Maternity support worker job interview

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Shadenotshade
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#1
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#1
Hi all,

I'm an experienced healthcare assistant. I've worked in acute care with adult males and females but never worked in maternity yet.

I have an interview for a maternity support worker coming up soon and need help!

What kind of questions do they ask in the interview for this role?

And what is the midwife looking for in an applicant?

And what is the best way to answer the questions?

Thanks
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Tracey_W
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#2
(Original post by Shadenotshade)
Hi all,

I'm an experienced healthcare assistant. I've worked in acute care with adult males and females but never worked in maternity yet.

I have an interview for a maternity support worker coming up soon and need help!

What kind of questions do they ask in the interview for this role?

And what is the midwife looking for in an applicant?

And what is the best way to answer the questions?

Thanks
Hope this help you ok
I'm a NHS registered midwife..



What makes a good maternity support worker.......
flexible and adaptable to deal with unpredictable situations. able to follow instructions and procedures. willing to be present at childbirth. able to work under pressure.

What questions do they ask in a support worker interview........
Few support worker interview questions with sample answers..

Why do you want this support worker role? ...
What skills can you bring to this support worker role? ...
What is your process for evaluating a client's needs? ...
Tell me about a challenging experience you've had and how you overcame it.?



Why do you want to be a maternity support worker.....
The 'right' reasons would include: wanting to make a difference for mothers and their newborn babies, getting a start within the medical profession, and training with the goal of becoming a fully qualified midwife. Furthermore, this is your chance to show the interviewers that you have researched their hospital... Whether or not you want to become a qualified midwife you tell them this.



Working in maternity care is one of the most popular and sought-after careers in the NHS. Since you’ll be working with vulnerable mothers and infants, it’s safe to say that the requirements for this role as really strict. With this in mind, it’s vital that you have an understanding of what the role is about, and how to pass the interview, before you start the application form
some top tips on how to ace your maternity care assistant interview – and these tips will be useful for other NHS job interviews too!

What is a Maternity Care Assistant.......
Maternity Care Assistants conduct their work under the supervision of midwives. They have a wide range of responsibilities within the maternity ward, including:

Providing care and support for mothers and infants.
Conducting blood tests, and other medical observational tasks, to ensure patients are in good health.
Working directly with parents to provide support and information about newborn babies.
Performing routine admin tasks around the ward.
Ensuring hospital equipment is in good, working order.
As you might have guessed from the name, maternity care assistants are there to support and assist patients within the ward. To do this, they must have a particular set of skills.

In this blog, we'll show you how to pass Maternity Care Assistant Interview questions.
Maternity Care Assistant Interview: Essential Qualities
Working around mothers and infants requires a particular type of person and skillset, which is somewhat different to those in a normal ICU ward. Although many of the skills do cross over, it’s even more important that maternity care assistants can take an empathetic and dedicated approach to those under their care. The types of qualities that would be expected from a maternity care assistant include:

Caring and non-judgemental;
Capable of dealing with unpredictable scenarios and situations;
Flexible, in terms of shift patterns and working practices;
An ability to closely follow set rules and procedures;
Able to empathise and show an understanding of other people’s feelings;
Willing to assist and take part in (somewhat) unpleasant situations, such as childbirth.




Those are some ideals on questions.....
NHS Sample Interview Question 1
Thank you for coming to see us today. To start off, please tell us a little bit more about yourself, and what you are like as a person.

This is a very typical starting interview question, and you will hear this question in almost any type of interview, whether that’s for NHS roles or something else. However, that doesn’t mean you should take it lightly. Particularly when applying for a role as an NHS Maternity Care Assistant, it’s imperative that you can show the interviewer that you are a caring, approachable, and empathetic person, who can follow rules and procedures. So, make sure you sell yourself!

