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I am a Sixth Form student, who didn't get the ideal grades I would of hoped for, which had led me to chose BTECS and not A-Levels like Chemistry/Biology etc. Which meant I couldn't do medicine initallity after Sixth Form

I recently heard about the graduate entry medicine course and some courses consider science/non science 2.1 degrees, For most of my teen years I was interested in Psychology/Medicine, but clearly I can't do Medicine at the moment, so it seems like I will take Psychology at Uni, If I was to get a 2.1 or a 1st degree, what would that mean for my hopes of the graduate entry medicine course, would it give me an advantage since it is Psychology? Could I choose clinical psychology and they would still count as a science subject? Please let me know on the factors like this and the entrance exams, so I can see my chances
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ecolier
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I am a Sixth Form student, who didn't get the ideal grades I would of hoped for, which had led me to chose BTECS and not A-Levels like Chemistry/Biology etc. Which meant I couldn't do medicine initallity after Sixth Form

I recently heard about the graduate entry medicine course and some courses consider science/non science 2.1 degrees, For most of my teen years I was interested in Psychology/Medicine, but clearly I can't do Medicine at the moment, so it seems like I will take Psychology at Uni, If I was to get a 2.1 or a 1st degree, what would that mean for my hopes of the graduate entry medicine course, would it give me an advantage since it is Psychology? Could I choose clinical psychology and they would still count as a science subject? Please let me know on the factors like this and the entrance exams, so I can see my chances
Never ever do a random degree with the sole aim for graduate entry medicine.

It will take longer, cost more and most importantly will be much more competitive. Just take a gap year to improve your stats.
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ForgottenChav
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(Original post by ecolier)
Never ever do a random degree with the sole aim for graduate entry medicine.

It will take longer, cost more and most importantly will be much more competitive. Just take a gap year to improve your stats.
I am not, My main aspiration was a Clinical Psychologist, but when I heard the graduate entry medicine course, I thought I could improve skills with the course and become a psychiatrist. I know how slim the acceptance rate for the course is
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ecolier
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I am not, My main aspiration was a Clinical Psychologist, but when I heard the graduate entry medicine course, I thought I could improve skills with the course and become a psychiatrist. I know how slim the acceptance rate for the course is
If you want to be a psychiatrist, do medicine rather than psychology.

You could well be "stuck" with a psychology degree - note that it is equally (if not more competitive) to be a clinical psychologist. You will most likely need Masters, PhDs etc. to compete for a place.
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ForgottenChav
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(Original post by ecolier)
If you want to be a psychiatrist, do medicine rather than psychology.

You could well be "stuck" with a psychology degree - note that it is equally (if not more competitive) to be a clinical psychologist. You will most likely need Masters, PhDs etc. to compete
My initial plan was to do the psychology degree, and since you need a 1 year work experience gap between the psychology course and the doctorate, I would apply for the medicine then, therefore if my medicine course gets turned down, I still have my psychology route still avaliable, then I guess from then on I keep applying every year to a different uni or the same uni, while doing the doctorate
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ecolier
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
My initial plan was to do the psychology degree, and since you need a 1 year work experience gap between the psychology course and the doctorate, I would apply for the medicine then, therefore if my medicine course gets turned down, I still have my psychology route still avaliable, then I guess from then on I keep applying every year to a different uni or the same uni, while doing the doctorate
Bear in mind: most psychology graduates don't end up doing anything related to psychology.

As a medic, I would advise either concentrate on medicine or forget about it and focus on something else.
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ForgottenChav
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(Original post by ecolier)
Bear in mind: most psychology graduates don't end up doing anything related to psychology.

