Which A levels do you suggest I pick?

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Darren090909
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Hi, I'm in Year 11 and have to choose my A levels soon.
Currently, I am thinking of taking English Lit & Lang, Law, and Economics. I want to choose 4 A levels if possible (I plan to drop an A level if I don't believe that I can maintain good grades on all 4 on the next year) and am interested in a career relating to Law, though I want to keep my options open.

I'm not quite sure what 4th A level I should pick up or whether I should drop Economics in place of something else. I'm considering taking Maths, Computer Science or Business Studies as my 4th option but I am honestly uncertain. I'm not the biggest avid fan of maths but I don't completely hate it either. I'm just not sure if I want to take it because it'll look good or save myself from the effort of doing such a technical subject. I am contemplated taking subjects such as Psychology (since I did take it at GCSE) or Philosophy but I'm not sure if it would be very useful for me to actually take.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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Jermey
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I would say pick business because you can gain a lot of occupation with it
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dianna3007
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there is absolutely no need for a 4th a level, uni's dont need it all/ if you really want to do one then I would say to choose the subject you are most interested in. law doesn't need any specific a levels, an essay based a level may be preferred, so you don't have to do a level law.
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Darren090909
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(Original post by dianna3007)
there is absolutely no need for a 4th a level, uni's dont need it all/ if you really want to do one then I would say to choose the subject you are most interested in. law doesn't need any specific a levels, an essay based a level may be preferred, so you don't have to do a level law.
Thanks, I do understand that but I still want to pick up Law A level since it does help me start understanding Law quite a bit earlier and know what I'm getting into. I usually get good grades (8-9s) so as long as I try, I'm pretty sure that I'll be able to do well even with 4 A levels. I'm also dropping an A level if I don't think I can sustain my good grades so I think it will be fine. Thank you for the advice though.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Darren090909)
Thanks, I do understand that but I still want to pick up Law A level since it does help me start understanding Law quite a bit earlier and know what I'm getting into. I usually get good grades (8-9s) so as long as I try, I'm pretty sure that I'll be able to do well even with 4 A levels. I'm also dropping an A level if I don't think I can sustain my good grades so I think it will be fine. Thank you for the advice though.
The one thing you dont want to do is to pick Economics and Business studies together. Some leading universities will only accept it as 1 A level due to them being similar subjects.

If you are looking to go onto study Economics at university most leading universities require Maths A level. The same applies to Computer Science. For Psychology many have high Maths GCSE requirements.

Other than that take subjects that you will do well in and enjoy. For something like Law there are no required subjects. You dont need to take 4 A levels. All uuiversities make offers on 3,
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Darren090909
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
The one thing you dont want to do is to pick Economics and Business studies together. Some leading universities will only accept it as 1 A level due to them being similar subjects.

If you are looking to go onto study Economics at university most leading universities require Maths A level. The same applies to Computer Science. For Psychology many have high Maths GCSE requirements.

Other than that take subjects that you will do well in and enjoy. For something like Law there are no required subjects. You dont need to take 4 A levels. All uuiversities make offers on 3,
I see. I guess I'll drop Business Studies. Thanks
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Darren090909)
I see. I guess I'll drop Business Studies. Thanks
There have been cases where students have come on here having been rejected by universities. They had taken 3 A levels and one of the top universities rejected them as in their eyes they only had 2. Students fall foul of that every year.
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Holamisamigos213
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Hey man im applying to the law this year and im doing english lit, sociology and biology. but from the look of your choices it looks good i do agree that you should do 3 a levels not 4 dont put more stress on yourself, also ive heard that law a level isnt that respected compared to other a levels like history or english but please dont take my word for it do research and email unis about it. if u wanna do law when your older i suggest do two essay based a levels and one non just for variety. also i found this:
"I study both Language and Literature at A level. In my opinion, English Literature is much more widely renowned as well as respected. With language, you're picking up analytical skills but the work isn't as intense as in lit also
"English Literature is more reputable than English Language because 1) it is a traditional subject. Language is not. 2) English Language does not really teach you anything that is not taught in English Literature. The AQA website describes English Language as discovering linguistic frameworks and how these can be used to analyse language. English Literature touches on this as well. If you took both lit and lang you would basically be studying the same thing twice "I would say you should only take English Language if you plan to do a creative writing degree. If you are thinking of taking the subject in order to impress top universities then pick English Literature"

Look these quotes should by no means sway you if u enjoy lang and lit do them both, u just have to think about time management and efficiency. do research, email unis and i hope u come to a conclusion.

