Help......
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#1
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#1
Hello everyone, I plan on applying to university this year and I feel that I have narrowed down my options to math and/with economics or just straight economics. I want to keep options fairly open and was wondering which would be best in terms of employability. Will any of these degrees shut down paths of the other?

My other question is how is university math's compared to a-level math's and is is really that big of a step up?

Finally, does the university you get the degree from really matter? For example is there that much difference from obtaining a math with economics degree at Aston university then getting an economics degree from LSE
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Help......
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#2
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#2
(Original post by yusuf.khalil031)
Hi i had similar questions so will try to share what ive learnt from asking around ect. Ive applied to 4 econ courses and 1 econ and maths at Bath. ill try to be concise

1. I think it matters more what you get in the degree for example if you graduate w a 1st in either it would be more attractive to employers than a 2:1 in the other. However say you and your mate did one of them and you both got 1st i believe the econ w maths would be more attractive as from what ive seen the actual course seems to be harder and employers will know this. That being said i think thats only one thing employers will look for and another key thing would be any experience you have e.g internships. Work experience like that would make you stand out to a whole year of graduates applying for a the exact same jobs. If you kind of know what industry youd wanna go into e.g finance i dont think itd make that big a difference and the things listed above would be more important and be looked at first however im not sure about other industries tbh.

2. If you took further maths you may have an idea if not id say its a decent bit bigger than the jump from GCSE to A levels however everyone's treated as if they have just done A level maths(dependant on if a requirement is further maths or not) and therefore it should just build on what youve studied. If you enjoy maths it shouldnt be too bad however lecture style teaching is different and this may impact your learning.

3.I 100% believe so for a few reasons

Courses are different and its not like a medicine degree where there's such a high demand for doctors and the degree is so highly honoured and hard to get into that everyone's on a level playing field once you graduate. You will have little experiance in whatever field you go into as a graduate and therefore you will be fighting against others with the same qualification. When it says that you graduated from a top10 uni your gonna stand out to employers.

employers understand that a course from e.g Cambridge is harder than say a course at say swansea uni and will therefore like you more if that makes sense.

There is also a difference it opportunities. Better unis provide better support with finding internships which are important and even jobs after you graduate. This is hard to comprehend so for example i have a mate at Kings doing a compsci degree(although different degree its still applicable). He gets emailed every week about different internships and start-ups he can apply for and they help ensure his application is strong ect so he will have relevant experience and a strong profile when he graduates.

Last point big firms(banks,tech accountacny) specifically target graduates from certain universities which you can research into (usually top10) as they know the uni is harder to get into and a harder actual course so what im trying to say is theres a difference in opportunity.

That being said my econ teacher has a mate who graduated from a slightly worse uni then him(around 2 years ago) but is now working at geneva for Deliotte making close to 100k. This is due to the fact he impressed them whilst doing a year working for them on his 3rd year and they offered him a position when he graduated. So despite not having as much support you can still do amazing just takes more effort and a lot more research kinda like if your in a public school like me and wanna apply to good degree apprenticeships and unis just takes more effort w less support.

Hope this helped lmk if i can answer any questions sorry if some parts are a bit vague. All this is from speaking to teachers graduates and my uncle whose the head of accounting at sheffield uni
Thank you so much for replying! Would you say that as math and economics is seen as more rigorous therefore even doing it at a slightly worse university, it would still be better than doing straight economics at a Russel group university or would the same still apply?

Also may I ask where you applied to for economics?
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yusuf.khalil031
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Help......)
Thank you so much for replying! Would you say that as math and economics is seen as more rigorous therefore even doing it at a slightly worse university, it would still be better than doing straight economics at a Russel group university or would the same still apply?

Also may I ask where you applied to for economics?
Just want to accent that just because a uni isnt russel group doesn't mean its worse sorry i read what i said again and its a little confusing in that regard. What i was trying to say is you need a 1st or a 2:1 and work experience to be attractive/employable and unless you go to an amazing RG top 10 uni it doesnt matter as much as you would think what uni you graduated from but it really matters what u actually get. I was trying to explain that better unis give better opportunities in regards to internships and support ,its less on a plate for u if that makes, sense and im saying this from speaking to a friends i have at kings and cardiff and swansea ect. and u can argue unis like St Andrews, Bath, Loughborough, Aberdeen, Dundee, Heriot-Watt, Strathclyde are much better than cardiff(russel group). So really remember that when applying and look at employability stats first. ANY BSC WITH HONOURS IS class *remember that*