As a medic, I would advise either concentrate on medicine or forget about it and focus on something else.
I do like neuroscience a canny bit aswell, what do you think would be the best degree to stand out in medicine between neuroscience and psychology. When the uni look through people's degrees, like I would assume they would pick neuroscience over computer science, as neuroscience is clearly more in depth. Another question also, do you think it would increase or decrease my chance of graduate medicine entry if I go with the clinical psychology course instead of the psychology course
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asclepeion
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I do like neuroscience a canny bit aswell, what do you think would be the best degree to stand out in medicine between neuroscience and psychology. When the uni look through people's degrees, like I would assume they would pick neuroscience over computer science, as neuroscience is clearly more in depth. Another question also, do you think it would increase or decrease my chance of graduate medicine entry if I go with the clinical psychology course instead of the psychology course
Some unis do not count psychology as a bio/science degree btw which can limit GEM university options e.g. KCL do not accept psychology.
If you meet the degree discipline criteria (if a university even has one as some do not) then no, a university will not pick your degree over someone else's potentially less relevant to medicine degree.
Choosing clinical psychology over psychology won't increase or decrease your chances, choosing a degree instead of going straight into medicine as a school leaver will decrease your chances of medicine though.
I did Biochemistry, I'm reapplying for GEM yet again. There are English, Music, Psychology graduates etc who got in for GEM on first/second time applying and I would have assumed my Biochemistry degree is more scientifically relevant to medicine.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I do like neuroscience a canny bit aswell, what do you think would be the best degree to stand out in medicine between neuroscience and psychology. When the uni look through people's degrees, like I would assume they would pick neuroscience over computer science, as neuroscience is clearly more in depth. Another question also, do you think it would increase or decrease my chance of graduate medicine entry if I go with the clinical psychology course instead of the psychology course
Honestly you'd be better off taking a gap year (or two) and taking A-levels or an Access to Medicine course (provided it's acceptable by the medical schools you want to apply to). It's statistically easier to get in to standard entry medicine than GEM, and even taking two years out to take A-levels would lead you to qualify as a doctor in the same time or faster than doing a degree - it would also be much cheaper (you do not receive full funding for medicine as a graduate).

GEM courses don't care about your degree subject outside of a tick box exercise, if applicable. Some require a bioscience course, if you have one you tick that box - they don't care whether you did plant sciences or biomedical sciences in that case. Some require a STEM degree in general - they won't care if you did physics or physiology then. Some have no specific degree requirements, in which case they won't care if you did comparative literature or underwater basket weaving. Doing X degree or Y degree won't increase your chances of getting an offer provided that the degree is accepted in the first place by the GEM course you're applying to.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I do like neuroscience a canny bit aswell, what do you think would be the best degree to stand out in medicine between neuroscience and psychology.
Nothing "stands out" - I can tell you as an interviewer / someone also involved in med admissions, "standing out" is mostly bad.

You just want to be a standard, good candidate like thousands of others. And as said - no degree "stands out". Most GEM students would have studied biomedical sciences.

When the uni look through people's degrees, like I would assume they would pick neuroscience over computer science, as neuroscience is clearly more in depth.
Nope, they would pick the one with the higher UCAT / GAMSAT score (indeed if CompSci is even accepted, some GEM courses will only accept life science courses).

Another question also, do you think it would increase or decrease my chance of graduate medicine entry if I go with the clinical psychology course instead of the psychology course
As said above (and also I have said many times) - even if you have an inkling of wanting to do medicine in the future, do not do another degree. You WILL regret it.
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ForgottenChav
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Thank you all for your help, It has made me think a lot, I may just take psychology, biomedical sciences or neuroscience, It has always been a dream of mine to be a doctor, follow in my dads footsteps, but he was way smarter than me in college compared to me haha, anyways I will try the degree that will give me the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine
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asclepeion
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
Thank you all for your help, It has made me think a lot, I may just take psychology, biomedical sciences or neuroscience, It has always been a dream of mine to be a doctor, follow in my dads footsteps, but he was way smarter than me in college compared to me haha, anyways I will try the degree that will give me the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine
ecolier's advice was literally the exact opposite of what you've now decided on.
No particular degree will give you the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine.
It doesn't matter if you take psychology, biomed or neuroscience.
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gemplzx
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I am a Sixth Form student, who didn't get the ideal grades I would of hoped for, which had led me to chose BTECS and not A-Levels like Chemistry/Biology etc. Which meant I couldn't do medicine initallity after Sixth Form

