tortilaa
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#1
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#1
Hi!
Next year I will continue my study at the UK via a foundation for social sciences. This mainly because my academic background would not be let me directly to bachelor and also I want to learn social sciences modules first since my major in high school was mathematics and natural sciences. However, I would like to study A-levels by myself during my gap year, just in case I want to apply Oxford or Cambridge or LSE. Will those unis consider both my report, A-levels and Foundation? Or is it just a waste of time if I do A-Leves while doing a foundation? ( I know oxbridge discourage international foundation year students) Thank you everyone!
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SarcAndSpark
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#2
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#2
(Original post by tortilaa)
Hi!
Next year I will continue my study at the UK via a foundation for social sciences. This mainly because my academic background would not be let me directly to bachelor and also I want to learn social sciences modules first since my major in high school was mathematics and natural sciences. However, I would like to study A-levels by myself during my gap year, just in case I want to apply Oxford or Cambridge or LSE. Will those unis consider both my report, A-levels and Foundation? Or is it just a waste of time if I do A-Leves while doing a foundation? ( I know oxbridge discourage international foundation year students) Thank you everyone!
Realistically, you won't be able to do well in both A-levels and a foundation year. By doing A-levels, you'd likely be sacrificing the foundation year. And without the help of a tutor, someone who is not familiar with the UK system will probably struggle to achieved the grades for the unis you are talking about.

Also, A-levels are a 2 year course.
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Admit-One
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#3
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Foundation years aren’t universally accepted, so if there is any chance you’ll want to apply outside of the Uni where you complete the FY, you’d be better off focusing on A-Levels.
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tortilaa
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#4
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Realistically, you won't be able to do well in both A-levels and a foundation year. By doing A-levels, you'd likely be sacrificing the foundation year. And without the help of a tutor, someone who is not familiar with the UK system will probably struggle to achieved the grades for the unis you are talking about.

Also, A-levels are a 2 year course.
(Original post by Admit-One)
Foundation years aren’t universally accepted, so if there is any chance you’ll want to apply outside of the Uni where you complete the FY, you’d be better off focusing on A-Levels.
Thank you for the suggestions! However, even though with the consideration that I am currently having a gap year (maybe taking online classes for a-levels) and 1 Year of Foundation that comprises related modules, such as politics and economics, which maybe I could take politics and econ A-levels (so it will kind of within the same topic and would be a great supplement for my A-levels) Is it still a bad choice?
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SarcAndSpark
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#5
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(Original post by tortilaa)
Thank you for the suggestions! However, even though with the consideration that I am currently having a gap year (maybe taking online classes for a-levels) and 1 Year of Foundation that comprises related modules, such as politics and economics, which maybe I could take politics and econ A-levels (so it will kind of within the same topic and would be a great supplement for my A-levels) Is it still a bad choice?
You'd need to take a third A-level for the unis you've mentioned.

Why not just take two years out at home and study A-levels online? Then you can apply to whatever uni you like?
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tortilaa
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#6
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
You'd need to take a third A-level for the unis you've mentioned.

Why not just take two years out at home and study A-levels online? Then you can apply to whatever uni you like?
Probably I will take Maths or English

Also, since King's is my first choice after all and they have their own IFP, I want to pursue via their foundation just to hold my conditional offer to their bachelor. And that is why in my mind taking A-levels while doing a foundation or in my gap year would just be an additional attempt for me, maybe If I am lucky enough to absorb the materials fast xD, I could get good scores. But, if I didn't get my desired marks, then it would be ok.
Tbh, I am scared to take another gap year :<, If I prioritize A-levels haha.
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Admit-One
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#7
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(Original post by tortilaa)
Probably I will take Maths or English

Also, since King's is my first choice after all and they have their own IFP, I want to pursue via their foundation just to hold my conditional offer to their bachelor. And that is why in my mind taking A-levels while doing a foundation or in my gap year would just be an additional attempt for me, maybe If I am lucky enough to absorb the materials fast xD, I could get good scores. But, if I didn't get my desired marks, then it would be ok.
Tbh, I am scared to take another gap year :<, If I prioritize A-levels haha.
If progressing onto a degree at King’s after a FY there is your Plan A, then I would focus on that and not mess around with studying AL’s concurrently. Even if it is for the same subjects, you are taking your focus away for little or no benefit. Another Uni isn’t going to accept 2 AL’s from the most recent sitting, a FY from another Uni and take into account your older AL’s.

You’ve also got the possibility of clashes between your AL exams and FY assessments.

If you smash the FY, you can still apply elsewhere and see what comes of it as a Plan B. But FY’s tend to be quite strict with resits, and you don’t want to be in a position where you can’t progress as it wastes another year and all the funding too.

If you’re not confident of getting the AL grades required for Oxbridge/LSE when devoting your time to them entirely, how on earth could you do so whilst studying two different curriculums at the same time?

My colleague PQ is fond of saying “don’t half-arse two things, whole-arse one thing”
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tortilaa
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Admit-One)
If progressing onto a degree at King’s after a FY there is your Plan A, then I would focus on that and not mess around with studying AL’s concurrently. Even if it is for the same subjects, you are taking your focus away for little or no benefit. Another Uni isn’t going to accept 2 AL’s from the most recent sitting, a FY from another Uni and take into account your older AL’s.

You’ve also got the possibility of clashes between your AL exams and FY assessments.

If you smash the FY, you can still apply elsewhere and see what comes of it as a Plan B. But FY’s tend to be quite strict with resits, and you don’t want to be in a position where you can’t progress as it wastes another year and all the funding too.

If you’re not confident of getting the AL grades required for Oxbridge/LSE when devoting your time to them entirely, how on earth could you do so whilst studying two different curriculums at the same time?

My colleague PQ is fond of saying “don’t half-arse two things, whole-arse one thing”
Yeah that actually opens my eyes. It would not be a wise decision if i split my brain into two different things. Thank you so much tho, I appreciate it!
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