Women claim they were spiked by injection

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Napp
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#1
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#1
If true, and i have no particular reason to doubt it, this is a horrifying new development. The spiking of drinks with various drugs is an abhorrent practice in the first place committed by the very lowest of vermin. Taking this to the next level and actually injecting someone is eyewatering in its callousness and viciousness.
Aside from giving someone an unknown drug without their consent, hardly the safest of practices in the first place, the fact people are apparently injecting unsuspecting women is unbelievably dangerous. Aside from the fact that injecting drugs amplifies its effects, in a manner of speaking, sticking a sharp object in someone can cause untold harm from diseases to damaging nerves and so on. It truly is depressing that some sub-human would sink to this level, it also confuses me beyond words as i have no idea how theyd intend to carry out their perverse plans? Knocking someone out, aside from being fairly obvious to everyone around, is not exactly helpful, nor subtle.

We can only hope that these are isolated incidents and not the beginning of some new 'fad'.

The fact this demeans all men is something else that really grates to be honest, it may well be a squintingly small number of people who would consider doing this, or actually do it, but it is all men who take the flak for this evil behaviour.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...ttingham-clubs
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caravaggio2
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#2
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#2
Not all men do this but unfortunately every person that does do it is a man, which is why you are right about all men taking the flack for a tiny minority of scum.
Try blaming any other group for the actions of a minority in that group and see how that flies. David Amess's murder comes to mind.
You would think the Guardian would have allowed comments on that report so that any women having also experienced it could have posted in.
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Barbu
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#3
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#3
Truly vile.

I have two younger sisters, and I would hunt down anyone who tried to do this to them.


I read about a case on Twitter yesterday, and the extent this happens in nightclubs across the country is mind-boggling. Club owners are simply not doing enough.
Last edited by Barbu; 1 month ago
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PilgrimOfTruth
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#4
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Despicable behaviour, but also imo highly stupid of anyone to get so paralytic on booze that they can't feel someone sticking a needle into them and are so unaware of their surroundings that they can't tell what is going on.
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IanDangerously
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#5
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(Original post by Napp)
If true, and i have no particular reason to doubt it, this is a horrifying new development. The spiking of drinks with various drugs is an abhorrent practice in the first place committed by the very lowest of vermin. Taking this to the next level and actually injecting someone is eyewatering in its callousness and viciousness.
Aside from giving someone an unknown drug without their consent, hardly the safest of practices in the first place, the fact people are apparently injecting unsuspecting women is unbelievably dangerous. Aside from the fact that injecting drugs amplifies its effects, in a manner of speaking, sticking a sharp object in someone can cause untold harm from diseases to damaging nerves and so on. It truly is depressing that some sub-human would sink to this level, it also confuses me beyond words as i have no idea how theyd intend to carry out their perverse plans? Knocking someone out, aside from being fairly obvious to everyone around, is not exactly helpful, nor subtle.

We can only hope that these are isolated incidents and not the beginning of some new 'fad'.

The fact this demeans all men is something else that really grates to be honest, it may well be a squintingly small number of people who would consider doing this, or actually do it, but it is all men who take the flak for this evil behaviour.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...ttingham-clubs
This whole spiking craze is reaching an all time high and is only going to get worse. I don’t see this being a short term fad unfortunately.

Something like spiking is very difficult to pick up on CCTV in a crowded space so the best possible deterrent is well trained eyes out on the floor knowing what to look for and being vigilant whilst they’re going about their jobs.

Does a spiker really have to worry about getting caught out in the same way as they would 2-3 years ago? Everybody knows there’s a recruitment crisis in the industry and venues are running with far less staff than before.

