etc, then it's fine to choose a pure computer science degree, like Sheffield, Southampton, etc.

Pathway 2: However, if you want to get into AI, Security, Cryptography, Graphics, Computer Vision, Deep Learning, etc. You want to go with a Math + Computing degree, either Swansea, Essex or Liverpool. These are two examples I've listed. If you want a higher rank university, you would have to search for math + computing foundation year. Path 2 has to be Math Computing Foundation Year. Path 1 is just Computer Science.

Pathway 1 is the easiest version of computer science, but less prospects. Pathway 2 is the harder version of computer science, but has 5-10 times the prospects and potential.

Pathway 1 has virtually no math. Pathway 2 is very mathematical, but has the highest potential.

thank you so much for spending time writing this :smile: I'm definitely going to look into foundation years instead of just resitting year 12 with new subjects and maybe ill have another go at my gcse math to get my grade higher
Original post by Baleroc
There are two pathways into computer science. Path 1, Path 2. Path 1 is easiest, provides you access to easy jobs, like software developer, databases, networking, etc. Path 1 has the lowest prospects overall. Path 2 opens up your prospects massively, into computer vision, AI, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Security, etc. Path 1 does not allow you to do anything in Path 2, but Path 2 will allow you to do anything in Path 1 as well. The only problem with Path 2 is: it's much harder than Path 1 in computer science.

Path 1 Degree: Southampton Foundation Year for Math, Engineering degrees Southampton Foundation Year

You need ABB in any subject to get in. You complete the foundation year, then you can move to a Computer Science degree.

If you want to be a software developer / database developer / network engineer:
Path 1 Degree: Swansea Computer Science: Swansea Computer Science /w Foundation Year

If you want to get into the above +
Path 2 Degree: Machine Learning, Data Science, Deep Learning, Statistics, Data Mining, Advanced Databases, Security, Cyber Security, Cryptography, Model Checking, Critical Systems, etc:
Swansea Math + Computing: Swansea Computer Science with Math /w Foundation Year

Swansea courses with foundation year have low entry requirements, I think CCC? So if you fail to get your ABB for Southampton, you can always go for Swansea.

Note: A computer science degree is only restricted to software developer, database developer, networking, etc. If you only want to do that, go Path 1. If you want to do other areas of computing as well, go Path 2.

Path 1 Degree: Sheffield university has a good computer science course, requiring BBB.
Sheffield Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 2 Degree: Essex University has a good Math + Computing course
Essex - Math with Computer Science /w Foundation Year

Path 1: University of Liverpool - CDD at A level
Computer Science w/ Foundation Year
Path 2: University of Liverpool
Computer Science w/ Math Foundation Year
You could take this course, then choose math + computer science after completing it.

As you can see, plenty of options. These are just some of the choices you have.
My advice:

Pathway 1: If you want to be a software developer, network engineer, database administrator, web dev, mobile dev, etc, then it's fine to choose a pure computer science degree, like Sheffield, Southampton, etc.

Pathway 2: However, if you want to get into AI, Security, Cryptography, Graphics, Computer Vision, Deep Learning, etc. You want to go with a Math + Computing degree, either Swansea, Essex or Liverpool. These are three examples I've listed. If you want a higher rank university, you would have to search for math + computing foundation year. Path 2 has to be Math Computing Foundation Year. Path 1 is just Computer Science.

Pathway 1 is the easiest version of computer science, but less prospects. Pathway 2 is the harder version of computer science, but has 5-10 times the prospects and potential.

Pathway 1 has virtually no math. Pathway 2 is very mathematical, but has the highest potential.


I found your reply very useful. Thank you
Beside, I have a problem that is preventing me from finding the answers to my revision when studying from the ocr a level computer science book that has no answers and only allows teachers to download a copy of the answers. It seems as if ocr are trying to hold students down from preventing them from answers. Could you help please?
Original post by Blandine25
I found your reply very useful. Thank you
Beside, I have a problem that is preventing me from finding the answers to my revision when studying from the ocr a level computer science book that has no answers and only allows teachers to download a copy of the answers. It seems as if ocr are trying to hold students down from preventing them from answers. Could you help please?

Publishers do that so schools can set questions from the workbook and students can really be tested by it, not crib answers from the answer book. If you really want the answers ask your teacher for them, or look at the text book: the info will be there and it's useful revision.

Quick Reply

Latest