jas-
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I'm about to start maths, finance and accounting at Queen Mary uni, but im wondering whether maths and economics is better for the career I'm looking at (hedge fund management)?thanks
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by jas-)
I'm about to start maths, finance and accounting at Queen Mary uni, but im wondering whether maths and economics is better for the career I'm looking at (hedge fund management)?thanks
I'm sure others have more knowledge on this topic than me but afaik, the more mathematical the better but it's very very rare to go straight from an undergraduate degree to a graduate role in a hedge fund, those that do will likely do things like applied maths.

It's far more common to spend a couple years in investment banking and then move to a hedge fund so it's likely your best bet might be to target IB than to actually target a HF. May be a bit of a struggle from QMUL tho
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anonuser99
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
I'm sure others have more knowledge on this topic than me but afaik, the more mathematical the better but it's very very rare to go straight from an undergraduate degree to a graduate role in a hedge fund, those that do will likely do things like applied maths.

It's far more common to spend a couple years in investment banking and then move to a hedge fund so it's likely your best bet might be to target IB than to actually target a HF. May be a bit of a struggle from QMUL tho
You're inadvertantly giving advice from two different ends of the spectrum here. Your advice about taking a more mathematical degree would be great if OP was interested in hedge funds with a quantitative or trading/macro slant. But people who go to quant or macro HFs do not come from investment banking. Not quite sure on the entry into quant HFs but macro HF analysts tend to come from FICC trading desks in S&T (which STEM helps for). Investment bankers go to the fundamental driven funds (L/S, event-driven, distressed).

@OP If you're interested in the types of HFs that IB serves then it really doesn't matter which degree you choose. If you're interested in the quant or macro HFs then yes I'd suggest switching. Regardless, you might want to think about your runway a little bit. As Ben has said, straight out of UG to any HF from any uni (not to mention QMU) would be v. difficult and tbh quant HFs like postgrad qualifications anyway.
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by anonuser99)
You're inadvertantly giving advice from two different ends of the spectrum here. Your advice about taking a more mathematical degree would be great if OP was interested in hedge funds with a quantitative or trading/macro slant. But people who go to quant or macro HFs do not come from investment banking. Not quite sure on the entry into quant HFs but macro HF analysts tend to come from FICC trading desks in S&T (which STEM helps for). Investment bankers go to the fundamental driven funds (L/S, event-driven, distressed).

@OP If you're interested in the types of HFs that IB serves then it really doesn't matter which degree you choose. If you're interested in the quant or macro HFs then yes I'd suggest switching. Regardless, you might want to think about your runway a little bit. As Ben has said, straight out of UG to any HF from any uni (not to mention QMU) would be v. difficult and tbh quant HFs like postgrad qualifications anyway.
I think you put it more succinctly than I did but yes I was meaning the S&T roles at an IB then to a HF rather than from the actual IBD of an IB. Felt like it was fair to assume the OP might be more interested in the quant/macro HF area due to him talking about degrees joint with maths but I may be wrong.

Personally I'd aim for S&T or some fairly quantitative area of research like FI or something at an investment bank or an asset manager before trying for a hedge fund, especially from QMUL, then move to a HF with a macro/quant focus. Personally I wouldn't massively recommend the IBD -> fundamental HF route if you've got a passion for maths.
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anonuser99
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
I think you put it more succinctly than I did but yes I was meaning the S&T roles at an IB then to a HF rather than from the actual IBD of an IB. Felt like it was fair to assume the OP might be more interested in the quant/macro HF area due to him talking about degrees joint with maths but I may be wrong.

Personally I'd aim for S&T or some fairly quantitative area of research like FI or something at an investment bank or an asset manager before trying for a hedge fund, especially from QMUL, then move to a HF with a macro/quant focus. Personally I wouldn't massively recommend the IBD -> fundamental HF route if you've got a passion for maths.
Yeah I don't assume anything on this forum, especially from people still in sixth form. Most don't have a very good idea of what a hedge fund is, let alone know that it's really not one thing but a catch all term from a bunch of different alt funds with varying mandates.

Not that I blame them, I didn't have a clue either but I think it's better not to assume and maybe open up a discussion about what they think they know.
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by anonuser99)
Yeah I don't assume anything on this forum, especially from people still in sixth form. Most don't have a very good idea of what a hedge fund is, let alone know that it's really not one thing but a catch all term from a bunch of different alt funds with varying mandates.

Not that I blame them, I didn't have a clue either but I think it's better not to assume and maybe open up a discussion about what they think they know.
Maybe I expect too much haha.

What I don't quite understand from generally the 6th formers or 1st year uni types is that if I'm not sure what an IB/HF/AM/PE/etc firm actually does, I'd read tonne about it before even considering to ask a question on a public forum. Secondly, when people say they're passionate and ambitiously targeting a certain type of firm but have never googled what that actual firm does, I just don't understand the thought process that goes into that 😅. How can someone want to truly go into an industry when they don't know what they do?

Don't get me wrong, it's good to ask questions, that's what forums are for, but when it's so easily accessible on Google it seems a bit odd. I'm sure I was naive too at 18 but I feel like at least I did a fair amount of my own research, and I know I'm being a bit harsh on people.
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anonuser99
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
Maybe I expect too much haha.

What I don't quite understand from generally the 6th formers or 1st year uni types is that if I'm not sure what an IB/HF/AM/PE/etc firm actually does, I'd read tonne about it before even considering to ask a question on a public forum. Secondly, when people say they're passionate and ambitiously targeting a certain type of firm but have never googled what that actual firm does, I just don't understand the thought process that goes into that 😅. How can someone want to truly go into an industry when they don't know what they do?

Don't get me wrong, it's good to ask questions, that's what forums are for, but when it's so easily accessible on Google it seems a bit odd. I'm sure I was naive too at 18 but I feel like at least I did a fair amount of my own research, and I know I'm being a bit harsh on people.
Sorry to derail this thread OP.
Anyway Ben, it is my firm belief that googling is a skill that many people don't bother to hone. It probably stems largely from the fact that in secondary school/sixth form, you're spoonfed information. Anything you theoretically ever need to know during that time of your life will be told to you by a teacher or some other authority figure at some point. But when you start uni/adulting life, that stops very abruptly and not everyone gets the memo immediately. When the memo hits, I think there are two types of people in the world: those whose first instinct is to be independent and seek answers from existing info and those whose first instinct is to seek help from others. Neither is better than the other in the grand scheme of things but ultimately each one needs to learn to hone the other instinct. Simple example: when buying a laptop, some people will just ask their friend or whatever what's the best laptop for X and buy that. But others will spend time understanding what makes a laptop good for X activity and find the laptop that fits that category themselves.

Idk why I've just gone on a tangent about this but this is kind of my working theory on why there are people like Leviticus and why there are people like OP.
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