I don’t really know what the solution is because a lot of the things that these campaign groups are talking about would already be in place if there were enough people willing to actually do it.
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brjf
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#6
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For some reason, spiking seems to be getting bigger and bigger
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ThomH97
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#7
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(Original post by Napp)
If true, and i have no particular reason to doubt it, this is a horrifying new development. The spiking of drinks with various drugs is an abhorrent practice in the first place committed by the very lowest of vermin. Taking this to the next level and actually injecting someone is eyewatering in its callousness and viciousness.
Aside from giving someone an unknown drug without their consent, hardly the safest of practices in the first place, the fact people are apparently injecting unsuspecting women is unbelievably dangerous. Aside from the fact that injecting drugs amplifies its effects, in a manner of speaking, sticking a sharp object in someone can cause untold harm from diseases to damaging nerves and so on. It truly is depressing that some sub-human would sink to this level,
We have quite a few contributory factors, and none can really be addressed easily. There are people who feel entitled to sex (likely due to the media they are consuming, but that's still no excuse for their conscious decisions), there are enough people who will drink so much they pass out that a few more passing out from another drug don't raise any eyebrows (again, the media, peer pressure etc), the lack of surveillance within clubs (it's dark, you want people to feel welcome in your club etc) among others. Sure, you can try frisking everyone who comes in, but a small syringe is easy to hide. And tbh, there are a lot of people who simply won't go to an establishment if they need to subject themselves to a groping to 'prove' they aren't a rapist.

I think the article raises a good point regarding testing. Awareness for potential victims is good, and having a way to quickly get a blood sample is vital in having evidence to prosecute. Waiting at the hospital the next day when most of it's already cleared your system is too late. I don't think absolute prevention is practical, but a decent safety net is, and will serve as a stronger deterrent. "Hi, I woke up at home with a pain in my leg that I think I got last night, but don't remember anything including what club, and if I were injected it's gone from my bloodstream now" isn't going to get many convictions, but "Hi, someone brushed past me just now at the bar and I felt a sharp pain on my leg. Can you take a sample and look at the CCTV?" is much more effective process.

it also confuses me beyond words as i have no idea how theyd intend to carry out their perverse plans? Knocking someone out, aside from being fairly obvious to everyone around, is not exactly helpful, nor subtle.
I imagine the goal is to poison their victim enough that they lose most awareness of their surroundings, and try to struggle home or become very compliant to anyone offering help, but not poison them enough that they pass out in front of witnesses.

The fact this demeans all men is something else that really grates to be honest, it may well be a squintingly small number of people who would consider doing this, or actually do it, but it is all men who take the flak for this evil behaviour.
I reject that completely. And anyone who does blame all men for this is a misandrist.
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Napp
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#8
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(Original post by ThomH97)
We have quite a few contributory factors, and none can really be addressed easily. There are people who feel entitled to sex (likely due to the media they are consuming, but that's still no excuse for their conscious decisions), there are enough people who will drink so much they pass out that a few more passing out from another drug don't raise any eyebrows (again, the media, peer pressure etc), the lack of surveillance within clubs (it's dark, you want people to feel welcome in your club etc) among others. Sure, you can try frisking everyone who comes in, but a small syringe is easy to hide. And tbh, there are a lot of people who simply won't go to an establishment if they need to subject themselves to a groping to 'prove' they aren't a rapist.

I think the article raises a good point regarding testing. Awareness for potential victims is good, and having a way to quickly get a blood sample is vital in having evidence to prosecute. Waiting at the hospital the next day when most of it's already cleared your system is too late. I don't think absolute prevention is practical, but a decent safety net is, and will serve as a stronger deterrent. "Hi, I woke up at home with a pain in my leg that I think I got last night, but don't remember anything including what club, and if I were injected it's gone from my bloodstream now" isn't going to get many convictions, but "Hi, someone brushed past me just now at the bar and I felt a sharp pain on my leg. Can you take a sample and look at the CCTV?" is much more effective process.


I imagine the goal is to poison their victim enough that they lose most awareness of their surroundings, and try to struggle home or become very compliant to anyone offering help, but not poison them enough that they pass out in front of witnesses.


