Being a Teenager in the 2000's

Watch
C1A
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#21
Report 1 week ago
#21
2020 and 2021 is much better than the 80s, 90s or early 200s. After the New World Order and Great Reset, it will get even better.
0
reply
A Rolling Stone
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#22
Report 1 week ago
#22
(Original post by janefitzjane)
Wasn't all it's cracked up to be. Playing N64 as a kid in the late 90s then spending all evening when I got home from school waiting for my friends to log onto MSN messenger, and you would wait all night for your friends to appear, and they might not.
you didn't love the suspense of your crush coming online with the MSN 'bing!' and then they would block/unblock you to get your attention haha
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#23
Report 1 week ago
#23
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
There are also quite a few people in this thread getting their timings wrong. People have said there was limited internet access and no or few phones by the 2000s, which isn't right. The Nokia/Snake craze started in 1998. Just about everyone had phones in the early 2000s, and nearly everyone had some sort of internet access by the end of the 90s, albeit it was dial up. It clearly wasn't as accessible as it is now (not by a long shot), but the people painting pictures of mobile and internet free existences are misremembering. That's early to mid 90s, not particularly the late 90s and definitely not the early 2000s. By then MSN Messenger and texting was absolutely massive, which obviously needed nearly everyone to have a phone and internet access.
Suspect it strongly depends on the socio-economic background (and country) you grew up in. My family didn't have internet until around 2002 (and we only had it because my step father worked in IT and needed it for work), and there were other kids in my class at the time and later who didn't have it. I also didn't get my first mobile until 2007 because my family couldn't afford for me to have one and even then, I didn't really use it for anything other than listening to music. So I can confirm that my 90s childhood was indeed Internet and mobile free.
0
reply
A Rolling Stone
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#24
Report 1 week ago
#24
(Original post by black tea)
Suspect it strongly depends on the socio-economic background (and country) you grew up in. My family didn't have internet until around 2002 (and we only had it because my step father worked in IT and needed it for work), and there were other kids in my class at the time and later who didn't have it. I also didn't get my first mobile until 2007 because my family couldn't afford for me to have one and even then, I didn't really use it for anything other than listening to music. So I can confirm that my 90s childhood was indeed Internet and mobile free.
i think 'most' kids did have Nokia phones but not internet in the 90s. internet became universal more like 2001-2003. i say 'most' as that's what it felt like, rather than what it actually was
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#25
Report 1 week ago
#25
(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
i think 'most' kids did have Nokia phones but not internet in the 90s. internet became universal more like 2001-2003. i say 'most' as that's what it felt like, rather than what it actually was
I was in primary school in the 90s and early 2000s and one one in my school had a phone. Perhaps things were different in more affluent areas though.
0
reply
Bandyb123
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#26
Report 6 days ago
#26
Have to admit I pity the current generation.

The internet wasn't super popular and mobiles were 'basic'. People spent more time with their real friends (in person) rather than online. We could pretty much say what we wanted, hardly anyone got offended. It was just a lot simpler, the human species hadn't evolved back then so we only had 2 genders to worry about.

If I wanted to play a game I just stuck in a disc, cartridge or CD and I was off. Now you have to sign up to god knows how many accounts, give away all your personal information and sell your soul....only to be given a buggy mess and bombarded with Ads for overpriced 'extras'.

We didn't have to worry about future employers knowing everything about us from a quick Google, and declining to employ us because we once fed a chicken a chicken nugget.

I was lucky enough to buy a house in my early 20's, it was something to look forward to. Now it is wishful thinking to most people.

I am genuinely concerned what things will be like in 10 years time when my son is at this age.

God I feel old....
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#27
Report 6 days ago
#27
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
There are also quite a few people in this thread getting their timings wrong. People have said there was limited internet access and no or few phones by the 2000s, which isn't right. The Nokia/Snake craze started in 1998. Just about everyone had phones in the early 2000s, and nearly everyone had some sort of internet access by the end of the 90s, albeit it was dial up. It clearly wasn't as accessible as it is now (not by a long shot), but the people painting pictures of mobile and internet free existences are misremembering. That's early to mid 90s, not particularly the late 90s and definitely not the early 2000s. By then MSN Messenger and texting was absolutely massive, which obviously needed nearly everyone to have a phone and internet access.
Didn't get my first mobile phone until 2005.

We had dialup internet installed in 2000 but I was one of the few amongst my friends. Did not get MSN until 2003.

