rose.clm
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I'm currently studying for a Nat 5 in physics, and planned to take it to higher, but today in class my physics teacher said that the jump from Nat 5 physics to higher is pretty substantial. Anyone currently doing Higher Physics that could let me know whether it's as difficult as he's implying? thanks!
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BlackLab
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Yes it is a jump for physics (and maths/chemistry), for me I found waves at higher really difficult. The rest of it was also harder, but knowing and really understanding your NAT5 physics will help as most of it is further builds on that - more formulas to consider, more complicated circuits etc. Learn some good study techniques and habits in S4, including realising you need to study from early in the course, and if you have the aptitude and do well in NAT5 you should be fine. Your teacher is just trying to warn you that you are in S4 and you need to start taking it seriously today if you want to do well over the next couple of years.
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Zain-
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(Original post by rose.clm)
I'm currently studying for a Nat 5 in physics, and planned to take it to higher, but today in class my physics teacher said that the jump from Nat 5 physics to higher is pretty substantial. Anyone currently doing Higher Physics that could let me know whether it's as difficult as he's implying? thanks!
People overstate the jump way too much. Higher physics and Advanced Higher physics are really quite easy. I think the reason people struggle is because they sit and memorise everything, like you can do at nat 5 with much sucess as you are probably finding. Memorising things is not the same as understanding something. If you are one of these people you will find it difficult. You need to make sure you understand everything. For everything that you learn you should be able to explain why that happens and I recommend you ask why to everything - one way to test this is you should be able to explain all formulas: where they come from, how to manipulate them and how to use them. You should be able to explain in detail pretty much all the relationships, laws and theories that you learn. You may say this requires memorising but it does not. It simply requires very good understanding of formulas and relationships which you can then apply to any situation.

Physics is a lot like maths (after nat 5 that is) where memorising formulas and how to answer questions will not get you far. When you sit your exams you will see questions asked in ways you have never seen before so it is imperative that you fully understand the course.
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rose.clm
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(Original post by BlackLab)
Yes it is a jump for physics (and maths/chemistry), for me I found waves at higher really difficult. The rest of it was also harder, but knowing and really understanding your NAT5 physics will help as most of it is further builds on that - more formulas to consider, more complicated circuits etc. Learn some good study techniques and habits in S4, including realising you need to study from early in the course, and if you have the aptitude and do well in NAT5 you should be fine. Your teacher is just trying to warn you that you are in S4 and you need to start taking it seriously today if you want to do well over the next couple of years.
thank you!!
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rose.clm
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(Original post by Zain-)
People overstate the jump way too much. Higher physics and Advanced Higher physics are really quite easy. I think the reason people struggle is because they sit and memorise everything, like you can do at nat 5 with much sucess as you are probably finding. Memorising things is not the same as understanding something. If you are one of these people you will find it difficult. You need to make sure you understand everything. For everything that you learn you should be able to explain why that happens and I recommend you ask why to everything - one way to test this is you should be able to explain all formulas: where they come from, how to manipulate them and how to use them. You should be able to explain in detail pretty much all the relationships, laws and theories that you learn. You may say this requires memorising but it does not. It simply requires very good understanding of formulas and relationships which you can then apply to any situation.

Physics is a lot like maths (after nat 5 that is) where memorising formulas and how to answer questions will not get you far. When you sit your exams you will see questions asked in ways you have never seen before so it is imperative that you fully understand the course.
thank you, that makes a lot of sense. i'll definitely put more time into trying to understand concepts more!
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