karl pilkington
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Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?
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ecolier
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?
Pretty easy answer:

(1) Students with doctors in the family do get "insider information" e.g how to get work experience, how to excel at interviews

(2) Doctors are likely to encourage their next generation to also do medicine; equally growing up with a doctor parent may inspire that person to do medicine

(3) Many ethnic minority groups prefer their children to be doctors, and may have doctors in the family too

(4) Doctors usually have the resources for their children to have a good education

etc.

Saying that, we are doing a lot to address this - widening participation, work experience courses for under-privileged students etc.

I myself am the first doctor (and indeed any healthcare professional) in my family, and now I help by providing advice here and also IRL to people who may not have help from family members who are in the "business".
Last edited by ecolier; 1 month ago
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CatInTheCorner
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?
I can't speak for the rest of the post, but family doctors are usually an inspiration because you get to see the contributions they make and learn about what they do. I reckon if everyone shadowed a doctor we'd have a lot more applications to med school!
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Democracy
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?

It's a pretty engrossing degree and career. Chances are you may meet your partner at medical school or junior doctor years. After that your kids may grow up seeing their parents doing very similar jobs which take up a lot of their time. Early exposure leads to personal interest and it develops from there.

It's probably no different to acting, music, or the armed forces.
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rzi999
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Think of it this way: children with doctors in the family grow up around the culture of that profession and have their whole early life to learn about it at the dinner table so when it gets to applying.. they sound a lot more clued up on the realities of being a doctor (as well as the insider info about current topics in the field) mainly because they are. They receive free and unconditional mentoring from loved ones who i imagine are far more involved with their learning and development than say for a first gen med applicant with no family links who maybe gets a few weeks of volunteer work with doctors that don’t know them or their story very well. Children of doctors can easily ‘fall into’ the career simply because of all of the help around them to direct them with how to apply, how to answer questions, explore specific passions. Stuff like that is priceless.
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Democracy
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Honestly a lot of doctors actively try and put their children off from pursuing a career in medicine.
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hungrysalamander
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I might be an exception as I'm the first healthcare professional (dental student) in my family
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karl pilkington
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(Original post by Democracy)
Honestly a lot of doctors actively try and put their children off from pursuing a career in medicine.
yes but a lot will also tell them how good it is and pressure them into it also a lot will go to private school have extra tuition etc
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Democracy
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
yes but a lot will also tell them how good it is and pressure them into it also a lot will go to private school have extra tuition etc
Okay so like lots of other middle class families then.
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karl pilkington
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(Original post by Democracy)
Okay so like lots of other middle class families then.
but with the added benefit of admissions help work experience etc
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Helenia
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
but with the added benefit of admissions help work experience etc
Not always that helpful - they'll have got into med school 20+ years previously and may not have much of a clue about current admissions policies. Certainly my friends (I applied 20 years ago) who aren't actively involved in admissions/teaching/helping online on places like TSR are not up to speed with how universities are doing it these days. I wouldn't say that bit particularly is a huge advantage, though all the other points already made about being able to provide a supportive environment very much stand.

I'm not from a medical family. I do have a cousin a year older than me who is also a doctor, but we didn't have much/anything to do with each other's careers. I did go to private school though. Definitely wouldn't push my kids in to medicine but if they wanted to do it I would obviously help them with it. I'd help them with any sensible career aspirations, I am probably more useful for medicine though!
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InArduisFouette
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(Original post by rzi999)
Think of it this way: children with doctors in the family grow up around the culture of that profession and have their whole early life to learn about it at the dinner table so when it gets to applying.. they sound a lot more clued up on the realities of being a doctor (as well as the insider info about current topics in the field) mainly because they are. They receive free and unconditional mentoring from loved ones who i imagine are far more involved with their learning and development than say for a first gen med applicant with no family links who maybe gets a few weeks of volunteer work with doctors that don’t know them or their story very well. Children of doctors can easily ‘fall into’ the career simply because of all of the help around them to direct them with how to apply, how to answer questions, explore specific passions. Stuff like that is priceless.
not Medicine but that sounds very like a number of the 2nd and 3rd generation professional dancers i know as well ( although there is a clear genetic aspect esp if both mum and dad are/ were dancers )
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?
You can also say exactly the same for trades. Miners, builders, plumbers, carpenters, many craft trades etc.

Any parents who hold down a long-term job can give their kids insider information about how to ace the application and interview process, the key things to say, important habits to adopt, the times to apply, etc.
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karl pilkington
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
You can also say exactly the same for trades. Miners, builders, plumbers, carpenters, many craft trades etc.

Any parents who hold down a long-term job can give their kids insider information about how to ace the application and interview process, the key things to say, important habits to adopt, the times to apply, etc.
no but they are not difficult to get into nor particularly desirable occupations to a lot of people
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
no but they are not difficult to get into nor particularly desirable occupations to a lot of people
But that's not relevant to your question. You can't stop parental relationships working the way they work just because some provide more popular benefits (at least by your perspective) than others.
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karl pilkington
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
But that's not relevant to your question. You can't stop parental relationships working the way they work just because some provide more popular benefits (at least by your perspective) than others.
I wasn't saying it was parental relationships more insider help and unfair admissions practices that could explain it.
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ecolier
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
I wasn't saying it was parental relationships more insider help and unfair admissions practices that could explain it.
How would you make admissions fairer then?

Doctors are always going to be involved in it, and they will always know more about the system.

Perhaps we should make it about pure luck? Draw lots, or pick random numbers or something?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
I wasn't saying it was parental relationships more insider help and unfair admissions practices that could explain it.
What 'insider help'?
What 'unfair admissions practices'?

I can't think of another university course which has admissions information and data which is more transparent, more accessible and more analysed than medicine. Can you?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Reality Check)
What 'insider help'?
What 'unfair admissions practices'?

I can't think of another university course which has admissions information and data which is more transparent, more accessible and more analysed than medicine. Can you?
PRSOM!
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concernedLMAO
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(Original post by karl pilkington)
Seems like a lot of people in medical school have parents aunties etc who are GPs etc. They go to private schools and have inside information etc I am not criticizing them because they just want the best for themselves but has anyone noticed this?
Agree with what everyone else has said(particularly ecolier) but a few more "controversial" ideas:

A lot of people are going to want to be as successful as their parents, and a lot of parents will want their kids to be as successful as them. If your parents are both doctors you have very limited career options, medicine, investment banking, programmer at google, uni professor, top lawyer... that's about it. With so few to choose from it's much more likely someone will pick medicine than someone whose parents are chronically unemployed who has far, far more options available to avoid being considered the family black sheep.

If both your parents are doctors you're probably going to be much brighter than most people which will help with actually getting in to the most competitive careers including medicine.

These careers seem far more achievable when you know plenty of people who've actually done it, and this confidence gets people to go for them in the first place.
Last edited by concernedLMAO; 1 month ago
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