Show the interviewers that you are a caring, compassionate person.
Study the personal qualities of the job description, and match these with your answer.
Link your personality with the requirements for the job role – showing knowledge and research in the process!
NHS Sample Interview Question 2
Why do you want to work in a maternity ward? Is there a particular reason for this?

This is a great question, and serves as a natural follow up to the previous question. It’s important for the interviewers to establish that you are applying for the right reasons, and not the wrong ones. The ‘wrong’ reasons would include: you just want to earn some money, you feel more comfortable working as an assistant than a lead midwife, or liking babies. The ‘right’ reasons would include: wanting to make a difference for mothers and their newborn babies, getting a start within the medical profession, and training with the goal of becoming a fully qualified midwife.

Furthermore, this is your chance to show the interviewers that you have researched their hospital. Show them that you don’t just want to work in ‘any’ maternity ward – but in this one, and this hospital, specifically. This will really impress the interviewers, and go a long way to helping you secure the position.

Demonstrate to the interviewers that you want work in a maternity ward for the right reasons.
Don’t tell them that you are only applying because you want to earn some money!
Research the hospital beforehand, to show knowledge and commitment during your interview!
NHS Sample Interview Question 3
What would you say is your biggest weakness?

This is a common interview question, and therefore is one that you must prepare for. When answering this question, make sure you give a response which is a) honest, and b) doesn’t indicate a problem with your ability to do the job. After all, you’re there to sell yourself. The most common answer to this question is tell the interviewers that you set such high standards that you sometimes expect too much of others, or that you are not very good at delegating. These are good responses, but interviewers have heard them thousands of times before, likely from every candidate who walks through the door. So, as mentioned, give an honest response. For example, you could tell the interviewer that you sometimes struggle with numbers and figures, but that you are taking sustained steps to improve this. This will show your commitment to improvement and development, and demonstrate to them that you are an honest and authentic person.

Don’t tell the interviewer that you are perfect and have no weaknesses. This will make you look arrogant and dishonest!
Demonstrate to the interview that although you have weaknesses, you are working hard to improve these.
Try not to give a weakness which would compromise your ability to do the job.
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Shadenotshade
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#3
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@tracey_w thanks. Happy to get a response from an actual midwife.

You mean I'm supposed to say I want to train as a midwife even if I don't want to? I've already had my degree.

And how are vital signs done for babies ?

What tasks exactly does a maternity assistant do on an average shift?
Last edited by Shadenotshade; 8 months ago
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Shadenotshade)
@tracey_w thanks. Happy to get a response from an actual midwife.

You mean I'm supposed to say I want to train as a midwife even if I don't want to? I've already had my degree.

And how are vital signs done for babies ?

What tasks equally does a maternity assistant do on an average shift?
Well you honoured in getting reply from a midwife as I just seen your post.

You didn't say in your original post you had a degree in what !!!

Well you might be asked if you would consider going on to be a midwife as reason why you say yes ( if you asked this).

You might want to do a MCA course instead and work alongside the midwives all the time as interesting role to do. You work in hospital while training to become a MCA.

As a an experience healthcare assistant you should know about vital signs on people as no difference in new born babies than adults generally.
You would do your basic obs if you meaning this about vital signs.

If baby is in maternity ICU then they would be hooked up to the machine.

Your tasks are looking after the new mum after birth, making sure she's ok and keeping eye on her with obs as required, making beds, help parent with bathing themselves if required especially after csections, make sure baby is well and feeding ok, plus lots of other tasks as you'll know each day is different.
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Shadenotshade
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(Original post by Tracey_W)
Well you honoured in getting reply from a midwife as I just seen your post.

You didn't say in your original post you had a degree in what !!!

Well you might be asked if you would consider going on to be a midwife as reason why you say yes ( if you asked this).

You might want to do a MCA course instead and work alongside the midwives all the time as interesting role to do. You work in hospital while training to become a MCA.

As a an experience healthcare assistant you should know about vital signs on people as no difference in new born babies than adults generally.
You would do your basic obs if you meaning this about vital signs.

