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ecology and conservation degree

hey, i have recently changed my mind from nursing/midwifery and now am interested in ecology and conservation.
i was wondering if anyone knows if this is a good degree that will get me somewhere and if it has a decent amount of biology in it.
also i am interested in good unis to do this at, i have looked at stirling and bournemouth
thanks
Look at courses at Aberysthwyth, Plymouth, Sussex, Aberdeen and St Andrews.

Careers info :
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-advice/what-can-i-do-with-my-degree/environmental-science
https://www.conservation-careers.com/
Have a look at the Guardian Good Uni guide. Lots of top unis offering ecology:

St Andrews
Lancaster
Imperial
Edinburgh
York
Leeds
Exeter
Edge Hill
Plymouth
Sheffield
Royal Holloway
Nottingham-trent
What A levels have you been studying? It might be worth considering a broader biological sciences degree with plant, animal, human and ecology and conservation but often these courses want more specific A levels than Ecology and Conservation would.
Original post by emerzz44
hey, i have recently changed my mind from nursing/midwifery and now am interested in ecology and conservation.
i was wondering if anyone knows if this is a good degree that will get me somewhere and if it has a decent amount of biology in it.
also i am interested in good unis to do this at, i have looked at stirling and bournemouth
thanks


Hi! I’m going to Bournemouth for ecology this year! It would be nice to talk before going if you’re doing it too! (:
Reply 5
Original post by emerzz44
hey, i have recently changed my mind from nursing/midwifery and now am interested in ecology and conservation.
i was wondering if anyone knows if this is a good degree that will get me somewhere and if it has a decent amount of biology in it.
also i am interested in good unis to do this at, i have looked at stirling and bournemouth
thanks


Dear emerzz44,

It's great that you want to get into conservation as a career, hopefully I think you'll find it just as fulfilling as nursing/midwifery. The conservation sector is incredibly broad with possible careers ranging from project management, policy, research, consultancy, education along with species monitoring, breeding programmes and reintroductions. Each one of these areas is filled with challenges that need proactive and passionate people to engage with if we are to address the global biodiversity and climate change emergency. I personally have always had a passion for the natural world and I am determined to contribute to its preservation in some way so that future generations can enjoy it.

Deciding the right course can of course be a challenge as there are such a range to choose from. Have you considered the University of Kent as possible option?

I think you would be pleasantly surprised by the range of natural science modules that you could take on the BSc Wildlife Conservation course to really tailor it to your interests. For example, if the natural sciences is your passion, then there are module options that explore evolutionary genetics, the diversity of living organisms, the function of plants and animals, biological anthropology, the biology of mammals, hormones and behaviour, and the opportunity to go on a research field field trip to conduct tropical ecology surveys. There are also a range of geographical and anthropological modules that you can choose from as well which add another perspective to the nature and challenges facing the conservation sector.

In terms of entry requirements it is BBB for A Levels including a natural science subject. As for statistics, Geography and Environmental Studies at Kent was ranked 1st in the UK for research output in the Times Higher Education. I would say that when it comes to making a difference in the conservation sector, conducting and engaging in quality research is an absolute necessity.

Just to introduce myself, I am a student from the University of Kent studying Wildlife Conservation with a Year in Professional Practice. I am currently on my Placement Year and have found the course to be incredibly useful and fulfilling so far. I have found the student and staff community, alongside the expert teaching within the School of Anthropology and Conservation, to be really engaging and supportive; you really feel that you are a part of active conservation network. The school is also a part of the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE), which is unique to the University of Kent. As an institute it strives to conserve biodiversity and the ecological processes that humans as a species depend upon by breaking down of scientific barriers and improving conservation policy and management through groundbreaking research and teaching. When I was applying for universities this really set Kent apart from the others as a true investment into my future career and my desire to really make a difference in the conservation sector. The option to do a Year in Professional Practice was also a great opportunity for me to improve my ecological and employability skills, as well as make useful networking connections in my preferred conservation field.

I hope that you found my experiences useful as you reflect on which course to choose. I ask you though, whether you are choosing a conservation course purely based on academics or social enrichment, why not choose one that offers both?

Best wishes,

George
Hi,

Third year Ecology and Conservation student at Lancaster here! I have really enjoyed my course and particularly the fact that the wide range of modules available to choose from means you can tailor the degree to suit your interests, for example choosing more biology themed modules. Here's the link if you want to look at the course in more detail: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/ecology-and-conservation-bsc-hons-c180/2023/ and I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Best wishes,
Carla
Lancaster University Ambassador

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