any questions on english lit a level im here to ask if not good luck.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Holamisamigos213)
Hey man im applying to the law this year and im doing english lit, sociology and biology. but from the look of your choices it looks good i do agree that you should do 3 a levels not 4 dont put more stress on yourself, also ive heard that law a level isnt that respected compared to other a levels like history or english but please dont take my word for it do research and email unis about it. if u wanna do law when your older i suggest do two essay based a levels and one non just for variety. also i found this:
"I study both Language and Literature at A level. In my opinion, English Literature is much more widely renowned as well as respected. With language, you're picking up analytical skills but the work isn't as intense as in lit also
"English Literature is more reputable than English Language because 1) it is a traditional subject. Language is not. 2) English Language does not really teach you anything that is not taught in English Literature. The AQA website describes English Language as discovering linguistic frameworks and how these can be used to analyse language. English Literature touches on this as well. If you took both lit and lang you would basically be studying the same thing twice "I would say you should only take English Language if you plan to do a creative writing degree. If you are thinking of taking the subject in order to impress top universities then pick English Literature"

Look these quotes should by no means sway you if u enjoy lang and lit do them both, u just have to think about time management and efficiency. do research, email unis and i hope u come to a conclusion.

any questions on english lit a level im here to ask if not good luck.
This is outdated information that went out years ago. Law is a preferred subject by universities and is on the same level as History. The Russell Group used to recommend certain subjects. This advice was withdrawn as it was highly contentious and wasnt supported by their universities.

Here is Birminghams preferred subject list for Law

Preferred subjects:
We prefer applications from students offering at least two A levels from our list of preferred subjects:

Accounting, Ancient History, Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Business Studies, Chemistry, Classical Civilisation, Computing, Drama and Theatre Studies, Economics, English Language, English Language and Literature, English Literature, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Further Mathematics, Geography, Geology, Government and Politics, History, History of Art, Human Biology, Law, Mathematics, Medieval History, Modern or Classical Languages, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Statistics, World Development
Last edited by swanseajack1; 1 week ago
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yesIAmACamel
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My Advice is to not take Computer Science.
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Holamisamigos213
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
This is outdated information that went out years ago. Law is a preferred subject by universities and is on the same level as History. The Russell Group used to recommend certain subjects. This advice was withdrawn as it was highly contentious and wasnt supported by their universities.

Here is Birminghams preferred subject list for Law

Preferred subjects:
We prefer applications from students offering at least two A levels from our list of preferred subjects:

Accounting, Ancient History, Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Business Studies, Chemistry, Classical Civilisation, Computing, Drama and Theatre Studies, Economics, English Language, English Language and Literature, English Literature, Environmental Science, Environmental Studies, Further Mathematics, Geography, Geology, Government and Politics, History, History of Art, Human Biology, Law, Mathematics, Medieval History, Modern or Classical Languages, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Statistics, World Development
Well thats your opinion, history is more respected than law even of there both on the list its like saying world development is on the same level than maths, well it isnt. look i think doing law a level is a great thing to do as it will help you see if u genuinely have an interest in it but im just giving both sides of the argument. anyway its their choice and i hope they don't take some random peoples advice like me on this website and do some proper research on this topic i think we can both agree on that.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Holamisamigos213)
Well thats your opinion, history is more respected than law even of there both on the list its like saying world development is on the same level than maths, well it isnt. look i think doing law a level is a great thing to do as it will help you see if u genuinely have an interest in it but im just giving both sides of the argument. anyway its their choice and i hope they don't take some random peoples advice like me on this website and do some proper research on this topic i think we can both agree on that.
We dont have to agree we just accept what the universities say. Your view is totally outdated and not backed by anyone It is a matter of fact not opinion.
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...y-requirements
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Holamisamigos213
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
We dont have to agree we just accept what the universities say. Your view is totally outdated and not backed by anyone It is a matter of fact not opinion.
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...y-requirements
bro, its not that respected its a fact not an opinion. your showing me subjects that they accept i know they accept it im not saying they dont but if an applicant came thru that had law and one had history im pretty sure oxford would choose the history one. your links dont back up your statement show me a list of respected a level subjects a top 10 one that has law in it show me one then ill believe u. cus i can show u many.



https://thinkstudent.co.uk/most-respected-a-levels/
https://thebritishexams.com/what-are...evel-subjects/
https://www.studymalaysia.com/educat...level-subjects
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Holamisamigos213)
bro, its not that respected its a fact not an opinion. your showing me subjects that they accept i know they accept it im not saying they dont but if an applicant came thru that had law and one had history im pretty sure oxford would choose the history one. your links dont back up your statement show me a list of respected a level subjects a top 10 one that has law in it show me one then ill believe u. cus i can show u many.



https://thinkstudent.co.uk/most-respected-a-levels/
https://thebritishexams.com/what-are...evel-subjects/
https://www.studymalaysia.com/educat...level-subjects
It doesnt matter what these bodies say. What matters is how the universities consider things and they dont consider it in thias way. There are admissions tutors from RG uiversities on here who will confirm that.