I reject that completely. And anyone who does blame all men for this is a misandrist.
Well put on the first part.
However, on the last comment unfortunately it is still true. One merely needs to look at the response to the unfortunate events surrounding the woman killed by a police officer where plenty of women are of the view that this is a problem with men in general as opposed to that nut job. I certainly don't like the view point but unfortunately its not exactly a rare one to be held
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Napp
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#9
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#9
(Original post by PilgrimOfTruth)
Despicable behaviour, but also imo highly stupid of anyone to get so paralytic on booze that they can't feel someone sticking a needle into them and are so unaware of their surroundings that they can't tell what is going on.
A couple of points here:
1) People are perfectly allowed to get drunk in a club.. and as the article states the women were aware of this. Given how quickly it happens though theres little to be done.
2) Depending on the needle theres every reason to suspect they wont feel it. A 29g is a very small needles and most people wont feel it when getting a jab, let alone if theyre dancing and the like and thus not paying direct attention. It can quite easily be missed and 'not paying attention to your surroundings' isnt really a factor.
Lastly though, whats with the victim blaming here? People should be allowed to go to a club without thew fear of being drugged and then blamed for 'not paying attention...
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ThomH97
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(Original post by Napp)
Well put on the first part.
However, on the last comment unfortunately it is still true. One merely needs to look at the response to the unfortunate events surrounding the woman killed by a police officer where plenty of women are of the view that this is a problem with men in general as opposed to that nut job. I certainly don't like the view point but unfortunately its not exactly a rare one to be held
Perhaps I'm naive, but I would like to think that the stronger opinions that are more publicised are being publicised due to being stronger, rather than due to being more common. That boycotts of nightclubs have had to be actively orchestrated rather than organically happening due to fear suggests that most women believe this is a rare enough occurrence that they need not fear men in general, let alone all men.
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hungrysalamander
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#11
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#11
Disgusting behaviour. I hope the criminals are locked up for life.
Incase it happens to someone on here, get PEP from a hospital ASAP to prevent HIV
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Napp
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#12
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#12
(Original post by ThomH97)
Perhaps I'm naive, but I would like to think that the stronger opinions that are more publicised are being publicised due to being stronger, rather than due to being more common. That boycotts of nightclubs have had to be actively orchestrated rather than organically happening due to fear suggests that most women believe this is a rare enough occurrence that they need not fear men in general, let alone all men.
What opinions are you referring to sorry?
Many might but equally enough hold the view for it to be of a concern. Granted, at least the ones ive met who hold the view, all tend to be hard left 'progressive' sorts but nevertheless. This is still a problem though in that it is universally men who commit such crimes, at least i havent hear of any women of note doing it.
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ThomH97
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(Original post by Napp)
What opinions are you referring to sorry?
Many might but equally enough hold the view for it to be of a concern. Granted, at least the ones ive met who hold the view, all tend to be hard left 'progressive' sorts but nevertheless. This is still a problem though in that it is universally men who commit such crimes, at least i havent hear of any women of note doing it.
That all men are somehow responsible for violence against women - i.e. those who would agree that all men should take flak for the actions of a few. These were given more airtime during Sarah Everard's kidnap, rape and murder, but I imagine we'll have a rise again when journalists have had more time to find people to interview regarding these injections.

The reasoning you give is sound in theory, or where it is an individual having to decide who to trust, but in practice is as sensible as pointing out that all Islamic extremists are Muslim, that minorities (especially black people) are more likely to be convicts, or (to flip things around a bit) all people who commit paternity fraud are women. We do not presume Muslims, black people and women are not to be trusted. The law cannot and should not legislate that way.
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Joinedup
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Sorry if I'm being thick but is there any evidence for any needle spiking taking place?

