ben_james5
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#1
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#1
So I'm looking to apply for engineering courses at uni but I don't have A Level maths, which is obviously pretty essential. I'm thinking of either doing a foundation year or taking a year out and self teaching myself A-Level maths in this year as I don't really want to spend 9k on a foundation year. Is this realistically achievable? My current A Levels are physics, English and Biology and I got an 8 in GCSE maths.
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AbrahamP
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(Original post by ben_james5)
So I'm looking to apply for engineering courses but I don't have A Level maths, which is obviously pretty essential. I'm thinking of either doing a foundation year or taking a year out and self teaching myself A-Level maths in this year as I don't really want to spend 9k on a foundation year. Is this realistically achievable? My current A Levels are physics, English and Biology
Eh I would assume there are a few topics that are more prioritised than others like calculus, trig and vectors and a lot of mechanical maths. Given you have a physics background I could see it being achievable but you won't be strong nor confident as someone who did it for 2 years. Must be very consistent with it as well like doing like 10 hours a week just to fast track through all the 2 year content. Plus Isnt engineering maths basically physics maths, so I'd say yeah its possible

Talk to unis youre interested in to see if theyd take you on without a foundation first just to make sure
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ben_james5
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(Original post by AbrahamP)
Eh I would assume there are a few topics that are more prioritised than others like calculus, trig and vectors and a lot of mechanical maths. Given you have a physics background I could see it being achievable but you won't be strong nor confident as someone who did it for 2 years. Must be very consistent with it as well like doing like 10 hours a week just to fast track through all the 2 year content. Plus Isnt engineering maths basically physics maths, so I'd say yeah its possible

Talk to unis youre interested in to see if theyd take you on without a foundation first just to make sure
Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately pretty much all universities I want to go to have A Level maths as an absolute must, even if you do A level physics. A Level physics doesn't cover stuff like calculus which I guess is very important.
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Reality Check
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#4
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(Original post by ben_james5)
So I'm looking to apply for engineering courses at uni but I don't have A Level maths, which is obviously pretty essential. I'm thinking of either doing a foundation year or taking a year out and self teaching myself A-Level maths in this year as I don't really want to spend 9k on a foundation year. Is this realistically achievable? My current A Levels are physics, English and Biology and I got an 8 in GCSE maths.
Yes, this is definitely do-able, but you have already missed half a term's work, so you need to get a move on with it. Plenty of people do A level maths in their first VIth form year and FM in their second, so I can't see why you can't do your A level maths alongside your existing A levels privately, so long as you're motivated enough.

Can you afford a private tutor - that would make a huge difference.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by ben_james5)
So I'm looking to apply for engineering courses at uni but I don't have A Level maths, which is obviously pretty essential. I'm thinking of either doing a foundation year or taking a year out and self teaching myself A-Level maths in this year as I don't really want to spend 9k on a foundation year. Is this realistically achievable? My current A Levels are physics, English and Biology and I got an 8 in GCSE maths.
Is this to sit it in 2021 or 2022?
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ben_james5
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Is this to sit it in 2021 or 2022?
2023 I think, my actual A Levels are 2022 (this school year)
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ben_james5
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#7
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Yes, this is definitely do-able, but you have already missed half a term's work, so you need to get a move on with it. Plenty of people do A level maths in their first VIth form year and FM in their second, so I can't see why you can't do your A level maths alongside your existing A levels privately, so long as you're motivated enough.

Can you afford a private tutor - that would make a huge difference.
Thanks for the reply, I'd definitely consider a private tutor if I have the money at the time. I'm thinking about doing it next year though after my A Levels are done, so I haven't lost any time yet.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by ben_james5)
2023 I think, my actual A Levels are 2022 (this school year)
Yes, sorry I meant 22 or 23 - OK then if you start as soon as your current A levels are done then it's perfectly possible.

Try here for lesson PPTs: https://www.drfrostmaths.com/sow.php...2017&term=Main

Probably worth brushing up on GCSE algebra first here: https://www.drfrostmaths.com/sow.php...eets&term=GCSE
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ben_james5
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Yes, sorry I meant 22 or 23 - OK then if you start as soon as your current A levels are done then it's perfectly possible.

Try here for lesson PPTs: https://www.drfrostmaths.com/sow.php...2017&term=Main

Probably worth brushing up on GCSE algebra first here: https://www.drfrostmaths.com/sow.php...eets&term=GCSE
Thanks a lot, those will be really helpful. I'll be sure to check them out!
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Muttley79
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#10
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#10
(Original post by ben_james5)
Thanks a lot, those will be really helpful. I'll be sure to check them out!
Do note the requiremnts re the large data set and the type of calculator you will need.
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