I recently heard about the graduate entry medicine course and some courses consider science/non science 2.1 degrees, For most of my teen years I was interested in Psychology/Medicine, but clearly I can't do Medicine at the moment, so it seems like I will take Psychology at Uni, If I was to get a 2.1 or a 1st degree, what would that mean for my hopes of the graduate entry medicine course, would it give me an advantage since it is Psychology? Could I choose clinical psychology and they would still count as a science subject? Please let me know on the factors like this and the entrance exams, so I can see my chances
as has already been said, GEM is not an easy route. I'd look into foundation courses instead - I'm not sure what exactly you're currently studying but I believe some are aimed at people with good grades in arts subjects, and some at people with poorer grades in science subjects. Usually they guarantee entry onto medicine after (successful completion of) the foundation year, which is definitely preferable to 3 year degree + 4 year GEM (assuming you get straight in and don't have to do multiple application cycles like many people do!)
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ecolier
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
Thank you all for your help, It has made me think a lot, I may just take psychology, biomedical sciences or neuroscience, It has always been a dream of mine to be a doctor, follow in my dads footsteps, but he was way smarter than me in college compared to me haha, anyways I will try the degree that will give me the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine
Mark my words, if you struggled to get into standard undergrad medicine, you will find it much much harder for GEM. Don't underestimate it - as I have said several times - you will regret it.

(Original post by asclepeion)
ecolier's advice was literally the exact opposite of what you've now decided on.
No particular degree will give you the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine.
It doesn't matter if you take psychology, biomed or neuroscience.
Exactly, I'm super confused with OP's reply.

It's like I told them to do one thing, and they said "thank you, I will just do the opposite" :confused:
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gemplzx
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
Thank you all for your help, It has made me think a lot, I may just take psychology, biomedical sciences or neuroscience, It has always been a dream of mine to be a doctor, follow in my dads footsteps, but he was way smarter than me in college compared to me haha, anyways I will try the degree that will give me the best chance of going to Graduate Entry Medicine
if this is the route you're thinking of taking, maybe consider Swansea - they give preferential treatment to grads who have completed one of these (https://www.swansea.ac.uk/medicine/pathways/) courses when they apply for GEM. Some other unis may also do this or have other forms of giving preferential treatment (e.g. Southamption graduates in any discipline have lower UCAT thresholds when applying for GEM).
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ecolier
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(Original post by gemplzx)
if this is the route you're thinking of taking, maybe consider Swansea - they give preferential treatment to grads who have completed one of these (https://www.swansea.ac.uk/medicine/pathways/) courses when they apply for GEM. Some other unis may also do this or have other forms of giving preferential treatment (e.g. Southamption graduates in any discipline have lower UCAT thresholds when applying for GEM).
Every time I can't convince people to go down the wrong path, I personally feel responsible and can get quite sad.

But then it's their life, their time and money. If they wanted to do it the hard way I suppose there's nothing us outsiders can do but to minimise the damage.
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gemplzx
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(Original post by ecolier)
Every time I can't convince people to go down the wrong path, I personally feel responsible and can get quite sad.

But then it's their life, their time and money. If they wanted to do it the hard way I suppose there's nothing us outsiders can do but to minimise the damage.
exactly! I'm applying to GEM at the moment having had an incredibly stressful year trying to balance grad studies, working, volunteering, work experience & prepping for the GAMSAT and UCAT... wish I could shake anyone that thinks applying for medicine will be easier at 21+ when you have more responsibilities (and are applying for a far far more competitive course) than at 18!

