Hijikata
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
I contacted an advisor today and was told that they do not know if a bursary would be available for the 2022-2023 year. Given that this year's cohort received an alarmingly slender figure of £0, is it realistic to assume that the state will rectify their egregious mistake? Apparently, we should be finding out within a few weeks.....
0
reply
bluebeetle
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
(Original post by Hijikata)
I contacted an advisor today and was told that they do not know if a bursary would be available for the 2022-2023 year. Given that this year's cohort received an alarmingly slender figure of £0, is it realistic to assume that the state will rectify their egregious mistake? Apparently, we should be finding out within a few weeks.....
My personal opinion is that it's unlikely that many (or any) of the subjects that lost their bursary will get it back, as the general trend over the past couple of years has been going down instead of up for most subjects. It's really just a matter of waiting and seeing.

In the meantime, you can think about your other options financially. You can still get a maintenance loan and tuition fee from student finance, which should help. I know some people on my course who were entering the PGCE straight from uni spent the summer working while living at home to save up - obviously this is not a viable option for many people, but it's something to consider if it's viable for you. There was also a post on here recently about the bursaries for FE teacher training, and apparently they have had a bursary available for English this year - I don't know much about that, but it could be something to look into: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...e-2021-to-2022
0
reply
Hijikata
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by bluebeetle)
My personal opinion is that it's unlikely that many (or any) of the subjects that lost their bursary will get it back, as the general trend over the past couple of years has been going down instead of up for most subjects. It's really just a matter of waiting and seeing.

In the meantime, you can think about your other options financially. You can still get a maintenance loan and tuition fee from student finance, which should help. I know some people on my course who were entering the PGCE straight from uni spent the summer working while living at home to save up - obviously this is not a viable option for many people, but it's something to consider if it's viable for you. There was also a post on here recently about the bursaries for FE teacher training, and apparently they have had a bursary available for English this year - I don't know much about that, but it could be something to look into: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...e-2021-to-2022
Thanks for the informative post! Would upvote but apparently, I have to spread rep more liberally first. Sadly, I do agree with your analysis and conclusion. Will check out the link.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by Hijikata)
I contacted an advisor today and was told that they do not know if a bursary would be available for the 2022-2023 year. Given that this year's cohort received an alarmingly slender figure of £0, is it realistic to assume that the state will rectify their egregious mistake? Apparently, we should be finding out within a few weeks.....
2022 bursaries have been released: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...r-2022-to-2023

There's nothing for English.

I don't understand why you think there's a mistake? Bursaries are for subjects where recruitment targets aren't being met. That isn't the case for English at the moment.
0
reply
Hijikata
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#5
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
2022 bursaries have been released: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...r-2022-to-2023

There's nothing for English.

I don't understand why you think there's a mistake? Bursaries are for subjects where recruitment targets aren't being met. That isn't the case for English at the moment.
I'm of the view that government recruitment targets shouldn't be the primary, or at least the only basis for this. There is a huge literacy problem in this country and the removal of bursaries for English will further deter the more financially worse off in society from pursuing a PGCE.

Thanks for the update though!
Last edited by Hijikata; 1 week ago
0
reply
hotpud
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by Hijikata)
I contacted an advisor today and was told that they do not know if a bursary would be available for the 2022-2023 year. Given that this year's cohort received an alarmingly slender figure of £0, is it realistic to assume that the state will rectify their egregious mistake? Apparently, we should be finding out within a few weeks.....
When I did my PGCE 5 years ago, the course leader said that bursaries tend to oppose the economy. When the economy is booming and jobs are a plenty, bursaries go up to attract people into teaching. When things go bad, bursaries disappear as people clamour to get into the relatively safe career of teaching.

That said, staff retention and wellbeing are now one of the factors that schools are judged on by ofsted so the days of burning teachers out after 4 years and then getting in a new crop may well be changing.
1
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by Hijikata)
I'm of the view that government recruitment targets shouldn't be the primary, or at least the only basis for this. There is a huge literacy problem in this country and the removal of bursaries for English will further deter the more financially worse off in society from pursuing a PGCE.

Thanks for the update though!
That's fair enough, and to an extent I do agree- there's definitely an argument for proper funding or a bursary for all subjects to make training accessible to all.

But the fact that the bursaries don't work that way and there isn't one for English, I wouldn't say is a mistake, more a concious decision. To me, a mistake implies it's been done accidentally?

I also wouldn't say that the issues with literacy in the UK/England (which I do agree are an issue) are solved by recruiting more English teachers alone- problems with lack of literacy obviously start in primary school, and for some students, any intervention at secondary school will be too late. The English curriculum itself also doesn't lend itself well to students with low literacy (IMO as a secondary teacher of a different subject).
0
reply
gjd800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
That's fair enough, and to an extent I do agree- there's definitely an argument for proper funding or a bursary for all subjects to make training accessible to all.

But the fact that the bursaries don't work that way and there isn't one for English, I wouldn't say is a mistake, more a concious decision. To me, a mistake implies it's been done accidentally?

I also wouldn't say that the issues with literacy in the UK/England (which I do agree are an issue) are solved by recruiting more English teachers alone- problems with lack of literacy obviously start in primary school, and for some students, any intervention at secondary school will be too late. The English curriculum itself also doesn't lend itself well to students with low literacy (IMO as a secondary teacher of a different subject).
I think a lack of parental literacy is also a big driver, and govts has traditionally been quite reluctant to take on that particular problem
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by gjd800)
I think a lack of parental literacy is also a big driver, and govts has traditionally been quite reluctant to take on that particular problem
I think a lack of parental literacy is definitely a huge contributory factor, and because it's embarassing for many people, they often won't share this with the school, so the school is not always aware of the limits to how parents can support at home. Also, in some cases, parents who are highly literate in their home/native language, but their literacy is not as strong in English.

Personally, I think there needs to be proper funding for targetted intervention at primary and in the early years of secondary, but even by Y8 or 9, I think it can be difficult to make a meaningful difference- because by that stage the student is often very low in confidence and that barrier has to be overcome before they can engage with any specialist intervention.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made your mind up on your five uni choices?

Yes, and I've sent off my application! (310)
57.94%
I've made my choices but havent sent my application yet (75)
14.02%
I've got a good idea about the choices I want to make (59)
11.03%
I'm researching but still not sure which universities I want to apply to (45)
8.41%
I haven't started researching yet (26)
4.86%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (20)
3.74%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed