Is it even worth attempting to pursue a career as a corporate barrister?

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BendoesTSR
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So to give content, I’m only in year 11 and on track for good gcse results. For a while I’ve been very interested in corporate/commercial law and also feel that a barrister would be a great job to do. So a corporate/commercial barrister.

But recently, I discovered just how difficult it is to obtain pupilage and tenancy, let alone for a practise area like this.

So firstly, is it worth even pursuing this career given the difficultly?

And secondly, what would I need to do in the next few years to make me stand out and get my application accepted?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by BendoesTSR)
But recently, I discovered just how difficult it is to obtain pupilage and tenancy, let alone for a practise area like this.
Surely anything worthwhile is difficult to do/obtain and that in itself isn't a reason to not even try, which is what your thread title seems to suggest you might consider doing?
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Surely anything worthwhile is difficult to do/obtain and that in itself isn't a reason to not even try, which is what your thread title seems to suggest you might consider doing?
Precisely this. Good, prestigious jobs where you can make a good living to tend to be in demand to one degree or another. Something being difficult is not a reason not to attempt it. Becoming a barrister is not easy and it's a very competitive industry, but plenty of people do manage it every year. The key is assessing your own ability and the prospective strength of your application, and deciding whether you have a realistic shot at it. You then weigh other factors, such as the time and money it would take to try, and decide whether or not it's a risk that you want to take.

As for things that you can do to stand out in the next few years, very little because you are 15/16 years old. In three years you'll be in the first year of your undergraduate degree (assuming you don't take a gap year), and with the best will in the world you just cannot have done all that much in that context that can make you stand out. You don't even need to decide whether or not you want to pursue pupillage yet. My advice would be to continue to inform yourself about this career path, as well as pursuing other interests you have. Your priority should be to do well in your GCSEs, and then to pick A-Levels that interest you and that you can get good grades in (the exact subjects matter very little for a legal career; your grades are the important part). You then decide whether to do a law degree, or do a degree in a different subject and aim to do the GDL (again, it doesn't matter which route you take, and all things being equal I would advise you to pursue a different undergraduate degree if you have an interest in a different area, with grades being incredibly important as before).

It's only after your undergraduate degree/GDL that you definitively need to decide whether or not you want to aim for pupillage, because that's when you decide whether or not to do the Bar course. So you have plenty of time. If it is something that you continue to have an interest in you will get far more opportunities to pursue relevant experiences at university in the form mooting, debating, mini pupillages, marshalling and so on. You have far more limited options when you're in school, not least because nearly all sets require you to be a university student before offering mini pupillages, and I expect most judges approach marshalling the same way. There are still things you can do in terms of extra curriculars in school that may have relevant to your application. Your school might have a debating society, or put on plays, or offer one of many other opportunities where you can develop relevant skills. But this is as much about developing your interests and developing you as a person (if not more) as it is aiming for a particular career at your age. Do inform yourself about this career and do make sure that you get the grades you need, but also pursue your own interests.
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BendoesTSR
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Thank you, this is very helpful.
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17Student17
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Also look at the CVs (which are all online) for the best London barrister's chambers newest barristers eg those called from around 2018 or 2019 so you can see what they had to do. eg Erskine Chambers which I use and which does a lot of company law has the barristers under People and you would need to click on the CV for the younger people to see. Brick Court Chambers which I also use is the same. That will tell you where people took their degrees, what they achieved etc etc.
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