Here is UCL's list. You already have Birmingham's

Entry requirements
General information on entry requirements is provided in this section; specific grades for each of our programmes are listed on each degree page. Please be sure to read both carefully before applying.

Skip to a section
Preferred A levels
Contextual offers
Other UK qualifications
International Baccalaureate
International qualifications
English language requirements
UCL Preparatory courses
A level, AS and GCSE qualifications
You are required to satisfy UCL's general entrance requirements listed below as well as the specific degree programme requirements outlined in our programme descriptions.

We may issue conditional offers based on future examination performance; unless otherwise stated, any conditions for these must be fulfilled by 7 September 2021 for applications made in the 2021 UCAS Cycle, and 31 August 2022 for applications made in the 2022 UCAS Cycle.

A level qualifications
GCSE and equivalent qualifications
Other qualifications
Applications from 'fast-track' students
Preferred A level subjects
In addition to any specified programme requirements, you should also ensure that you are taking at least two A levels from the list of preferred subjects (given below).

We do not recognise General Studies, Thinking Skills and Critical Thinking for admissions purposes.

List of subjects
A
Ancient History
Anthropology
Arabic
Archaeology
Art and Design
Art and Design: 3D Design
Art and Design: Art, Craft and Design
Art and Design: Critical and Contextual Studies
Art and Design: Fine Art
Art and Design: Graphic Communication
Art and Design: Graphic Design
Art and Design: Photography
Art and Design: Textiles

B
Bengali
Biblical Hebrew
Biology
Biology (Salters-Nuffield)
Biology (Human)
Biology B
Business

C
Cantonese
Chemistry
Chemistry (Nuffield)
Chemistry (Salters)
Chinese
Classical Civilisation
Classical Greek
Computer Science

D
Drama (WJEC specification)
Drama and Theatre Studies
Dutch

E
Economics
Economics B
Economics and Business
Economics and Business Studies (Nuffield)
English Language
English Language and Literature
English Literature (specifications A or B where applicable)
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies

F
Film Studies
French

G
Geography A
Geography B
Geology
German
Government and Politics
Greek
Gujarati

H
Hindi
History
History of Art
History of Art and Design

I
Information and Communication Technology
Irish
Italian

J
Japanese

L
Latin
Law

M
Mathematics
Mathematics (MEI)
Further Mathematics
Pure Mathematics
Media Studies (2022 entry)
Modern Greek
Modern Hebrew
Moving Image Arts (CCEA specification)
Music

P
Panjabi
Persian
Philosophy
Physics
Physics (Advancing Physics)
Physics (Salters-Horners)
Polish
Politics
Portuguese
Psychology
Psychology A
Psychology B

R
Religious Studies
Russian

S
Sociology
Spanish
Statistics

T
Tamil
Turkish

U
Urdu

W
Welsh
Welsh (Second Language)
Last edited by swanseajack1; 1 week ago
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spectrum84
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(Original post by Darren090909)
Hi, I'm in Year 11 and have to choose my A levels soon.
Currently, I am thinking of taking English Lit & Lang, Law, and Economics. I want to choose 4 A levels if possible (I plan to drop an A level if I don't believe that I can maintain good grades on all 4 on the next year) and am interested in a career relating to Law, though I want to keep my options open.

I'm not quite sure what 4th A level I should pick up or whether I should drop Economics in place of something else. I'm considering taking Maths, Computer Science or Business Studies as my 4th option but I am honestly uncertain. I'm not the biggest avid fan of maths but I don't completely hate it either. I'm just not sure if I want to take it because it'll look good or save myself from the effort of doing such a technical subject. I am contemplated taking subjects such as Psychology (since I did take it at GCSE) or Philosophy but I'm not sure if it would be very useful for me to actually take.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
What looks good is getting 3 A*'s, don't choose a subject u won't do well in or u dislike, as long as u get good grades u'll be desirable to many unis
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Holamisamigos213
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
It doesnt matter what these bodies say. What matters is how the universities consider things and they dont consider it in thias way. There are admissions tutors from RG uiversities on here who will confirm that.