If baby is in maternity ICU then they would be hooked up to the machine.

Your tasks are looking after the new mum after birth, making sure she's ok and keeping eye on her with obs as required, making beds, help parent with bathing themselves if required especially after csections, make sure baby is well and feeding ok, plus lots of other tasks as you'll know each day is different.
Biomedical science. If I say I don't want to become a midwife, will that affect my application?

No difference really? I'm sure the normal pulse rate in adults differs for a child?

Thanks
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Tracey_W
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#6
Report 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by Shadenotshade)
Biomedical science. If I say I don't want to become a midwife, will that affect my application?

No difference really? I'm sure the normal pulse rate in adults differs for a child?

Thanks
Yes it won't make any difference in application ok as you might not get asked this

Your pulse rate will obviously be different from a baby and adult as obviously we differ in it but saying in generally on it.
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ILoveSunsets
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(Original post by Tracey_W)
Yes it won't make any difference in application ok as you might not get asked this

Your pulse rate will obviously be different from a baby and adult as obviously we differ in it but saying in generally on it.
Hi. I have applied to a couple of Band 2 and Band 3 MSW roles but in outpatients/clinics.
Some ask for experience and some don't.

Can I ask what sort of training hospitals provide?
What's the difference between working in ward and clinics?

Also, any tips to ace interviews!
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by ILoveSunsets)
Hi. I have applied to a couple of Band 2 and Band 3 MSW roles but in outpatients/clinics.
Some ask for experience and some don't.

Can I ask what sort of training hospitals provide?
What's the difference between working in ward and clinics?

Also, any tips to ace interviews!
Band 2 & 3 Maternity Support / care worker's role's will be provided with any training required for the job if none already. The hospital should arrange for you any necessary training courses that is required for this particular job. You'll probably be shadowing the qualified staff there at first to allow you to be shown anything that is necessary especially for wards working as this is more hand's on care.

Outpatients clinics if you ever been to hospital for a follow up appointment then this is similar to that as you'll probably call the patient and take them to the doctor's room and either sit in on the consultation or not depending on the doctor's. You will assist the staff with anything that is required by them for you to do.

Wards - unfortunately you'll probably find this more hand's on care with either you dealing with patients once you have the necessary training, and in between probably doing the daily OBS and making sure that the mum's and babies are both well and that they are managing changing the babies nappies, washing and dressing, feeding either by breastfeeding or bottle feeding.

The working hours on wards can vary between you working say 7.5 hours a day ( split shifts patterns) or doing a long 12 - 13 Hours shift but only doing 3 days out of 7 days a week compared to working 5 days out of 7 days with the split shifts patterns okay.
Clinics usually are between 8 - 6pm Monday to Friday ( maybe only working 4 days out of the 5 with day of in the week plus free weekends ).

Your interview questions can vary unfortunately as can be basically asked anything but some examples are :-
1) why you have applied for this particular job
2) what if any experience have you got in nursing ( not necessary required)
3) on a ward how would you cope with a bereavement / stillbirth and still be professional as a MCA nurse
4) coping with stress how important is is you deal with it.
5) how can you cope under pressure as part of a team member
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Shaysta niazi
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#9
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(Original post by Tracey_W)
Well you honoured in getting reply from a midwife as I just seen your post.

You didn't say in your original post you had a degree in what !!!

Well you might be asked if you would consider going on to be a midwife as reason why you say yes ( if you asked this).

You might want to do a MCA course instead and work alongside the midwives all the time as interesting role to do. You work in hospital while training to become a MCA.

As a an experience healthcare assistant you should know about vital signs on people as no difference in new born babies than adults generally.
You would do your basic obs if you meaning this about vital signs.

If baby is in maternity ICU then they would be hooked up to the machine.

