Zian101
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
Hi. I have good GCSE's poor A levels (DDD). I took a gap year to resit two of them and picked up and extra subject and ended up getting a DDD again lol. But after that I sorted myself out and done a foundation year at my uni and got 80% and now I'm on track for getting a 2:1 for my Physics degree. I have classroom experience and so more dates for which I planned to attend but other than that would unis such as uom or even ucl see those A levels as a concern. I admit my work ethic and just mentality wasn't the best and I made my mistakes but I sorted myself out and I am trying my best now and I found my passion in teaching this subject. Any advice would be appreciated
0
reply
Eus997
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
(Original post by Zian101)
Hi. I have good GCSE's poor A levels (DDD). I took a gap year to resit two of them and picked up and extra subject and ended up getting a DDD again lol. But after that I sorted myself out and done a foundation year at my uni and got 80% and now I'm on track for getting a 2:1 for my Physics degree. I have classroom experience and so more dates for which I planned to attend but other than that would unis such as uom or even ucl see those A levels as a concern. I admit my work ethic and just mentality wasn't the best and I made my mistakes but I sorted myself out and I am trying my best now and I found my passion in teaching this subject. Any advice would be appreciated
Hi Zian,
Firstly, congratulations on being on track for a 2:1! That's an immense achievement! To answer your question, it will depend on which University you apply for. If your GCSEs are strong enough and you have a good transcript from university, I don't see why they wouldn't accept you. You may want to find a way to explain these results if questioned that makes you seem self-aware and proactive. For example, you want to apply for the PGCE because you're passionate about preparing students for A levels and ensuring that they don't struggle or underachieve for their academic ability as you have first hand experience of that.

It also depends what level you intend on teaching. If you're going to be a primary school teacher, it's not going to make a tremendous amount of difference. You may also want to consider trying to get some work after your degree as a part time tutor and see if you would like to pursue this career path. Having relevant experience under your belt may strengthen your applications!
Good Luck
Last edited by Eus997; 1 week ago
0
reply
Zian101
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
(Original post by Eus997)
Hi Zian,
Firstly, congratulations on being on track for a 2:1! That's an immense achievement! To answer your question, it will depend on which University you apply for. If your GCSEs are strong enough and you have a good transcript from university, I don't see why they wouldn't accept you. You may want to find a way to explain these results if questioned that makes you seem self-aware and proactive. For example, you want to apply for the PGCE because you're passionate about preparing students for A levels and ensuring that they don't struggle or underachieve for their academic ability as you have first hand experience of that.

It also depends what level you intend on teaching. If you're going to be a primary school teacher, it's not going to make a tremendous amount of difference. You may also want to consider trying to get some work after your degree as a part time tutor and see if you would like to pursue this career path. Having relevant experience under your belt may strengthen your applications!
Good Luck
Hi Eus997
Thank you! I want to teach physics at the secondary level so that's why I was concerned and so I thought perhaps that foundation year could be looked at more than my A levels but definitely I am working on getting as much experience before applying as possible. It was actually my good Physics teachers who made me keep pursuing this path in Physics and I felt that if it wasn't for them I would have given up by the end of that gap year. I was looking into tutoring as well so I will also be doing that too!
0
reply
Spla917
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
(Original post by Zian101)
Hi Eus997
Thank you! I want to teach physics at the secondary level so that's why I was concerned and so I thought perhaps that foundation year could be looked at more than my A levels but definitely I am working on getting as much experience before applying as possible. It was actually my good Physics teachers who made me keep pursuing this path in Physics and I felt that if it wasn't for them I would have given up by the end of that gap year. I was looking into tutoring as well so I will also be doing that too!
Damn what subjects did you resit and what uni did you get into. I'm kind of in the same situation as you but I'm currently prepping for my a level resit as I got a CCE In year 13. I've decided to retake Bio(C) and chem(E) this summer in my gap year. What mistakes and what advice would you give to a resitting student? Thanks
0
reply
Zian101
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#5
(Original post by Spla917)
Damn what subjects did you resit and what uni did you get into. I'm kind of in the same situation as you but I'm currently prepping for my a level resit as I got a CCE In year 13. I've decided to retake Bio(C) and chem(E) this summer in my gap year. What mistakes and what advice would you give to a resitting student? Thanks
I’ve resat Maths and physics and picked up further maths. Honestly speaking it was procrastination. I repeated the same mistakes that I’ve done back in school which made my life really hard when it came to exam season because I really didn’t know anything and this fear kept putting me off from working which became a vicious cycle. This along with the fact that I was on my own this time around and didn’t have school to constantly go everyday made it even harder. You really need good discipline and habit to be successful as an independent learner. Even if you start off studying a little a day, it really does go a long way. Eventually as you build the habit, studying doesn’t seem as daunting anymore and u start to increase the pace more easily.

Understanding the nature of how self reliant you had to be in the gap year made me cope better when I started university. I told myself if I can do the very bare minimum of at least attending the lectures and paying attention and taking notes, I would have an easier time when I’m on my own on my desk. Eventually I got into the habit and rewarded myself for the small accomplishments.