Here is UCL's list. You already have Birmingham's

Entry requirements
General information on entry requirements is provided in this section; specific grades for each of our programmes are listed on each degree page. Please be sure to read both carefully before applying.

Skip to a section
Preferred A levels
Contextual offers
Other UK qualifications
International Baccalaureate
International qualifications
English language requirements
UCL Preparatory courses
A level, AS and GCSE qualifications
You are required to satisfy UCL's general entrance requirements listed below as well as the specific degree programme requirements outlined in our programme descriptions.

We may issue conditional offers based on future examination performance; unless otherwise stated, any conditions for these must be fulfilled by 7 September 2021 for applications made in the 2021 UCAS Cycle, and 31 August 2022 for applications made in the 2022 UCAS Cycle.

A level qualifications
GCSE and equivalent qualifications
Other qualifications
Applications from 'fast-track' students
Preferred A level subjects
In addition to any specified programme requirements, you should also ensure that you are taking at least two A levels from the list of preferred subjects (given below).

We do not recognise General Studies, Thinking Skills and Critical Thinking for admissions purposes.

List of subjects
A
Ancient History
Anthropology
Arabic
Archaeology
Art and Design
Art and Design: 3D Design
Art and Design: Art, Craft and Design
Art and Design: Critical and Contextual Studies
Art and Design: Fine Art
Art and Design: Graphic Communication
Art and Design: Graphic Design
Art and Design: Photography
Art and Design: Textiles

B
Bengali
Biblical Hebrew
Biology
Biology (Salters-Nuffield)
Biology (Human)
Biology B
Business

C
Cantonese
Chemistry
Chemistry (Nuffield)
Chemistry (Salters)
Chinese
Classical Civilisation
Classical Greek
Computer Science

D
Drama (WJEC specification)
Drama and Theatre Studies
Dutch

E
Economics
Economics B
Economics and Business
Economics and Business Studies (Nuffield)
English Language
English Language and Literature
English Literature (specifications A or B where applicable)
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies

F
Film Studies
French

G
Geography A
Geography B
Geology
German
Government and Politics
Greek
Gujarati

H
Hindi
History
History of Art
History of Art and Design

I
Information and Communication Technology
Irish
Italian

J
Japanese

L
Latin
Law

M
Mathematics
Mathematics (MEI)
Further Mathematics
Pure Mathematics
Media Studies (2022 entry)
Modern Greek
Modern Hebrew
Moving Image Arts (CCEA specification)
Music

P
Panjabi
Persian
Philosophy
Physics
Physics (Advancing Physics)
Physics (Salters-Horners)
Polish
Politics
Portuguese
Psychology
Psychology A
Psychology B

R
Religious Studies
Russian

S
Sociology
Spanish
Statistics

T
Tamil
Turkish

U
Urdu

W
Welsh
Welsh (Second Language)
brother, i don't know if u genuinley dont understand me or just not reading my replies. i know that they accept Law i know ok you hear me i Know you dont have to send me a list of what unis accept i already know ok you copy and pasting this does not help your statement as i already know that information okay. But of course there are certain a levels that are more respected than others thats common knowledge everybody knows this. and due to the links i sent you, you can see that and if u ask anyone history or english lit is more respected than law. it just is. send me a top 10 list with law in it that its respected.

https://www.oxford-royale.com/articl...ubjects-guide/
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Holamisamigos213)
bro, its not that respected its a fact not an opinion. your showing me subjects that they accept i know they accept it im not saying they dont but if an applicant came thru that had law and one had history im pretty sure oxford would choose the history one. your links dont back up your statement show me a list of respected a level subjects a top 10 one that has law in it show me one then ill believe u. cus i can show u many.



https://thinkstudent.co.uk/most-respected-a-levels/
https://thebritishexams.com/what-are...evel-subjects/
https://www.studymalaysia.com/educat...level-subjects
Here is the Russell Group's press statement when they moved away from facilitating subjects. This because their member universities didnt follow the previous advice

Russell Group
Importance of subject choice

23 May 2019

Learning about subject choice is important for students of all backgrounds - but particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds writes Russell Group Chief Executive Dr Tim Bradshaw.

Some people just know what they want to be when they grow up. I watched Open University science programmes on Sunday mornings and wanted to uncover the mysteries of the earth. I duly took A Levels in Chemistry, Maths and Geology before studying the latter at degree level and for my PhD. The educational path for me was clear, at least for the early part of my career.

