OkThanksBye
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I used to read quite a lot as a kid but over the last 5 or so years I haven't touched a book. I've just started University and have been given masses of reading lists (economics) and I literally can't read more than a few sentences properly. Reading a chapter takes me hours. Any advice?
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ageshallnot
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How did you cope at GCSE and A-level?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by OkThanksBye)
I used to read quite a lot as a kid but over the last 5 or so years I haven't touched a book. I've just started University and have been given masses of reading lists (economics) and I literally can't read more than a few sentences properly. Reading a chapter takes me hours. Any advice?
Academic reading is different from reading for pleasure - when you say '...haven't touched a book', I presume you're not talking literally, and you're not talking about using printed texts for leaning purposes - otherwise as ageshallnot says, how in earth did you pass your A levels?

Reading for a degree is more about extracting the right information from texts quickly and reliably. It's a skill which needs to be learnt: how to use the contents page and index; how to skim read to see (a) does this book contain the right information, (b) is it useful to me, in terms of a new/different argument or angle; how much time to spend extracting information on each text...

Contact your library or LRC about this, or look on your student portal for LRC information. Nearly all uni libraries run sessions early in term and regularly thereafter on research skills, including the academic reading ones I've mentioned above. Book onto one!
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Jaaferrrr!!!
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You can get software that reads from pdfs or whatever
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xxx0xxxo
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Really break it down and stay engaged. For example, read 2-3 sentences out loud and then summarise them in one short sentence. Don't think about all the other pages or how much there is to read. It's better to read half a text and understand it well then force through a full one and only get half of it anyway.

Or skim read. Read the abstract, first and last paragraph of intro, and then read the conclusion. Make bullet points on them.
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xxx0xxxo
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(Original post by xxx0xxxo)
Really break it down and stay engaged. For example, read 2-3 sentences out loud and then summarise them in one short sentence. Don't think about all the other pages or how much there is to read. It's better to read half a text and understand it well then force through a full one and only get half of it anyway.

Or skim read. Read the abstract, first and last paragraph of intro, and then read the conclusion. Make bullet points on them.
This video has some helpful tips https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gv5ku0eoY6k&t=277s
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