The hardest part truly is starting and I would highly suggest to focus on ur weaker areas first and then move up to the easier stuff. Do as many past papers as you can to really familiarise urself with the exam and getting ur timings in check. But in the end of the day don’t overwork yourself but don’t underwork yourself either. A balance of working and just chilling really helps to rejuvenise yourself. Best of luck
1
reply
Spla917
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 days ago
#6
(Original post by Zian101)
I’ve resat Maths and physics and picked up further maths. Honestly speaking it was procrastination. I repeated the same mistakes that I’ve done back in school which made my life really hard when it came to exam season because I really didn’t know anything and this fear kept putting me off from working which became a vicious cycle. This along with the fact that I was on my own this time around and didn’t have school to constantly go everyday made it even harder. You really need good discipline and habit to be successful as an independent learner. Even if you start off studying a little a day, it really does go a long way. Eventually as you build the habit, studying doesn’t seem as daunting anymore and u start to increase the pace more easily.

Understanding the nature of how self reliant you had to be in the gap year made me cope better when I started university. I told myself if I can do the very bare minimum of at least attending the lectures and paying attention and taking notes, I would have an easier time when I’m on my own on my desk. Eventually I got into the habit and rewarded myself for the small accomplishments.

The hardest part truly is starting and I would highly suggest to focus on ur weaker areas first and then move up to the easier stuff. Do as many past papers as you can to really familiarise urself with the exam and getting ur timings in check. But in the end of the day don’t overwork yourself but don’t underwork yourself either. A balance of working and just chilling really helps to rejuvenise yourself. Best of luck
That’s exactly what I done this year. I procrastinated a lot hence why I wanted to change my ways whiles preparing for next years exams. I’ve made a timetable and will try my best to stick to it, it’ll be tough but worth it at the end. Thanks for advice and with all the best too
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 days ago
#7
(Original post by Zian101)
Hi. I have good GCSE's poor A levels (DDD). I took a gap year to resit two of them and picked up and extra subject and ended up getting a DDD again lol. But after that I sorted myself out and done a foundation year at my uni and got 80% and now I'm on track for getting a 2:1 for my Physics degree. I have classroom experience and so more dates for which I planned to attend but other than that would unis such as uom or even ucl see those A levels as a concern. I admit my work ethic and just mentality wasn't the best and I made my mistakes but I sorted myself out and I am trying my best now and I found my passion in teaching this subject. Any advice would be appreciated
I doubt any uni is in a real position to pick and chose Physics PGCE applicants in that way, so you will likely find a place to train. Whether that's UCL or UoM, I don't know, but where you train to teach is honestly not that important.

BTW, I disagree with the previous poster- primary teaching is much more competative and I think your A-levels would be a concern there.

Your A-levels may have an impact on finding a job after the PGCE, but again many schools are crying out for Physics specialists, so I am sure you will find a job.

Personally, I think it should not matter- particularly if you did your A-levels a long time ago, but I know there are some people (e.g. Muttley79 - hope you don't mind the tag) who feel it does/will.
0
reply
Scotney
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 days ago
#8
gjd800 can you advise here?
0
reply
gjd800
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 days ago
#9
(Original post by Scotney)
gjd800 can you advise here?
Thanks for the tag

I think Sarc has it nailed on tbh. My A Levels aren't much better than yours (and I really mean that!), OP, and I did a PGCE - I mitigated it with 3 degrees, though, so people don't really look at my CV and think 'crap A levels' (thank god), they look and think 'oh, a PhD'. I'm not a scientist, which might make some sort of difference.

I'm inclined to think you'd be ok for the training and a job - you could certainly explain the results in an interview, and you could point to your degree as evidence that you have upped your game
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 days ago
#10
(Original post by Zian101)
I’ve resat Maths and physics and picked up further maths. Honestly speaking it was procrastination. I repeated the same mistakes that I’ve done back in school which made my life really hard when it came to exam season because I really didn’t know anything and this fear kept putting me off from working which became a vicious cycle. This along with the fact that I was on my own this time around and didn’t have school to constantly go everyday made it even harder.
A strong degree is the first thing we look for and a good lesson/interview. In a selective school I would be concerned about two resits AND low grades. However a strong PGCE reference would encourage me to call you for interview/lesson obs. I think you could expect a question about those grades and if you are able to reflect on how you've changed then they would probably be OK. In fact I could see how you could turn this into a positive to motivate those lazy Sixthformers ....
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 days ago
#11
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I doubt any uni is in a real position to pick and chose Physics PGCE applicants in that way, so you will likely find a place to train. Whether that's UCL or UoM, I don't know, but where you train to teach is honestly not that important.

BTW, I disagree with the previous poster- primary teaching is much more competative and I think your A-levels would be a concern there.

Your A-levels may have an impact on finding a job after the PGCE, but again many schools are crying out for Physics specialists, so I am sure you will find a job.

Personally, I think it should not matter- particularly if you did your A-levels a long time ago, but I know there are some people (e.g. Muttley79 - hope you don't mind the tag) who feel it does/will.
PRSOM
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made your mind up on your five uni choices?

Yes, and I've sent off my application! (192)
55.65%
I've made my choices but havent sent my application yet (48)
13.91%
I've got a good idea about the choices I want to make (39)
11.3%
I'm researching but still not sure which universities I want to apply to (32)
9.28%
I haven't started researching yet (19)
5.51%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (15)
4.35%

Watched Threads

View All