I saw an interview with a second year student on the news who'd been drinking in a club, felt nausea and was unable to walk properly then woke up unable to remember sections of the previous night out and had a unexplained bruise on her hand.... but that's all also consistent with drinking a lot of alcohol.
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Napp
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#15
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(Original post by ThomH97)
That all men are somehow responsible for violence against women - i.e. those who would agree that all men should take flak for the actions of a few. These were given more airtime during Sarah Everard's kidnap, rape and murder, but I imagine we'll have a rise again when journalists have had more time to find people to interview regarding these injections.

The reasoning you give is sound in theory, or where it is an individual having to decide who to trust, but in practice is as sensible as pointing out that all Islamic extremists are Muslim, that minorities (especially black people) are more likely to be convicts, or (to flip things around a bit) all people who commit paternity fraud are women. We do not presume Muslims, black people and women are not to be trusted. The law cannot and should not legislate that way.
No it shouldnt, and doesnt, well usually anyway, However, i was simply referring to the opinions held by some women (merely look at the videos from any protests to see what theyre saying). I cant say i agree with it, it being a thoroughly moronic thing to judge tens of millions by the actions of a handful but nevertheless.
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Napp
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#16
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#16
(Original post by brjf)
For some reason, spiking seems to be getting bigger and bigger
Having not seen the crime stats i cant make a comment on it but is it actually becoming more prevalent or simply being picked up by the news more?
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miser
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#17
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#17
Spiking someone's drink is a despicable thing to do to someone, but injecting them is even worse. Anyone who does that is an absolute menace. Things like this make me glad I don't live in the UK to be honest.
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Nobody2u
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#18
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Sorry if I'm being thick but is there any evidence for any needle spiking taking place?

I saw an interview with a second year student on the news who'd been drinking in a club, felt nausea and was unable to walk properly then woke up unable to remember sections of the previous night out and had a unexplained bruise on her hand.... but that's all also consistent with drinking a lot of alcohol.
Only hearsay, but my daughter told me about a case of this occurring in a Bristol nightclub frequented mainly by students. The girl was apparently far from drunk and had been dancing in a tight packed group and barely felt the needle. Apparently she's now being treated for a possible HIV infection as well!
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Napp
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Joinedup)
Sorry if I'm being thick but is there any evidence for any needle spiking taking place?

I saw an interview with a second year student on the news who'd been drinking in a club, felt nausea and was unable to walk properly then woke up unable to remember sections of the previous night out and had a unexplained bruise on her hand.... but that's all also consistent with drinking a lot of alcohol.
Claims by victims, so place as much stock in them as you wish. In fairness, a puncture mark is fairly distinctive though and not immediately confusable with a simple bruise from a fall or banging into somethin.
I believe some of the girls have evidence, the puncture mark, going by the story which seems to indicate theres an open police investigation on it.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Sorry if I'm being thick but is there any evidence for any needle spiking taking place?

I saw an interview with a second year student on the news who'd been drinking in a club, felt nausea and was unable to walk properly then woke up unable to remember sections of the previous night out and had a unexplained bruise on her hand.... but that's all also consistent with drinking a lot of alcohol.
I think that is something that needs investigating (there has been an arrest in Nottingham).

However, this isn’t something that could have broken out spontaneously all over the country. There are big differences between this and slipping someone a Mickey Finn.

A new supply chain of drugs and syringes needs to have been put in place. These are skin scratches; no-one is saying “excuse me, can I find a vein” so these are not surplus supplies of syringes to the heroin user market. Likewise whatever the drug is, it is effective without being taken orally or intravenously. Most importantly, where is the dissemination of information that this product exists and is on the market? One would expect to see this coming up in chat forums.

The alleged cases so far look like folk doing it “for a laugh” rather than serious attempts at rape. Random jabbing might render a girl paralytic. It doesn’t ensure the jabber ends up picking her up. The main risk for victims with being slipped a Mickey has always been the “date” or at least the attempted “pick up” because that doesn’t involve the need to separate the victim from her friends. Random jabbing is most likely to result in a senseless girl being taken home by her mates.
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