Many young people, however, are less sure. Should they focus on the subjects they enjoy, or those they are told will lead to the best jobs? Should they specialise in sciences, arts or humanities, or spread their bets? Their parents will know the anxiety of trying to provide sound advice.

So how much do the subjects you study at school really have a bearing on your later life? If you want to enter a selective university, the answer is often a lot.

Admissions teams have a responsibility to accept only the students they believe are prepared for the rigours that will follow. Whether it’s to study Physics, Music or French, for many degrees some prior knowledge is vital, as are specific skills.

Yet in a recent survey of hundreds of Year 10s conducted by the Russell Group, pupils consistently ranked choosing the right subjects as less important for getting into university than other factors. Almost all placed it beneath securing the necessary grades, writing a strong personal statement and giving a good interview. The survey also showed that pupils at independent schools are much more likely than their peers in comprehensives to aspire to university. This means that better off pupils are already choosing their A Level subjects with an eye to their eventual degree.

That these young people appear to be on a clearer trajectory to higher education is no surprise. No matter how much teachers strive to provide the best possible careers advice to all pupils, it is extremely difficult to replicate the support and exposure afforded to those in better off homes.

These young people tend to grow up in households where selective universities are not something that is a remote possibility, but a rite of passage. Where the skills needed to navigate our education system successfully are passed between generations and absorbed by osmosis, and where the phrase “PPE at Oxford” requires no further explanation.

By contrast, research by the Sutton Trust found bright but disadvantaged A Level students to be only half as likely as their wealthier classmates to be taking subjects considered to provide access to good universities. A teacher in a deprived part of the country recently told one of my team about a gifted pupil whose dreams of getting on to a marine biology degree were scuppered because no one had advised her that a BTEC in health and social care was the wrong stepping-stone for this particular aim. Too often, he says, he has seen talented pupils set back by a wrong or absent steer.

If we want to boost social mobility, we need to correct such information imbalances. Tackling the inequalities that affect the life chances of young people has many facets, from raising aspiration to ensuring all pupils receive a quality education. Achieving greater parity in the advice they can access matters greatly too.

The Russell Group, representing 24 leading universities, is therefore launching renewed guidance on subject choice. Our new Informed Choices website will be accessible to all pupils and their parents. Individuals will be able to select different degrees to see which subjects they may need to study first. And they can input countless A Level combinations to understand which university courses are then opened up. In a few clicks, anyone considering university can build up a rich and personalised picture of the routes they might take.

In moving to the new website, we will no longer publish a list of so-called “facilitating subjects”. These have been the subjects deemed to open most doors at our universities, because of the large number of degrees for which they are considered essential preparation. The list was put together particularly to help pupils who wanted to go to university but weren’t yet sure of which degree to take. And to provide clear advice to those who might not otherwise receive it.

Our new, more sophisticated digital tool will do the same thing, but in a different way. Dispensing with facilitating subjects will also help avoid the problem of misinterpretation. I sometimes hear it suggested that every student entering a Russell Group university must have studied at least one of these subjects, or indeed only them. We have always been clear that this is not the case. Our new approach makes this clearer still.

Universities, like many employers, value a rounded education. If, for example, a budding young scientist has met their course’s requirements by taking Biology and Maths A Levels, why shouldn’t they vary their experience with a language or an arts subject? Academic versatility can only be a good thing in a world where we will all be living and working longer, and where more of us are likely to change our careers and directions along the way, as I have.

What matters is that pupils – all pupils, of all backgrounds – are able to explore their options carefully and make subject choices that are well-informed.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Holamisamigos213)
brother, i don't know if u genuinley dont understand me or just not reading my replies. i know that they accept Law i know ok you hear me i Know you dont have to send me a list of what unis accept i already know ok you copy and pasting this does not help your statement as i already know that information okay. But of course there are certain a levels that are more respected than others thats common knowledge everybody knows this. and due to the links i sent you, you can see that and if u ask anyone history or english lit is more respected than law. it just is. send me a top 10 list with law in it that its respected.

https://www.oxford-royale.com/articl...ubjects-guide/
Universities are saying what they want. Is UCL not a top 10 university. Are you trying to make the university out to be liars by saying they prefer Law when they dont.
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ashtolga23
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To be honest the only reason a 4th A-Level subject may generally be useful is to give some flexibility because you can keep your options open and then drop the one you're least interested in. You sound pretty set so I think you'd be fine.
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swanseajack1
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You might be best using this which is the RGs latest advice. Years ago there was a belief in some places LSE in particular that went against Law A level. That hasnt been used by universities like say Bristol and Exeter amongst other for years,

https://www.informedchoices.ac.uk/
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