Difference between Law LLB and Law and criminology?

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kzboy7
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Hi, I’m just wondering about the difference between a straight law degree and a law with Criminology degree. Is the straight law degree more respected and make it easier to get a training contract? And does law with criminology mean you don’t end up with a law degree? Is either looked upon with more preference?
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by kzboy7)
Hi, I’m just wondering about the difference between a straight law degree and a law with Criminology degree. Is the straight law degree more respected and make it easier to get a training contract? And does law with criminology mean you don’t end up with a law degree? Is either looked upon with more preference?
Hey kzboy7 Is the Law with Criminology degree also an LLB? You'll need an LLB if you want to be a practicing lawyer. Some universities will offer BA courses in Law- which is essentially studying Law without the professional qualification, so you will gain a great understanding of Law and Criminology and then carry out a Graduate LLB degree if you want to pursue becoming a lawyer.

If you have an interest in becoming a practicing lawyer then I'd recommend looking for LLB routes as that's the most appropriate qualification. You'll still have elements of Criminology throughout I would imagine but you'll be able to check that in your module lists. If you're not certain you'd like to be a lawyer then you can consider the Law with Criminology route and bear in mind you can do a Graduate LLB degree (so it would take you longer to qualify). Becoming a lawyer is overall quite a long process so I'd recommend knowing whether or not that's definitely what you'd like to do.

Our Law department have recently created this guide on How to become a lawyer which I've found really useful! You can find it here: https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/und...becomealawyer/. It is for the Scottish law system so if you're elsewhere it's worth double checking some of the steps.

Good luck with it!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
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kzboy7
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde)
Hey kzboy7 Is the Law with Criminology degree also an LLB? You'll need an LLB if you want to be a practicing lawyer. Some universities will offer BA courses in Law- which is essentially studying Law without the professional qualification, so you will gain a great understanding of Law and Criminology and then carry out a Graduate LLB degree if you want to pursue becoming a lawyer.

If you have an interest in becoming a practicing lawyer then I'd recommend looking for LLB routes as that's the most appropriate qualification. You'll still have elements of Criminology throughout I would imagine but you'll be able to check that in your module lists. If you're not certain you'd like to be a lawyer then you can consider the Law with Criminology route and bear in mind you can do a Graduate LLB degree (so it would take you longer to qualify). Becoming a lawyer is overall quite a long process so I'd recommend knowing whether or not that's definitely what you'd like to do.

Our Law department have recently created this guide on How to become a lawyer which I've found really useful! You can find it here: https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/und...becomealawyer/. It is for the Scottish law system so if you're elsewhere it's worth double checking some of the steps.

Good luck with it!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
Hi, the course is a law with criminology LLB; does this mean following it I will have the same qualification if you know what I mean? I know you mention a BA but I’m not sure if this clears anything up
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04MR17
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(Original post by kzboy7)
Hi, the course is a law with criminology LLB; does this mean following it I will have the same qualification if you know what I mean? I know you mention a BA but I’m not sure if this clears anything up
Just so you know, some of the information that Strathclyde have provided isn't quite correct. For one thing there is no such thing as a "Graduate LLB degree" (misleading title that actually should say "Graduate Entry LLB Law (Bachelor's)") and to become a lawyer (at least in England) you don't need to have a law undergraduate degree at all.

I have asked for someone with far more expertise than me to advise you too, hopefully they will post in here shortly.
Last edited by 04MR17; 4 weeks ago
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Just so you know, some of the information that Strathclyde have provided is incorrect. For one thing there is no such thing as a "Graduate LLB degree", and to become a lawyer (at least in England) you don't need to have a law undergraduate degree at all.

I have asked for someone with more expertise to advise you, hopefully they will post in here shortly. I'm sorry that you've had some incorrect info today.
Oops sorry about that! To the best of my knowledge my info is accurate but I did say above that the info I was linking was for Scottish unis so apologies if it isn't right in this instance. Happy to delete if my info isn't accurate. There is however a Graduate LLB degree so that's correct (in Scotland at least so not sure if this is again where there's any confusion- we teach this).

Sorry for any misunderstandings!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
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04MR17
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde)
Oops sorry about that! To the best of my knowledge my info is accurate but I did say above that the info I was linking was for Scottish unis so apologies if it isn't right in this instance. Happy to delete if my info isn't accurate. There is however a Graduate LLB degree so that's correct (in Scotland at least so not sure if this is again where there's any confusion- we teach this).

