Anonymous #1
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I’m now in my third year of medicine and I did manage to pass years 1 and 2. Even though I was quite significantly (by about 10-15 marks or so) above the pass mark, my rank was still relatively quite low. Anyway, I think that was just down to inexperience with medical school exams and I think I’m doing better now.
I see people in my year group waking up at like 5am to study/ gym/ whatever it is they do and they will spend 6-8 hours a day studying. Now I have no desire to study this long because I just cannot focus, the most I will do in a day (besides lectures) is max 2 hours…
I would say I’m quite lazy comparatively since I hate waking up early in the morning and find it really easy to just not do the lectures. This is so unlike what I was from school
I just feel really guilty that I’m ‘wasting’ my space here at med school by not studying as much as my peers and spending a lot of time out/ exercising/ being a tourist in the city.
Even though I’m passing exams and doing good on assignments I feel as if I don’t deserve the space.
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CatInTheCorner
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#2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I’m now in my third year of medicine and I did manage to pass years 1 and 2. Even though I was quite significantly (by about 10-15 marks or so) above the pass mark, my rank was still relatively quite low. Anyway, I think that was just down to inexperience with medical school exams and I think I’m doing better now.
I see people in my year group waking up at like 5am to study/ gym/ whatever it is they do and they will spend 6-8 hours a day studying. Now I have no desire to study this long because I just cannot focus, the most I will do in a day (besides lectures) is max 2 hours…
I would say I’m quite lazy comparatively since I hate waking up early in the morning and find it really easy to just not do the lectures. This is so unlike what I was from school
I just feel really guilty that I’m ‘wasting’ my space here at med school by not studying as much as my peers and spending a lot of time out/ exercising/ being a tourist in the city.
Even though I’m passing exams and doing good on assignments I feel as if I don’t deserve the space.
Absolute nonsense. You got that place, and doctors far older and far more experienced agreed that you deserved it. Those people are struggling just as much as you are, and the gym isn't where you learn content. Medical school is a different ride for everyone, and if you're passing with less work, more power to you You are valid and doing amazing, don't let imposter syndrome get you down!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by CatInTheCorner)
Absolute nonsense. You got that place, and doctors far older and far more experienced agreed that you deserved it. Those people are struggling just as much as you are, and the gym isn't where you learn content. Medical school is a different ride for everyone, and if you're passing with less work, more power to you You are valid and doing amazing, don't let imposter syndrome get you down!
Thank you so much, I definitely have imposter syndrome which has hit I think properly for the first time…
I do feel like I do much less work than a lot of my peers but you’re right, if I’m passing I guess it isn’t an issue.
At school I was such a grinder, like I would work 6 hours a day to get the grades but since starting uni I just cannot do that anymore. I think I’m very much in the mindset that if I don’t write down my notes/ spend hours reading and writing notes I’m not doing work.
I think my learning style now is more just type up notes once or twice and then use active recall so it feels like I’m doing nothing…
I also haven’t taken part in any medical societies still, I just don’t find any of it that interesting and I don’t think I’ll find it interesting until I graduate lol, I also feel like that makes me less ‘desirable’ as a med student because again, I’m not taking part in any extra curricular things that are medicine related. My social life is very much based around drinking/ going out which is obviously not advantageous in the long term
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spectrum84
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I’m now in my third year of medicine and I did manage to pass years 1 and 2. Even though I was quite significantly (by about 10-15 marks or so) above the pass mark, my rank was still relatively quite low. Anyway, I think that was just down to inexperience with medical school exams and I think I’m doing better now.
I see people in my year group waking up at like 5am to study/ gym/ whatever it is they do and they will spend 6-8 hours a day studying. Now I have no desire to study this long because I just cannot focus, the most I will do in a day (besides lectures) is max 2 hours…
I would say I’m quite lazy comparatively since I hate waking up early in the morning and find it really easy to just not do the lectures. This is so unlike what I was from school
I just feel really guilty that I’m ‘wasting’ my space here at med school by not studying as much as my peers and spending a lot of time out/ exercising/ being a tourist in the city.
Even though I’m passing exams and doing good on assignments I feel as if I don’t deserve the space.
Ofc u deserve it. Not everyone works the same way, if u can't do more than 2 hours revision then that's fine, plus ur passing ur assessments, with minimum effort :eek:, ur really well suited for the course
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Mesopotamian.
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You sound similar to a lot of people in my year group (so you are not unusual) so I wouldn’t worry, as long as you’re passing and keeping up with the workload.
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Surnia
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How will you cope when it comes to doing the job?
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Surnia)
How will you cope when it comes to doing the job?
Well if they're doing alright in the course whilst putting in a third of the hours of their peers, imagine what they'll be able to do when putting a full day into their work
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Flk10
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Tbh I think there’s a happy medium between what you’re doing and the people getting up at 5am to study.

Getting up at 5 to study is really impressive but isn’t going to work for everyone. I would try to have a ‘workday’ that is consistent every day. Personally I’d aim for 9 hours a day- so you should be working on medicine-related things from 9am-6pm.

I would also try to take your exams more seriously by putting in maximum effort- aim to achieve a high rank rather than just doing enough to pass. Imo the vast majority of your time during exam periods should be spent studying.
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artful_lounger
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Hi, I've moved your thread to the current medical students and doctors forum as hopefully they can provide some more advice/support

I don't think you need to be a "gunner" to be a good medical student and you certainly aren't "wasting" your space by not acting as such. The point of the medical degree is to train competent doctors, not for everyone to be academically the best. Moreover the way ranking systems work it's necessarily impossible for everyone to be the "best" in medical school. However even the last ranked person, assuming they are passing their exams, is still going to be a very intelligent and competent individual by all accounts.

Some of the current medical students or doctors on TSR might be able to provide some useful context? becausethenight ecolier GANFYD
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ForestCat
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It’s all about finding what works for you. Some people need to put in those hours or doing so makes them feel better. Others get away with much less. Just like some people like to study in groups and some people revise better alone.

I was someone who did the majority of my studying at exam time only and I did well at medical school and have continued to do so after. For me, having down time not studying was much more beneficial and I could knuckle down when I needed to
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jzdzm
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If you're passing with minimal work, good for you! Means you have scope to increase later if you feel you need to, and you can have a nice work-life balance. Personally I am trying to allow myself to study less this year.
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theredsox
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I think it depends what speciality you want to do when you graduate.

I was more like you and not too concerned with my rank as long as I was passing. In hindsight that wasn’t an ideal strategy for me as I ended up wanting to pursue a competitive/academic speciality and didn’t have the points from medical school at application and had a gap in my CV where medical school performance/prizes should have gone.

Others from medical school that went into less competitive or academic specialties didn’t have that problem. For them passing was enough.

So really, it does depend what you want to do in future.
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