I think really the OP should have specified between early/late 2000s as a lot changed throughout those 10 years.
0
reply
A Rolling Stone
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#28
Report 6 days ago
#28
(Original post by black tea)
I was in primary school in the 90s and early 2000s and one one in my school had a phone. Perhaps things were different in more affluent areas though.
ooff!
0
reply
gjd800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#29
Report 6 days ago
#29
(Original post by black tea)
I was in primary school in the 90s and early 2000s and one one in my school had a phone. Perhaps things were different in more affluent areas though.
I was in secondary school in a (govt approved!) deprived area back then and I reckon around here it was normal at 14 or 15 to have a 3310 or whatever but younger than that was unusual. This changed by the time my brother hit the same point in school around 5 years later, so 2005ish

I had Internet on my phone by probably 03, but it was crap. Even in 2009 I only had very basic Internet on my phones, and I only got a smartphone in 2012.
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#30
Report 6 days ago
#30
(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
i think 'most' kids did have Nokia phones but not internet in the 90s. internet became universal more like 2001-2003. i say 'most' as that's what it felt like, rather than what it actually was
I don’t remember any of my friends having their own mobile until around 2001 earliest. And we were in secondary school (year 9) by then. We were still ringing landlines to arrange hangouts in 2003!
Last edited by Reue; 6 days ago
0
reply
Crazy Jamie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#31
Report 6 days ago
#31
(Original post by Bandyb123)
The internet wasn't super popular and mobiles were 'basic'. People spent more time with their real friends (in person) rather than online. We could pretty much say what we wanted, hardly anyone got offended. It was just a lot simpler, the human species hadn't evolved back then so we only had 2 genders to worry about.
Had to laugh at the idea that no one got offended. Clearly I must have imagined 'political correctness' being used relentlessly by the right wing media in much the same way as 'anti-woke' is now.

If I wanted to play a game I just stuck in a disc, cartridge or CD and I was off. Now you have to sign up to god knows how many accounts, give away all your personal information and sell your soul....only to be given a buggy mess and bombarded with Ads for overpriced 'extras'.
I don't know if you're being deliberately hyperbolic here. I am all for physical media collections, but I assume you're not seriously suggesting that making your own mix tape or burning your own music CD was a better process than making playlists on Spotify? The accessibility of digital media nowadays is a clear benefit. The sheer amount of choice can be a negative and data rights are a major issue, but again if you know what you're doing it's something that can very easily be navigated.
We didn't have to worry about future employers knowing everything about us from a quick Google, and declining to employ us because we once fed a chicken a chicken nugget.
I'll give you that for all the benefits of social media, on the whole I do think it does a lot more harm than good, and I think it's something that will become more apparent as time goes on. I'm hoping by the time the next generation rolls around (which will include your son) they will be more educated on that in the same way that we were more educated on smoking. Which, come to think of it, is a massive negative to the 90s and early 2000s that no one ever mentions. Can't say I miss not being able to go out without coming home stinking of smoke.
I was lucky enough to buy a house in my early 20's, it was something to look forward to. Now it is wishful thinking to most people.
If you bought a house in your early 20s you must either be older than me or were making quite a lot of money by that stage. But either way, the current housing market is certainly something we can agree on as being a negative of modern times.


Reue black tea Easier to respond like this than to your posts individually, but clearly our experiences differ. Difficult to remember exact years, but very late 90s was everyone playing Snake for me, and everyone was on MSN Messenger probably around the summer of 2002 I think. I joined a major set of internet forums (which doesn't exist anymore) in early 2001. Not broadband then, but that's obviously earlier on both counts than your experiences. It may be there are some stats out there as to how widespread all of this was as time went on.
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#32
Report 6 days ago
#32
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
Reue black tea Easier to respond like this than to your posts individually, but clearly our experiences differ. Difficult to remember exact years, but very late 90s was everyone playing Snake for me, and everyone was on MSN Messenger probably around the summer of 2002 I think. I joined a major set of internet forums (which doesn't exist anymore) in early 2001. Not broadband then, but that's obviously earlier on both counts than your experiences. It may be there are some stats out there as to how widespread all of this was as time went on.
For us, MSN started being a thing in 2006-2007. In 2004-2005, we used ICQ (I know this wasn't really popular in the UK, but I introduced it to my group of friends and it took off in my school for a while), and a few of us also made forums that people from school would then go on to chat. Prior to then, any communication with friends outside school was mostly in person.
Last edited by black tea; 6 days ago
0
reply
Reue
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#33
Report 6 days ago
#33
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
Had to laugh at the idea that no one got offended. Clearly I must have imagined 'political correctness' being used relentlessly by the right wing media in much the same way as 'anti-woke' is now.


I don't know if you're being deliberately hyperbolic here. I am all for physical media collections, but I assume you're not seriously suggesting that making your own mix tape or burning your own music CD was a better process than making playlists on Spotify? The accessibility of digital media nowadays is a clear benefit. The sheer amount of choice can be a negative and data rights are a major issue, but again if you know what you're doing it's something that can very easily be navigated.

I'll give you that for all the benefits of social media, on the whole I do think it does a lot more harm than good, and I think it's something that will become more apparent as time goes on. I'm hoping by the time the next generation rolls around (which will include your son) they will be more educated on that in the same way that we were more educated on smoking. Which, come to think of it, is a massive negative to the 90s and early 2000s that no one ever mentions. Can't say I miss not being able to go out without coming home stinking of smoke.

If you bought a house in your early 20s you must either be older than me or were making quite a lot of money by that stage. But either way, the current housing market is certainly something we can agree on as being a negative of modern times.


