adamamz
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#1
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#1
I have my heart set on a specific uni, however I’m not sure whether it’s worth sacrificing an option to apply to the uni for 2 different courses. Any advice?
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Chi chi5
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#2
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#2
Hello, i think it depends on which courses you are applying for, what you want to do after graduation and how your stats compare to their entry requirements.
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Cote1
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#3
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#3
You can only choose 2 when you finally accept. You need an insurance one (hopefully one you would be happy to attend).
Last edited by Cote1; 1 month ago
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Cote1
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#4
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#4
It may also depend on whether you are genuinely keen to do either course and on the content of the courses and if there are four other universities you would consider that you would like to attend. I am not saying don't do it but it is easy to become focused on one particular university and you may change your mind later. Also, at this stage you don't know where you will be happiest.
Last edited by Cote1; 1 month ago
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McGinger
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#5
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#5
Yes you can apply for two different courses at the same Uni.
However if they are wildy different subjects how are you going to write a convincng PS that covers both?
If its 'Politics' and 'Politocs with Sociolgy' its doable - but totally different subjects (Politics and Film Studies) will not work.

Also, remember if the two degrees are just different 'pathway' degrees (with Study Abroad or MSci etc) in exactly the same subject they will have a common first year, and you may not be increasing your chances of an offer at all.
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PQ
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#6
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#6
While this is allowed it’s usually not a good idea - if the courses are similar then swapping between them will usually be simple, if they’re different then you weaken your application for both by showing uncertainty about your choices.
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justlearning1469
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#7
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#7
(Original post by PQ)
While this is allowed it’s usually not a good idea - if the courses are similar then swapping between them will usually be simple, if they’re different then you weaken your application for both by showing uncertainty about your choices.
I mean that is true.

But to be fair it's pretty difficult to choose between courses for universities.
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Year12Studentt
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#8
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#8
(Original post by PQ)
While this is allowed it’s usually not a good idea - if the courses are similar then swapping between them will usually be simple, if they’re different then you weaken your application for both by showing uncertainty about your choices.
I have to disagree with this slightly. I took this advice last year but was thinking of applying to PPE and Politics and Economics at the same uni. I was told to only apply for one (PPE) and was offered a place on the Politics course instead. I asked to change to Politics and Economics but by that time it was too late and all courses were filled, but I was told had I applied for Politics and Economics my application would have been successful. It all depends on the uni tbh.
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PQ
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#9
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#9
(Original post by justlearning1469)
I mean that is true.

But to be fair it's pretty difficult to choose between courses for universities.
(Original post by Year12Studentt)
I have to disagree with this slightly. I took this advice last year but was thinking of applying to PPE and Politics and Economics at the same uni. I was told to only apply for one (PPE) and was offered a place on the Politics course instead. I asked to change to Politics and Economics but by that time it was too late and all courses were filled, but I was told had I applied for Politics and Economics my application would have been successful. It all depends on the uni tbh.
Yes - but you have to choose a single choice eventually. It’s best to apply for the one course you really want from the start (and if you aren’t sure then hold off and apply later closer to the deadline instead of applying early for a course you change your mind about).
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justlearning1469
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#10
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#10
(Original post by PQ)
Yes - but you have to choose a single choice eventually. It’s best to apply for the one course you really want from the start (and if you aren’t sure then hold off and apply later closer to the deadline instead of applying early for a course you change your mind about).
I mean you're right. Though it is pretty difficult to lock off a lot of career options.

The OP should apply for a flexible degree choice, if the OP is really unsure (which I can totally understand)
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PQ
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#11
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#11
(Original post by justlearning1469)
I mean you're right. Though it is pretty difficult to lock off a lot of career options.

The OP should apply for a flexible degree choice, if the OP is really unsure (which I can totally understand)
I would say often a gap year and getting some experience in work or volunteering is a better choice than a flexible degree if someone is genuinely split between courses.

(Although there’s some excellent courses with flexibility built into the course structure - there’s also a lot that try to be jack of all trades and end up with graduates trying to enter competitive industries without the advantage of specialist skills they would have from a more focused degree).

Starting university at 19, 20 or 21 isn’t a disadvantage.
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justlearning1469
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#12
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#12
(Original post by PQ)
I would say often a gap year and getting some experience in work or volunteering is a better choice than a flexible degree if someone is genuinely split between courses.

(Although there’s some excellent courses with flexibility built into the course structure - there’s also a lot that try to be jack of all trades and end up with graduates trying to enter competitive industries without the advantage of specialist skills they would have from a more focused degree).

Starting university at 19, 20 or 21 isn’t a disadvantage.
'I would say often a gap year and getting some experience in work or volunteering is a better choice than a flexible degree if someone is genuinely split between courses.'
But if the person still wants to get into university straight from sixth form, which is totally understandable, a flexible degree could be the option. You can study other subjects for Scottish degree courses, and you can change the focus of the degree for years 1 and 2.
That would be a decent balance, without having to start university later.

'(Although there’s some excellent courses with flexibility built into the course structure - there’s also a lot that try to be jack of all trades and end up with graduates trying to enter competitive industries without the advantage of specialist skills they would have from a more focused degree).'
What about Scottish degrees, especially St Andrews, Glasgow and Edinburgh? For years 1 and 2, changing isn't too difficult, though radical changes are still uncommon, though not that rare.

'Starting university at 19, 20 or 21 isn’t a disadvantage.'
Depending on what someone does in their gap year, it can be a disadvantage, though not necessarily a disadvantage.
And depending on the gap year, the person might lose their academic edge.
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PQ
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#13
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#13
I’d say if you want to go to university straight from sixth for without a gap year then it is still better in most cases to have a clear idea about what you want to study instead of rushing onto a flexible course that might offer a poor student experience or not provide the skills and knowledge and experience required to get into the industry you’re hoping to enter.

Going to university because you can’t think of anything better to do is far from ideal.
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Caz1234567
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#14
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#14
(Original post by PQ)
I would say often a gap year and getting some experience in work or volunteering is a better choice than a flexible degree if someone is genuinely split between courses.

(Although there’s some excellent courses with flexibility built into the course structure - there’s also a lot that try to be jack of all trades and end up with graduates trying to enter competitive industries without the advantage of specialist skills they would have from a more focused degree).

Starting university at 19, 20 or 21 isn’t a disadvantage.
Couldn't agree more. I applied last December and got an offer from my dream uni, on results day this August I didn't get the grades for my first or insurance. I couldn't find my course in clearing so instead of taking up a place on a random course just for the sake of going uni, I decided to take a gap year. Now I have a job at a top corporate company. It's an entry level office job but it's given me some financial independence and some time to think about things. The most shocking thing that I've learnt through applying for jobs is that most entry level jobs require a degree and nearly all my colleagues with the same position and pay as me have degrees. Sadly going to uni has now become an expectation but you've got to remember that this is your own money you're putting into the degree and you'll be studying it for the next 3-4 years of your life, so make sure you're getting your money's worth by picking a degree that you love! Hope this helps
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harrysbar
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Year12Studentt)
I have to disagree with this slightly. I took this advice last year but was thinking of applying to PPE and Politics and Economics at the same uni. I was told to only apply for one (PPE) and was offered a place on the Politics course instead. I asked to change to Politics and Economics but by that time it was too late and all courses were filled, but I was told had I applied for Politics and Economics my application would have been successful. It all depends on the uni tbh.
There is no problem people applying for two courses as similar as PPE and Politics & Economics.

The only problem is when people want to apply to 2 completely different courses due to difficulty in writing a convincing personal statement for both.
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