Your tasks are looking after the new mum after birth, making sure she's ok and keeping eye on her with obs as required, making beds, help parent with bathing themselves if required especially after csections, make sure baby is well and feeding ok, plus lots of other tasks as you'll know each day is different.
Hello I am planning to be a maternity support worker after my a levels becuase i am planning to take the degree apprentice route at the ucl hospital.What band would i start at and how long would i do it for in order to do the degree apprenticeship in Greenwhich University.Would i be garanteed to be funded for University funds.What hospital do you work in if you dont mind thank you
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Shaysta niazi)
Hello I am planning to be a maternity support worker after my a levels becuase i am planning to take the degree apprentice route at the ucl hospital.What band would i start at and how long would i do it for in order to do the degree apprenticeship in Greenwhich University.Would i be garanteed to be funded for University funds.What hospital do you work in if you dont mind thank you

Hi shaysta

As a maternity care assistant you'll be paid probably at bottom of band 2 payscale about £18,500 a year full time before any tax etc okay, but those who live in the London area usually are paid slightly more than rest of the UK.

( Pay and benefits
Your standard working week will be around 37.5 hours and may include a mix of shifts, such as nights, early starts, evenings and weekends. As a maternity support worker, you’ll be paid on the Agenda for Change (AFC) pay system, typically starting on band 2.

You’ll also have access to our generous pension scheme and health service discounts, as well as 27 days of annual leave, plus bank holidays, which increases the longer you’re in service. )


I'm a NHS Scotland registered midwife working in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board area in the largest hospital in Glasgow.
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Shaysta niazi
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Thank u so much for your response.I live in London and the one I have seen is usually £24-£25k do I have to be a maternity support worker to be able to take the degree apprentice route or am I able to go into it straight after my a levels and how is your job do you recommend others

(Original post by Tracey_W)
Hi shaysta

As a maternity care assistant you'll be paid probably at bottom of band 2 payscale about £18,500 a year full time before any tax etc okay, but those who live in the London area usually are paid slightly more than rest of the UK.

( Pay and benefits
Your standard working week will be around 37.5 hours and may include a mix of shifts, such as nights, early starts, evenings and weekends. As a maternity support worker, you’ll be paid on the Agenda for Change (AFC) pay system, typically starting on band 2.

You’ll also have access to our generous pension scheme and health service discounts, as well as 27 days of annual leave, plus bank holidays, which increases the longer you’re in service. )


I'm a NHS Scotland registered midwife working in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board area in the largest hospital in Glasgow.
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Shaysta niazi)
Thank u so much for your response.I live in London and the one I have seen is usually £24-£25k do I have to be a maternity support worker to be able to take the degree apprentice route or am I able to go into it straight after my a levels and how is your job do you recommend others
Yes living in London then the pay is better than outside of London.

You don't need to do a maternity care assistant job prior to either going straight to university or going down the apprenticeship route where you be paid while you trained and you'll not have hopefully any unforeseeable debt's.

I didn't have any previous experience prior to going to university for my midwifing degree although I'm from a big nursing family as they are all adult nurses.

What do you prefer to do - if you have all the necessary entry requirements for university of your chose then go and apply this way.
But if you want to go down the apprenticeship route where you are being paid while you are being trained then do this.

At the end of the day it's ultimately your own decisions.
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Shaysta niazi
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#13
Thank u so much for your reply
Yes hopefully I find a degree apprentice route straight after my a levels


(Original post by Tracey_W)
Yes living in London then the pay is better than outside of London.

You don't need to do a maternity care assistant job prior to either going straight to university or going down the apprenticeship route where you be paid while you trained and you'll not have hopefully any unforeseeable debt's.

I didn't have any previous experience prior to going to university for my midwifing degree although I'm from a big nursing family as they are all adult nurses.

What do you prefer to do - if you have all the necessary entry requirements for university of your chose then go and apply this way.
But if you want to go down the apprenticeship route where you are being paid while you are being trained then do this.

At the end of the day it's ultimately your own decisions.
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