I tried looking for maths/econ stats but didn't find any general statistics however its a hard competitive degree and if its a 'degree with honours' your laughing.
however they are also more competitive so keep that in mind and maybe include a mix of econ and then 2/3 more ambitious econ/maths degrees.
Im sorry for writing this in the dumbest way possible to conclude any Bcs with honours is amazing and if you get a 1st or a 2:1 with some work exp you will 10000% find a job. remember the UK has a pretty high demand for econ graduates. it depends on what you prefer however understand that A level maths and uni maths will be just as different as GCSE maths to a levels so research the course thoroughly. Top 10 unis will provide top10 support however it doesnt mean you cant do anything w a degree from somewhere else its literally allll about experience and you need to proactively get it.
I applied to kings, bristol(hoping for a contextual), bath, Warwick and cambridge(Land economy). however i applied to accountancy school leaver programmes with EY, Deloitte and will apply to KPMG when they open and will 100% take them over uni if im lucky enough to be given an offer. This is because in finance i believe its more about experience and working at a global firm will give me an advantage.
Ask if anything's unclear I'm sorry if this confused you and remember to do your own research to come up with your own conclusions.
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Help......
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#4
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(Original post by yusuf.khalil031)
Just want to accent that just because a uni isnt russel group doesn't mean its worse sorry i read what i said again and its a little confusing in that regard. What i was trying to say is you need a 1st or a 2:1 and work experience to be attractive/employable and unless you go to an amazing RG top 10 uni it doesnt matter as much as you would think what uni you graduated from but it really matters what u actually get. I was trying to explain that better unis give better opportunities in regards to internships and support ,its less on a plate for u if that makes, sense and im saying this from speaking to a friends i have at kings and cardiff and swansea ect. and u can argue unis like St Andrews, Bath, Loughborough, Aberdeen, Dundee, Heriot-Watt, Strathclyde are much better than cardiff(russel group). So really remember that when applying and look at employability stats first. ANY BSC WITH HONOURS IS class *remember that*

I tried looking for maths/econ stats but didn't find any general statistics however its a hard competitive degree and if its a 'degree with honours' your laughing.
however they are also more competitive so keep that in mind and maybe include a mix of econ and then 2/3 more ambitious econ/maths degrees.
Im sorry for writing this in the dumbest way possible to conclude any Bcs with honours is amazing and if you get a 1st or a 2:1 with some work exp you will 10000% find a job. remember the UK has a pretty high demand for econ graduates. it depends on what you prefer however understand that A level maths and uni maths will be just as different as GCSE maths to a levels so research the course thoroughly. Top 10 unis will provide top10 support however it doesnt mean you cant do anything w a degree from somewhere else its literally allll about experience and you need to proactively get it.
I applied to kings, bristol(hoping for a contextual), bath, Warwick and cambridge(Land economy). however i applied to accountancy school leaver programmes with EY, Deloitte and will apply to KPMG when they open and will 100% take them over uni if im lucky enough to be given an offer. This is because in finance i believe its more about experience and working at a global firm will give me an advantage.
Ask if anything's unclear I'm sorry if this confused you and remember to do your own research to come up with your own conclusions.
Ah, thank you so much for clearing everything up! I really appreciate it and best of luck for your studies
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artful_lounger
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Help......)
Hello everyone, I plan on applying to university this year and I feel that I have narrowed down my options to math and/with economics or just straight economics. I want to keep options fairly open and was wondering which would be best in terms of employability. Will any of these degrees shut down paths of the other?

My other question is how is university math's compared to a-level math's and is is really that big of a step up?

Finally, does the university you get the degree from really matter? For example is there that much difference from obtaining a math with economics degree at Aston university then getting an economics degree from LSE
University maths (as in maths degree maths) is VERY different to A-level Maths. Very abstract, mostly proof based, and even the problem solving-y questions are very different to A-level and not just "plug and chug" the equations to get an output. It's almost completely unlike A-level Maths really. You will do plenty of A-level style maths in a single honours economics degree.

The maths degree style maths in a joint honours course is really not going to be relevant for 99% of industry roles because it is necessarily abstract. You are never going to have to prove the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem in industry for example. However if you wanted to continue in academia and get an economics PhD you may well need that kind of background depending on the PhD project.

If you're just interested in working in investment banking you don't need to study economics at all, just do whatever degree strikes your fancy provided it's at a target uni. If you wanna do ASNAC at Cambridge then go into IBanking you certainly could do so without much issue. Outside of IBanking even where you studied makes less difference compared to your work experience. Doing economics specifically would only necessary for economics service (or diplomatic service economics stream) roles in the civil service.
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yusuf.khalil031
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#6
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
University maths (as in maths degree maths) is VERY different to A-level Maths. Very abstract, mostly proof based, and even the problem solving-y questions are very different to A-level and not just "plug and chug" the equations to get an output. It's almost completely unlike A-level Maths really. You will do plenty of A-level style maths in a single honours economics degree.