Reue black tea Easier to respond like this than to your posts individually, but clearly our experiences differ. Difficult to remember exact years, but very late 90s was everyone playing Snake for me, and everyone was on MSN Messenger probably around the summer of 2002 I think. I joined a major set of internet forums (which doesn't exist anymore) in early 2001. Not broadband then, but that's obviously earlier on both counts than your experiences. It may be there are some stats out there as to how widespread all of this was as time went on.
I finished primary school in 1998 and there is absolutely no way any of the kids had a mobile phone then. Not even close.

Similarly I think you are too early with your MSN timescales.

I still remember someone asking me for MSN address at school in 2002 and having no idea what msn was.. and I was considered tech savvy back then!

We got MySpace in 2003/4 and I was one of the earliest adopters of Facebook in the UK in 2005/6 back when you needed a uni email address to register.
0
reply
Bandyb123
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#34
Report 6 days ago
#34
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
If you bought a house in your early 20s you must either be older than me or were making quite a lot of money by that stage. But either way, the current housing market is certainly something we can agree on as being a negative of modern times.
I bought my house in 2006 at the tender age of 24!
0
reply
Crazy Jamie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#35
Report 6 days ago
#35
(Original post by black tea)
For us, MSN started being a thing in 2006-2007. In 2004-2005, we used ICQ (I know this wasn't really popular in the UK, but I introduced it to my group of friends and it took off in my school for a while), and a few of us also made forums that people from school would then go on to chat. Prior to then, any communication with friends was mostly in person or occasionally on the phone (landline).
The difference here may well be country, as you alluded to earlier. I was still using MSN in 2006/07, but it was on its way out then really because you had Youtube and Facebook at that stage. Which country were you living in then, if you don't mind saying?

(Original post by Reue)
I finished primary school in 1998 and there is absolutely no way any of the kids had a mobile phone then. Not even close.

Similarly I think you are too early with your MSN timescales.

I still remember someone asking me for MSN address at school in 2002 and having no idea what msn was.. and I was considered tech savvy back then!

We got MySpace in 2003/4 and I was one of the earliest adopters of Facebook in the UK in 2005/6 back when you needed a uni email address to register.
I don't want to be picky, but it doesn't at all surprise me that none of the kids in your year had a mobile phone in 1998 because you were 11 years old, and unlike nowadays we can certainly agree that it wasn't usual for younger kids to have mobiles then. I'm a little older than you, and I promise both that Snake was a big thing in the very late 90s and that kids at my school and other schools in the area were using MSN Messenger very widely in the summer of 2002. I was definitely using it before that, but I can relate the stage I was at in school and the friends I had then to be sure that it was very widespread in 2002. Of course that is just my experience and not everyone is going to experience these things at the same time, but I do think the age gap explains some of this. MSN was bigger among older high school students, so again given your age it makes sense that you wouldn't have started using it until 2003. I'm pretty sure MSN Messenger launched in 1999, so it was definitely around earlier, just depends on when your particular friendship group(s) started using it.
0
reply
Crazy Jamie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#36
Report 6 days ago
#36
(Original post by Bandyb123)
I bought my house in 2006 at the tender age of 24!
Ah, so you are older than me and probably weren't doing badly, but even though the housing market then was hardly what it was in the 80s and 90s, it was much easier to secure borrowing at around that time, and indeed that rolled into the financial crash of 2008, at which point loads of properties went into negative equity (hopefully not yours) and it suddenly became much more difficult to borrow in the same way. So yes, you got in before the housing market changed drastically and became far less accessible to first time buyers.
0
reply
xxx0xxxo
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#37
Report 6 days ago
#37
The relevance of the technology is that our conception of time altogether was probably radically different to what teens have today. My teen years before tech took over our daily lives are the last memories of some major shift in everyday life and I can’t explain it better than this unfortunately. But you are missing out on some type of ‘reality’ and innocence (lack of clear self scrutiny) that young people had for longer in my view
0
reply
black tea
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#38
Report 6 days ago
#38
(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
The difference here may well be country, as you alluded to earlier. I was still using MSN in 2006/07, but it was on its way out then really because you had Youtube and Facebook at that stage. Which country were you living in then, if you don't mind saying?
England
0
reply
da_nolo
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#39
Report 6 days ago
#39
who says it was iconic?
everyone thinks their time as youth were great (with some exceptions) or get joyed from nostalgia. thats why so many shows have popped up about those eras. like about toys from the 80's.

I missed the days when a computer was half a room.
Last edited by da_nolo; 6 days ago
0
reply
Crazy Jamie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#40
Report 6 days ago
#40
(Original post by black tea)
England
Oh, completely misread your last post. In which case I can only fall back on age again. If you were only using MSN in 2006 I assume you weren't at university then, which again can explain some of the discrepancy (assuming I'm right about that, which given my last post there's every chance I'm not).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made your mind up on your five uni choices?

Yes, and I've sent off my application! (126)
57.01%
I've made my choices but havent sent my application yet (25)
11.31%
I've got a good idea about the choices I want to make (27)
12.22%
I'm researching but still not sure which universities I want to apply to (19)
8.6%
I haven't started researching yet (11)
4.98%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (13)
5.88%

Watched Threads

View All