Does young enterprise help with medicine application

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2020Gang
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aliaa03
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hello

it’s not really the extra curriculars you do, it’s what you LEARN from them and how you relate the skills to medicine.

For example the Duke of Edinburghs award, no one cares if you did gold if you can’t tell the interviewer what you gained from the experience and how that will make you a better medical student or future doctor.

So for example i did 18 months of volunteering in a care home. Most people would write that on their medicine application and leave that as that. But i spoke about how working in a carehome with elderly people with conditions such as Parkinson’s or Alheizmers allowed me to improve my communication skills which are vital for the role as the role is very people orientated, and you will constantly be interacting with members of the hospital such as nurses, receptionists as well as pharmacists to collaborate on a case, you may also need strong communication skills in order to communicate with people who may not speak the same language as you, or perhaps to explain a course of treatment to a patient with less scientific profiency than you.

So basically, any extra curricular can be valuable to your medicine application. You don’t need masses, i promise, just 1 or 2 that you can fit into your personal statement and discuss in depth about what you learned from the experience and how you can apply that to your role as a doctor and future medical student
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2020Gang
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(Original post by aliaa03)
hello

it’s not really the extra curriculars you do, it’s what you LEARN from them and how you relate the skills to medicine.

For example the Duke of Edinburghs award, no one cares if you did gold if you can’t tell the interviewer what you gained from the experience and how that will make you a better medical student or future doctor.

So for example i did 18 months of volunteering in a care home. Most people would write that on their medicine application and leave that as that. But i spoke about how working in a carehome with elderly people with conditions such as Parkinson’s or Alheizmers allowed me to improve my communication skills which are vital for the role as the role is very people orientated, and you will constantly be interacting with members of the hospital such as nurses, receptionists as well as pharmacists to collaborate on a case, you may also need strong communication skills in order to communicate with people who may not speak the same language as you, or perhaps to explain a course of treatment to a patient with less scientific profiency than you.

So basically, any extra curricular can be valuable to your medicine application. You don’t need masses, i promise, just 1 or 2 that you can fit into your personal statement and discuss in depth about what you learned from the experience and how you can apply that to your role as a doctor and future medical student
Finally thank you so much! Your the first persona that’s made actually think clearly now and give valid reasons to do or not to do extracurriculars. Like I want to get into Oxford for medicine and I understand I need to work extremely hard, but it’s not just about grades and many people have told me just don’t focus on extracurriculars that much as some unis don’t care, but that is the complete opposite. A teacher of mine told me that he taught a student that did 5 alevels and got A* in them but got rejected by oxbridge because all he did was study and had no extracurriculars
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ecolier
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(Original post by 2020Gang)
...A teacher of mine told me that he taught a student that did 5 alevels and got A* in them but got rejected by oxbridge because all he did was study and had no extracurriculars
Lol my advice is never trust teachers / schools with regards to med admissions. No offence to them but it's simply not their area of expertise.
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aliaa03
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(Original post by 2020Gang)
Finally thank you so much! Your the first persona that’s made actually think clearly now and give valid reasons to do or not to do extracurriculars. Like I want to get into Oxford for medicine and I understand I need to work extremely hard, but it’s not just about grades and many people have told me just don’t focus on extracurriculars that much as some unis don’t care, but that is the complete opposite. A teacher of mine told me that he taught a student that did 5 alevels and got A* in them but got rejected by oxbridge because all he did was study and had no extracurriculars
Yes, please don’t worry about ridiculous grades like that. All medical schools just ask for 3 A levels and a good UCAT score, if you have a good personal statement and their required predicted grades as well as a good UCAT score you should hopefully receive an interview invite.

Most medical schools carry out interviews using an MMI format, and here you will be able to shine and stand out from generic academic candidates who are obviously doing medicine just because they don’t know what else they should do or perhaps for the money or cause of their parents.

The strongest medicine candidates and people who do well in interviews are the ones who can really apply their skills learnt from any experiences they’ve had and can tell the interviewer how that skill will make them a better future doctor or why that’s an important skill for medicine.

Seriously, don’t worry about having extremely impressive extra curriculars. Try doing an online GP shadowing course, or a MOOC from FutureLearn, or getting some work experience volunteering at a hospital or local clinic or carehome, the way you talk about your experiences will be FAR more important than something ridiculous like 5 A levels or inventing a cure for a disease as a part time job 😂😂

(beware that oxford like to ask very random questions that you can’t prepare for in their interview!!!! they like to test how candidates think on the spot and their thought processes. This helps weed out the great candidates from academics with no personality )
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aliaa03
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(Original post by ecolier)
Lol my advice is never trust teachers / schools with regards to med admissions. No offence to them but it's simply not their area of expertise.
absolutely. when i applied i told my UCAS adviser how i didn’t have the required GCSE science grades and i should probably resit them, and he told me the universities wouldn’t care as long as i got good A level grades and i should focus on A levels rather than resitting.

Seemed a bit suspicious so i phoned up the universities to ask and they said i would be rejected due to not meeting the entry requirements. Extremely glad i resat them and didn’t listen to my teacher!!!
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