remussjhj01
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#1
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#1
Hey! So, I'm currently in my second year studying performance at a conservatoire, but I've been getting more and more interested in medicine and surgery and I've been looking into possibly applying for GEM following either my undergrad or masters.
Friends of friends are neurosurgeons and professional musicians, which is definitely something I'm aspiring to do.
What I'm asking is-what can I do to improve my chances of getting into medicine? Any advice?
And please don't come at me with having a go at my degree. Yes, I am interested in medicine and music isn't close at all, but I love my current degree (as I said, I'd love to be able to do both) and won't be dropping out or risking my grade in this degree in anyway (esp. since I know I need at least a 2:1 for GEM).
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ecolier
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#2
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#2
(Original post by remussjhj01)
Hey! So, I'm currently in my second year studying performance at a conservatoire, but I've been getting more and more interested in medicine and surgery and I've been looking into possibly applying for GEM following either my undergrad or masters.
Friends of friends are neurosurgeons and professional musicians, which is definitely something I'm aspiring to do.
What I'm asking is-what can I do to improve my chances of getting into medicine? Any advice?
And please don't come at me with having a go at my degree. Yes, I am interested in medicine and music isn't close at all, but I love my current degree (as I said, I'd love to be able to do both) and won't be dropping out or risking my grade in this degree in anyway (esp. since I know I need at least a 2:1 for GEM).
Best thing to do is work experience first... to make sure you are interested.

Not every doctor becomes neurosurgeons (in fact the vast majority don't), also did your friend of friend tell you there is a huge national lack of neurosurgical consultant posts? So plenty of neurosurgical CCT holders (i.e. those who successfully did their registrar training) are now out of a job.

The best thing to do is WEx first, and then aim for a top UCAT and / or GAMSAT score. There's nothing much more you can do after that to secure an interview.
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jzdzm
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#3
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#3
I'm a music grad and 3rd year GEM student. Of course it's possible to study medicine and play music, but you likely won't be practising 3 hours a day. To do both professionally is hard - I continue to gig, but it's work that I'd been doing for years before starting, and I am turning down a lot more than I am doing and finding myself doing less over time. Building up a musical performance career as you probably know takes a lot of time and effort for very little financial reward initially - unless you have a reliable stream of well paid gigs before you start, you're unlikely to be able to build it up while studying / in the early years of training. Then if you go part time later on to give you time to do more musically, you are likely to have lost a lot of the contacts and routes in that you would have had straight out of college.

So if you really want to do both, I would recommend establishing a musical career first since you are on that path already. While you're still a very junior musician you could do some part-time work as an HCA for example to get more experience and see if medicine really is for you.
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remussjhj01
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#4
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#4
(Original post by ecolier)
Best thing to do is work experience first... to make sure you are interested.

Not every doctor becomes neurosurgeons (in fact the vast majority don't), also did your friend of friend tell you there is a huge national lack of neurosurgical consultant posts? So plenty of neurosurgical CCT holders (i.e. those who successfully did their registrar training) are now out of a job.

The best thing to do is WEx first, and then aim for a top UCAT and / or GAMSAT score. There's nothing much more you can do after that to secure an interview.
I'm currently applying for volunteering at hospitals local to me and am planning to ask my dad and step mum if their hospitals would be willing to have me shadow some doctors for a few days over the summer (they're both nurses).
I'm well aware that not every doctor becomes a neurosurgeon, I just used that as an example. I'm more interested in plastic surgery, paediatrics and OB/GYN and neonatal medicine at the moment (though of course that may change).
I've noticed a lot of WEx is aimed at or exclusively for students still at college/6th form but I'm continuing to look and am about to start looking at practice UCAT questions, just to get a feel for it.

(Original post by jzdzm)
I'm a music grad and 3rd year GEM student. Of course it's possible to study medicine and play music, but you likely won't be practising 3 hours a day. To do both professionally is hard - I continue to gig, but it's work that I'd been doing for years before starting, and I am turning down a lot more than I am doing and finding myself doing less over time. Building up a musical performance career as you probably know takes a lot of time and effort for very little financial reward initially - unless you have a reliable stream of well paid gigs before you start, you're unlikely to be able to build it up while studying / in the early years of training. Then if you go part time later on to give you time to do more musically, you are likely to have lost a lot of the contacts and routes in that you would have had straight out of college.

So if you really want to do both, I would recommend establishing a musical career first since you are on that path already. While you're still a very junior musician you could do some part-time work as an HCA for example to get more experience and see if medicine really is for you.
That's really reassuring to hear! Do you mind me asking where you got your music degree and where you got med offers from? Fine if you'd rather not answer though.
I know I won't be practising as much and gigging will probably become harder and less frequent, but that's something I'm prepared for. I still have nearly 3 years left of just my BMus to build myself as much of a career as I can.
Is there anywhere you'd recommend looking for HCA work and are there any extra qualifications I'll need?

Thank you both for your help!
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remussjhj01
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#5
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I did just do a mock UCAT, as two of the unis I've been looking at require the UCAT. I got 2863 and band 2. Is this good. If I got this or around this in the actual exam would I stand a good chance?
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ecolier
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#6
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#6
(Original post by remussjhj01)
I did just do a mock UCAT, as two of the unis I've been looking at require the UCAT. I got 2863 and band 2. Is this good. If I got this or around this in the actual exam would I stand a good chance?
For GEM that's just above the average. GEM requires higher UCAT generally.

P.S. no one really stands a "good chance" statistically for GEM (unless you have full marks UCAT, perfect work exp etc) , the best you can hope for is a shot at the interviews.

Even then you'd be up against other mature and experienced grads so we would expect "better more well rounded" answers compared to undergrads.
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