I also want to note for OP that he options I gave about Swansea and Southampton still aren't ideal - they only give you slightly lower entrance exam thresholds, so you still have to perform well, and 100% have to impress at interview. For most grad courses (inc. Swansea), you also have to do the GAMSAT which is immensely harder than the UCAT - some people take a whole year out of their other commitments to prepare for it.
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Incidentaloma
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
My initial plan was to do the psychology degree, and since you need a 1 year work experience gap between the psychology course and the doctorate, I would apply for the medicine then, therefore if my medicine course gets turned down, I still have my psychology route still avaliable, then I guess from then on I keep applying every year to a different uni or the same uni, while doing the doctorate
I think you are seriously underestimating the competitiveness of a clinical psychology doctorate. I know the doctoral courses say you need a minimum of a year's relevant work experience to be eligible to apply, but the truth is that the vast majority of candidates will have much more than that. There are also extra selection tests involved for many courses, similar to UCAT. The DClinPsy is statistically as competitive as medicine, but you're making it sound as if you don't get into GEM, you're certain to get on the DClinPsy. It always baffles me when students who didn't meet the A-level requirements talk this way, as though getting the high admissions scores needed for GEM or doing doctoral-level work in psychology is somehow going to be easier and more feasible than A-level resits. Have you researched both professions in depth? At the moment you seem to think a psychiatrist is a more highly trained version of a psychologist, so before you make further plans, I think you need to gain a more realistic understanding of what they both do day to day. Then you'll have a stronger sense of what to aim for.
(Original post by ecolier)
Every time I can't convince people to go down the wrong path, I personally feel responsible and can get quite sad.

But then it's their life, their time and money. If they wanted to do it the hard way I suppose there's nothing us outsiders can do but to minimise the damage.
To be honest, I sometimes wonder how many people who say this are actually really keen to do med, and how many are just entertaining a daydream that they wouldn't actually want in reality. In my daydreams I'd love to run a horse riding centre. In reality I know I wouldn't want that as my day job, which is why I'm not taking practical steps to achieve it. Retaking A-levels is the obvious thing to do if you really want to study medicine, whereas focusing on GEM is a way to keep it safely in daydream territory, with all the difficulties at a safe remove.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Incidentaloma)
...To be honest, I sometimes wonder how many people who say this are actually really keen to do med, and how many are just entertaining a daydream that they wouldn't actually want in reality. In my daydreams I'd love to run a horse riding centre. In reality I know I wouldn't want that as my day job, which is why I'm not taking practical steps to achieve it. Retaking A-levels is the obvious thing to do if you really want to study medicine, whereas focusing on GEM is a way to keep it safely in daydream territory, with all the difficulties at a safe remove.
I agree, it is also strange to me how people considering this will state "I know how competitive GEM is and I will work very hard to get it"... so why not work half as hard now and get in the easier way?

Strange way of thinking... and perhaps just deferring the problem, kicking the can down the road sort of thing.
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(Original post by ForgottenChav)
I am a Sixth Form student, who didn't get the ideal grades I would of hoped for, which had led me to chose BTECS and not A-Levels like Chemistry/Biology etc. Which meant I couldn't do medicine initallity after Sixth Form

I recently heard about the graduate entry medicine course and some courses consider science/non science 2.1 degrees, For most of my teen years I was interested in Psychology/Medicine, but clearly I can't do Medicine at the moment, so it seems like I will take Psychology at Uni, If I was to get a 2.1 or a 1st degree, what would that mean for my hopes of the graduate entry medicine course, would it give me an advantage since it is Psychology? Could I choose clinical psychology and they would still count as a science subject? Please let me know on the factors like this and the entrance exams, so I can see my chances
Hi, I have just finished doing my undergrad in Biomedical Science which many people do to get into medicine. I originally did with the aims of going to medicine which is still a ambition of mine. But my advice to you if I was in your shoes is do a degree that is related to medicine but can get you a job. The reason I say this is that after completing a degree it doesn't make it any easier for you getting into medicine. Grad medicine is a lot more competitive than undergraduate but if anything if I could back in time I would either do a degree that I know I could get a job straight away for example like pharmacy, nursing, midwifery etc. But as I have limited knowledge regarding the job possibilities after psychology I would say do your research and just make sure you are ok with doing it as you may not get into medicine straight away. I wish you the best of luck on your journey and please do not stress about it, there are many options out there just think about it carefully.
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