How can I stop paying for the NHS?

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benj99
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I'm looking at getting private medical insurance but no longer wish to contribute towards other peoples' healthcare. Is there a way I can reduce my tax burden so that the NHS lot can just pay for each other and I pay for my own?
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londonmyst
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Emigrate to a tax haven that does not have a universal free healthcare at point of use system.
Good luck!
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Napp
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You dont its part of your taxes. Not to mention most private healthcare is done in public hospitals and it certainly wont be a 'private' ambulance and medical team that com to your aid if you have a stroke or get hit by a car.
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2PllsIPp
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(Original post by benj99)
Is there a way I can reduce my tax burden so that the NHS lot can just pay for each other and I pay for my own?
Taking a pay cut will get you some of the way there
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Chadmiral Nelson
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(Original post by benj99)
I'm looking at getting private medical insurance but no longer wish to contribute towards other peoples' healthcare. Is there a way I can reduce my tax burden so that the NHS lot can just pay for each other and I pay for my own?
You do understand how insurance works, don't you? Your payments aren't just locked away for your exclusive use one day, it's put into the provider's central pool which will then be used to give healthcare to (shock horror) other people. The simple fact is, no man is an island, and no one man is capable of entirely funding his own healthcare. Other people have to rely on your small contribution, and you will have to rely on the contributions of others. Unless you think you can actually afford to drop a few hundred grand for a few of cycles of chemo and radiotherapy should you (God forbid) ever get cancer.
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username4910484
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Tax avoidance or emigration. R
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TCA2b
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Sadly not, notwithstanding ceasing to have an income altogether.
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Quady
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(Original post by TCA2b)
Sadly not, notwithstanding ceasing to have an income altogether.
Unless it's untaxed income.
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TheStupidMoon
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(Original post by Napp)
You dont its part of your taxes you selfish git. Not to mention most private healthcare is done in public hospitals and it certainly wont be a 'private' ambulance and medical team that com to your aid if you have a stroke or get hit by a car.
There are plenty of useless or overpaid positions in the medical system sucking up taxpayers money. I think that's more selfish.Some are even dangerous and harmful.

We are also deprived of being able to educate and treat ourselves so are forced to use the system by law.
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imlikeahermit
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Go on the dole. It’s what everyone else does.
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hotpud
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(Original post by Napp)
You dont its part of your taxes you selfish git. Not to mention most private healthcare is done in public hospitals and it certainly wont be a 'private' ambulance and medical team that com to your aid if you have a stroke or get hit by a car.
Good point. Private hospitals also don't do very much of the "hard stuff" either, so if you get diabetes, asthma or other ongoing chronic condition, the private sector doesn't want to know because your are too complicated and too expensive. e.g. there is no profit in you.
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username4910484
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(Original post by hotpud)
Good point. Private hospitals also don't do very much of the "hard stuff" either, so if you get diabetes, asthma or other ongoing chronic condition, the private sector doesn't want to know because your are too complicated and too expensive. e.g. there is no profit in you.
How do you know that?
From my understanding there certainly is profit to be made out of patients with chronic/ long term conditions.

It’s emergency care that private hospitals don’t really do in the UK.
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Napp
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(Original post by TheStupidMoon)
There are plenty of useless or overpaid positions in the medical system sucking up taxpayers money. I think that's more selfish.Some are even dangerous and harmful.

We are also deprived of being able to educate and treat ourselves so are forced to use the system by law.
Quite probably, whats that got to do with what i said though ? Nor how having a bloated bureaucracy, however wasteful, can be described as 'dangerous'
No you arent. You are more than welcome to educate and try and treat yourself at home, it certainly isnt illegal. I'm not sure who told you such tosh but there is nothing stopping you reading a book. If, however, youre talking about self medicating with dangerous drugs/medications then can you take a guess as to why that is legally banned by 'the system'? I didnt take you for the sort advocating people be allowed to pop down the chemist to buy a bottle of phenobarbital or morphine to treat them selves - or someone else, more to the point. You're banned from medicating/operating on yourself for a good reason.
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Napp
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(Original post by glassalice)
How do you know that?
From my understanding there certainly is profit to be made out of patients with chronic/ long term conditions.

It’s emergency care that private hospitals don’t really do in the UK.
Yes and no, depends on the condition. Ones that recquire lots of drugs and scanning etc. can be a nice drip feed of cash for the hospital, not so much for the insurer, a fair whack of these conditions though can be considered too niche to be able to raise money from .. hence the issue of 'orphan drugs' and whatnot. Never mind conditions caused by living in 3rd world areas where there certainly is no money in bothering to look into treatments.
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Djtoodles
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Haha, if there was a way to pay less tax I would be doing it as I also use private healthcare for everything. It isn’t really what you imagine it to be though, it almost always uses NHS infrastructure and you’re almost just paying a premium to be at the front of the rather long ques. The private doctors are really good though and i have a checkup each year as part of it.

Thankfully I’ve never needed them for anything more serious than an appointment for a cough but a friend of mine spent two years trying to get a problem sorted via the NHS. The NHS doctors first told him the pain was caused by anxiety and stress. Then eventually gave him painkillers. Then started giving him medication for all the things they suspected it was without ever referring him for the tests because they told him the wait is around 8 months. I convinced him to spend the money on private, within a few days he met a new doctor, within a week he had the tests which found the exact problem and just over a month later he had a small op to fix the problem and hes been fine since. Hilariously the tests and op were at the same hospital he would have been referred to by the NHS doctor.

His experience alone would be enough to convince me to go private if I wasn’t already. The NHS should be great but its fumbled by idiots and it’s the patients who suffer for it.
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TCA2b
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(Original post by Djtoodles)
Haha, if there was a way to pay less tax I would be doing it as I also use private healthcare for everything. It isn’t really what you imagine it to be though, it almost always uses NHS infrastructure and you’re almost just paying a premium to be at the front of the rather long ques. The private doctors are really good though and i have a checkup each year as part of it.
True. With that said, it's not really had the opportunity to develop as it has like in some countries across Europe or indeed, Singapore. Here it's as you say, more of a premium addon to the NHS.
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