Resistance training and cardio

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-Femto-
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I'll keep this short. I want to build muscle and also do cardio. I'm doing PPL 6 days a week and want to do 30m swimming straight after.

My plan is to eat at a surplus for the resistance training and for the swimming as well. Is there any down side to do this?

I want to build strength and muscle, but want to keep my cardiovascular system strong. I'm not trying to lose weight and I've calculated the correct amount of calories I would need for maintenance, surplus (including weight lifting and swimming). Just want to check if there's nothing else to be concerned about.
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Kyri
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What I'd say is to keep your cardio quite low intensity otherwise it's going to significantly impact your recovery from lifting and impair your strength gains. This is especially true since you're lifting 6 times per week. You might say that going low intensity with your cardio will mean that area won't improve quite as fast, and that's correct, but you can't make maximum gains in all areas of training at the same time. You have to decide what your priority is. If it's muscle building then you want to train that area the hardest and take it easier with the cardio. On the other hand a professional sports person is more likely to hit the cardio hard but not train weights so hard that it compromises performance in their sport.

So you've got the right idea by doing your cardio after your lifting if you want to prioritise lifting. And a calorie surplus will optimise the strength and size gains, but try and not go overboard with the surplus, or excessive fat gains will start affecting your swimming performance.
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Zain_Ahmed
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(Original post by Kyri)
What I'd say is to keep your cardio quite low intensity otherwise it's going to significantly impact your recovery from lifting and impair your strength gains. This is especially true since you're lifting 6 times per week. You might say that going low intensity with your cardio will mean that area won't improve quite as fast, and that's correct, but you can't make maximum gains in all areas of training at the same time. You have to decide what your priority is. If it's muscle building then you want to train that area the hardest and take it easier with the cardio. On the other hand a professional sports person is more likely to hit the cardio hard but not train weights so hard that it compromises performance in their sport.

So you've got the right idea by doing your cardio after your lifting if you want to prioritise lifting. And a calorie surplus will optimise the strength and size gains, but try and not go overboard with the surplus, or excessive fat gains will start affecting your swimming performance.
I agree, To grow in on area will mean that you will need to reduce the other. So just think what your goals are and then from that decide how you will train
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-Femto-
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(Original post by Kyri)
What I'd say is to keep your cardio quite low intensity otherwise it's going to significantly impact your recovery from lifting and impair your strength gains. This is especially true since you're lifting 6 times per week. You might say that going low intensity with your cardio will mean that area won't improve quite as fast, and that's correct, but you can't make maximum gains in all areas of training at the same time. You have to decide what your priority is. If it's muscle building then you want to train that area the hardest and take it easier with the cardio. On the other hand a professional sports person is more likely to hit the cardio hard but not train weights so hard that it compromises performance in their sport.

So you've got the right idea by doing your cardio after your lifting if you want to prioritise lifting. And a calorie surplus will optimise the strength and size gains, but try and not go overboard with the surplus, or excessive fat gains will start affecting your swimming performance.
The priority is muscle building. With the swimming I won't be doing anything intense, I don't know how to swim so will be practicing a crawl each day for 30 minutes. Does that count as low intensity?

What exactly is an example of low intensity cardio? And can I maintain good cardiovascular health while doing it?

For the surplus have I got the right idea? I'm eating a 300kcal surplus for the resistance training and I''ve searched up the average kcal burnt during a 30m swim and planned on eating that. Is that not necessary?
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Kyri
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(Original post by -Femto-)
The priority is muscle building. With the swimming I won't be doing anything intense, I don't know how to swim so will be practicing a crawl each day for 30 minutes. Does that count as low intensity?

What exactly is an example of low intensity cardio? And can I maintain good cardiovascular health while doing it?

For the surplus have I got the right idea? I'm eating a 300kcal surplus for the resistance training and I''ve searched up the average kcal burnt during a 30m swim and planned on eating that. Is that not necessary?
Low intensity cardio is anything that you could easily do for an hour or more without having to stop due to fatigue. An example is slowly walking on an incline treadmill as opposite to doing sprints. The first will still elevate your heart rate and promote health but without taxing your muscle recovery.

Practicing the skill of crawl is okay, but if you find it hard to do continuously for 30 minutes, I'd suggest doing mostly breaststroke since it's easier to do with lower speed/effort. You can always add more crawl into your swims as you get more efficient with it. And yes, this will be enough to maintain good cardiovascular health. It just won't make you a particularly fast swimmer since you won't be training that.

300 kcal surplus sounds okay to me. It is necessary to eat back the calories you burn during your swim. For the sake of example, if you burn 300 kcals during your swim, you need to eat an additional 300 kcals to stay in your intended calorie surplus.
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username5812124
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I have been swimming for 13 years so if you ever need a set for swimming I can make one for you. swimming helps a lot with back muscles, abdominal and legs. for me, I work out/run for about 2 hours then is swim for 2 hours and 30 minutes. if I'm feeling good later I do Zumba. if you are going to swim hard eat carbs in the morning or before you workout. if you have any questions about swim i would be happy to help
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elixirhtc
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I think swimming is one of the best exercise if you want to do it regularly.. it makes your muscles strong and healthy ..
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