miniminx3310
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#1
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#1
finding this super difficult, especially with damn online lectures
I don't know what to do, I feel like I'm falling so behind, but I don't understand any of the links that the work has to economics

FYI - doing derivatives (limits), optimization etc..
I didn't do maths for a-level so I feel like I have no structure to either how to go about independently learning maths
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livlifestudying
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#2
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#2
Hi, I'm not at uni yet but I do take a-level maths and further maths. You might find it helpful to work through the differentiation section of an a-level textbook to introduce you to derivatives because I can imagine that it could be quite confusing if you're going straight from gcse maths to degree level economics
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econhelp525
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E.g., C(q) is a cost curve, then MC(q)=C'(q) is the derivative of C(q). Calculus, linear algebra, etc. are all integral parts of Economics. Were you unaware of the maths content before? How did your University not require an A-level in maths?

You should go and cover all of Differentiation and Integration from AS and A Level textbooks asap, tbh.
Last edited by econhelp525; 1 month ago
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Laurence00
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#4
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#4
(Original post by miniminx3310)
finding this super difficult, especially with damn online lectures
I don't know what to do, I feel like I'm falling so behind, but I don't understand any of the links that the work has to economics

FYI - doing derivatives (limits), optimization etc..
I didn't do maths for a-level so I feel like I have no structure to either how to go about independently learning maths
I’m in the exact same situation
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econhelp525
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#5
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(Original post by econhelp525)
E.g., C(q) is a cost curve, then MC(q)=C'(q) is the derivative of C(q). Calculus, linear algebra, etc. are all integral parts of Economics. Were you unaware of the maths content before? How did your University not require an A-level in maths?

You should go and cover all of Differentiation and Integration from AS and A Level textbooks asap, tbh.
Actually, the amount of advanced statistics and probability is an issue too. What university do you go to?
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miniminx3310
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#6
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(Original post by econhelp525)
E.g., C(q) is a cost curve, then MC(q)=C'(q) is the derivative of C(q). Calculus, linear algebra, etc. are all integral parts of Economics. Were you unaware of the maths content before? How did your University not require an A-level in maths?

You should go and cover all of Differentiation and Integration from AS and A Level textbooks asap, tbh.
Yes pretty much.

Essentially you have to do an additional module in yr1 to make up for it - but as it was online and I was depressed I did the bare minimum throughout the year and scrapped through in the last exam. (yes probably my fault, however issue was exacerbated by very poor PhD teaching; I believe Im in the same boat as quite a lot of people doing my degree)
But anyhow, whats happened now is we have a really good lecturer for microecon, but he's building on content I did not understand last year.,,

would you say using an a level textbook will be better or degree level one haha
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miniminx3310
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#7
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r

(Original post by Laurence00)
I’m in the exact same situation
pray for us xxx
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miniminx3310
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#8
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(Original post by econhelp525)
Actually, the amount of advanced statistics and probability is an issue too. What university do you go to?

SOAS.
Actually finding Statistics quite fine atm - lecturer is good and he's going through all the basics so might be a slightly different dynamic
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BenRyan99
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#9
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(Original post by miniminx3310)
SOAS.
Actually finding Statistics quite fine atm - lecturer is good and he's going through all the basics so might be a slightly different dynamic
SOAS is known for being quite un-quantitative for its economics degrees, instead relying more on heterodox theory.

Firstly, maths is actually easier with recorded lectures than you having to speedily scribble down the working from their bad handwriting on the board in live lectures. Secondly, I'd recommend using Ian Jacques' book "Mathematics for Economics and Business", it's what a lot of non- A-level maths requiring unis use to get students up to speed on differentiation, integration and matrix algebra.
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Laurence00
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#10
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#10
(Original post by BenRyan99)
SOAS is known for being quite un-quantitative for its economics degrees, instead relying more on heterodox theory.

Firstly, maths is actually easier with recorded lectures than you having to speedily scribble down the working from their bad handwriting on the board in live lectures. Secondly, I'd recommend using Ian Jacques' book "Mathematics for Economics and Business", it's what a lot of non- A-level maths requiring unis use to get students up to speed on differentiation, integration and matrix algebra.
Do you think the book can be used as a substitute instead of lectures / lecture notes? (I’m at bristol and I did a level maths but still find the maths for economics pretty difficult to comprehend)
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BenRyan99
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Laurence00)
Do you think the book can be used as a substitute instead of lectures / lecture notes? (I’m at bristol and I did a level maths but still find the maths for economics pretty difficult to comprehend)
I wouldn't recommend using any textbook as a substitute for lectures and lecture notes. Textbooks should really be treated as strictly complements to lectures/tutorials/seminars etc. Ultimately your exams will be based on what's covered in class so you can't really avoid lectures unless you already know the content. What topics/areas are you finding tricky? I think most people take a while to adjust as uni economics is very different to a-level economics, but the first year maths content is typically quite important so I wouldn't recommend avoiding it or putting it off until later.

My tip would be to persist with lectures but note down the things you don't understand, then go back over them in the library or at home. If you still don't understand the lecture material then this is where you may want to resort to an alternative source like a textbook/YouTube, etc. Personally I found YouTube pretty helpful haha, as well as a book called "Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics" by Alpha Chiang. Normally you can find most textbooks in your uni/department library but if not I recommend you don't buy a new copy, buy one on eBay. Most popular textbooks you can get for just a couple pounds rather than £40-60 on a new copy.
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