The maths degree style maths in a joint honours course is really not going to be relevant for 99% of industry roles because it is necessarily abstract. You are never going to have to prove the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem in industry for example. However if you wanted to continue in academia and get an economics PhD you may well need that kind of background depending on the PhD project.

If you're just interested in working in investment banking you don't need to study economics at all, just DJ whatever degree strikes your fancy provided it's at a target uni. If you wanna do ASNAC at Cambridge then go into IBanking you certainly could do so without much issue. Outside of IBanking even where you studied makes less difference compared to your work experience. Doing economics specifically would only necessary for economics service (or diplomatic service economics stream) roles in the civil service.
very well put i didn't know that about the joint honours very helpful
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ajay06
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#7
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(Original post by yusuf.khalil031)
very well put i didn't know that about the joint honours very helpful
Hi, I must advise you to look into maths and/ with econ at Lse, in particular, MA103- I believe a TSR thread has some notes you can look at.
MA 103 - Introduction to abstract math
Artful_lounger is very much right
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yusuf.khalil031
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#8
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(Original post by ajay06)
Hi, I must advise you to look into maths and/ with econ at Lse, in particular, MA103- I believe a TSR thread has some notes you can look at.
MA 103 - Introduction to abstract math
Artful_lounger is very much right
Ah it was just to competitive in my opinion and i already have 2 ambitious unis with Cambridge and Warwick didn't want to go balls deep just in case i got like 3 rejections
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BenRyan99
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Help......)
Hello everyone, I plan on applying to university this year and I feel that I have narrowed down my options to math and/with economics or just straight economics. I want to keep options fairly open and was wondering which would be best in terms of employability. Will any of these degrees shut down paths of the other?

My other question is how is university math's compared to a-level math's and is is really that big of a step up?

Finally, does the university you get the degree from really matter? For example is there that much difference from obtaining a math with economics degree at Aston university then getting an economics degree from LSE
I did Maths & Econ for my undergrad so happy to answer any questions you have.

Personally I feel like you need to figure out the hierarchy of importance when picking universities and courses. Generally speaking it's University > internships/work experiences > course > grades on course (assuming you at least get a 2.1).

If you're applying to any pretty competitive industries like finance, economics, law, consulting, etc, the university you go to will give you the biggest advantage in recruitment. So I'd just do whatever course you're interested in at the best possible uni you can get into whether that be maths & Econ or straight Econ. An Econ degree from LSE would far far superior to a Maths&Econ degree from Aston in terms of career prospects.

In terms of the actual courses, Maths & Econ will basically always be more employable than straight Econ. Plus it doesn't completely shut off STEM and data science routes whereas straight Econ sorta does (although I do know a couple that have gone into DS, but it's much rarer). I also found that neither the maths nor the economics at degree level was very similar to a-level and economics will still be pretty quantitative, especially if you're at a good uni for it.
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ajay06
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#10
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
I did Maths & Econ for my undergrad so happy to answer any questions you have.

Personally I feel like you need to figure out the hierarchy of importance when picking universities and courses. Generally speaking it's University > internships/work experiences > course > grades on course (assuming you at least get a 2.1).

If you're applying to any pretty competitive industries like finance, economics, law, consulting, etc, the university you go to will give you the biggest advantage in recruitment. So I'd just do whatever course you're interested in at the best possible uni you can get into whether that be maths & Econ or straight Econ. An Econ degree from LSE would far far superior to a Maths&Econ degree from Aston in terms of career prospects.

In terms of the actual courses, Maths & Econ will basically always be more employable than straight Econ. Plus it doesn't completely shut off STEM and data science routes whereas straight Econ sorta does (although I do know a couple that have gone into DS, but it's much rarer). I also found that neither the maths nor the economics at degree level was very similar to a-level and economics will still be pretty quantitative, especially if you're at a good uni for it.
Thanks for sharing, I didn't know about the hierachy
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BenRyan99
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#11
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(Original post by ajay06)
Thanks for sharing, I didn't know about the hierachy
The hierarchy I mentioned I feel like is just in terms of its impact on recruitment prospects. Recruitment prospects are just one part of university course and institution selection tho so it's worth baring that in mind.

For example, Warwick probably has better Econ recruitment prospects and course rigor then unis like Durham Econ, but a fair argument could still be made for why one might pick Durham over Warwick. Here other factors like social life, location, etc come into play and they're definitely not insignificant. It just depends on how they value things and their discount rates. But for recruitment prospects, imo the hierarchy of importance I mentioned holds for those wanting to go into competitive industries.
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