EFranc645
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You just press a keyboard, its quite sad tbh.
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artful_lounger
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As someone who had to take a programming course as a core module I can say that I found it very boring and tedious

Anyway it's popular because people think it will lead them to earn tons of money as a developer when in reality that isn't true for most people and the rise in popularity has led to the market of job applicants for those roles being flooded with new grads in the subject, increasing competition for those roles and decreasing wages offered for them as those skills become more and more "expected" for many grads (in many roles).
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cvgk
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computer science is every where, your credit card, oyster , mobile phone, computer etc...
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by EFranc645)
You just press a keyboard, its quite sad tbh.
Hey there,

I'm in my final year of Computer Science. For me, I find that Computer Science is a broad discipline that allows you to venture into many different careers post-graduation. Not everything is on the "clicky clacky keyboard" side - there is a broad spectrum between the heavily technical and the heavily business/people-focussed career paths.

On the heavily technical side - you may have the Software Developers, the Computer Scientists, Machine Learning/Artificial Intelligence researchers. These are the people that enjoy going deep into what makes technology work from base principles.

In the middle, you may have the Software Engineers, the Teachers, the Developer Advocates, the Analysts, the Architects, all of the people that need to think not just about the technology but the who, what, why, where, when and how of how that technology is used. Even the most technical developer needs to be backed by a strong team of people that are able to elicit requirements from the end users, build strong user stories and communicate between developers and users within a given context. When there are many different technologies that could solve our problem, which one do we select? The cheapest? The most maintainable? The one that matches our existing project best? Where are the tradeoffs? Are there security concerns?

On the more business side - we have the Consultants, the Directors, the Business Integrators, UI/UX designers, all of the people that need to research the technology that is available but also fully understand the needs of their business, the market, trends, the end user, and be able to put forward a case for how we use technology in the real world. A business may have the most technically brilliant solution to a problem, but if nobody can use it or if our user base is too small, that business will fail unless it adapts.

Hope this gives you a wider perspective on the entire Computer Science discipline. For sure, it started with great Mathematicians but the field has evolved beyond that, and continues to do so.

~ Mikael, UoP Student Rep
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