thomas.rhett
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How do you describe the organization of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell wall and how this organization is related to its properties? Past edexcel IAL marks schemes describe microfibrils parallel to one another in layers for flexibility and mesh of microfibrils in secondary cell wall for strength. How does "layers" fit into the idea of a "mesh"? Are microfibrils parallel within a layer and at a different angle to one another in adjacent/different layers? Thanks.
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bette4545
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(Original post by thomas.rhett)
How do you describe the organization of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell wall and how this organization is related to its properties? Past edexcel IAL marks schemes describe microfibrils parallel to one another in layers for flexibility and mesh of microfibrils in secondary cell wall for strength. How does "layers" fit into the idea of a "mesh"? Are microfibrils parallel within a layer and at a different angle to one another in adjacent/different layers? Thanks.
You can imagine long, planes of layers. Each plane/layer is a 'string' of cellulose fibres, and these are parallel to each other plane/layer. Forming myofibrils, they sort of 'move' along eachother. Try think of a layered, crepe cake????

Mesh just relates to the strength of layers, so because of the hydrogen bonds connecting the cellulose molecules, it forms quite a rigid layer structure. This rigidity alludes to the idea of a 'mesh', which has some sort of useful resistance in this case- for a cell wall's stability.
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chris01928
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(Original post by thomas.rhett)
How do you describe the organization of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell wall and how this organization is related to its properties? Past edexcel IAL marks schemes describe microfibrils parallel to one another in layers for flexibility and mesh of microfibrils in secondary cell wall for strength. How does "layers" fit into the idea of a "mesh"? Are microfibrils parallel within a layer and at a different angle to one another in adjacent/different layers? Thanks.
Cellulose are long strands of beta-glucose which are parallel to eachother that form a 'mesh' of hydrogen bonds to adjacent strands, this forms an incredible song, water-permeable mesh. The link below shows it very well(look at the top left one)

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/...fig3_283339857
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