Sorry for any misunderstandings!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
Strathclyde offer a Graduate Entry LLB Bachelor's degree. It's pretty much the exact same course content as the normal LLB according to the website.

However, the article you linked does not say that you need the Graduate entry LLB Law to become a lawyer if you don't have an undergraduate LLB. Which is the main incorrect bit of your earlier post.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Just so you know, some of the information that Strathclyde have provided is incorrect. For one thing there is no such thing as a "Graduate LLB degree", and to become a lawyer (at least in England) you don't need to have a law undergraduate degree at all.
There is such a thing as a graduate LLB degree (also known as senior status LLB), such as this one at Queen Marys in London. However, the quickest route for someone with a non Law degree would be a conversion course such as this one at BPP. But as long as your course has an LLB attached to it kzboy7 it is effectively a Law degree anyway, regardless of whether it is combined with Criminology. I wouldn't say that "with Criminology" would make it less respected exactly but you may find yourself being questioned at interviews for training contracts why you wanted to specialise in Criminology if that is not the area of law you are applying for. So I think a straight Law LLB is slightly preferable in that way but only slightly.

https://www.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate...senior-status/

https://www.bpp.com/courses/law/post...version-course
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Joleee
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(Original post by kzboy7)
Hi, the course is a law with criminology LLB; does this mean following it I will have the same qualification if you know what I mean? I know you mention a BA but I’m not sure if this clears anything up
Law with Criminology is not offered at Scottish universities so i won't bother going on a shpeil about it up north or the route to practising up there. i'm assuming you were looking at courses in England or Wales?

Law with Criminology LLB in England and Wales is a qualifying law degree (which is usually stated on the university's website; have you looked into this? ) which means it's the equivalent of a straight LLB. likewise you'll know if a degree is a BA because it will state on the university's website that it's a BA (in which case not a qualifying law degree).

this means if you choose Law with Criminology LLB and you wish to become a solicitor it's the same journey to qualifying as if you would've done a straight LLB.

(also fyi law is not a vocational degree - that's why they make you do vocational study after you've graduated your bachelor's whether you want to practise in England or Scotland. ps you don't necessarily need a training contract so long as you have qualifying work experience with the new SQE exams.)
https://www.law.ac.uk/study/postgrad...8aAkF8EALw_wcB

to answer your original questions: no, one degree is not necessarily more respected than the other just cuz of its name. i reckon there's a misconception that there's some prestige just from holding a law degree (which everyone and there dog seems to have in the UK) which i suspect you may have fallen into(?). when you decide what to study you need to consider the best uni you can get into and what degree you think you will excell at cuz employers do not care about the name of your degree so much as they look at the grade you achieved, which uni you went to, what your work experience is like, how well written your application is along with all the applicants they have received; it's an overall equation they work out in their heads which you also need to do for yourself.

when you work out this equation bear in mind many good school do not offer Law with Criminology (Bristol, Durham and KCL for example) so it may or may not be limiting your prospects in some regard should you choose this route (although i suppose obvs your options will primarily be limited first by your grades).
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Joleee
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(Original post by harrysbar)
There is such a thing as a graduate LLB degree (also known as senior status LLB), such as this one at Queen Marys in London. However, the quickest route for someone with a non Law degree would be a conversion course such as this one at BPP. But as long as your course has an LLB attached to it kzboy7 it is effectively a Law degree anyway, regardless of whether it is combined with Criminology. I wouldn't say that "with Criminology" would make it less respected exactly but you may find yourself being questioned at interviews for training contracts why you wanted to specialise in Criminology if that is not the area of law you are applying for. So I think a straight Law LLB is slightly preferable in that way but only slightly.

https://www.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate...senior-status/

https://www.bpp.com/courses/law/post...version-course
to call it a 'graduate LLB' tho is incorrect and misleading as it's not a graduate degree. a graduate degree is a Master's degree; like there's no such thing as a 'graduate LLB' and obvs that would be an oxymoron :nah: this is just fast-tracking a 3-year bachelor's for those who already hold a bachelor's (i know you know what it is obvs; but the key word we've missed a few times it seems is 'entry' ).
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Catherine1973
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Yes I did a graduate llb which is still just a degree but in 2 years and only for graduates -though sone places do it in 2 years but no graduate requirements.

Mostly done by overseas students to avoid 4 year USA cost courses.

I did it as I was interested in studying law as a subject not as I wanted to be a lawyer (and it was cheaper to do in 2 years rather than 3)
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Joleee)
to call it a 'graduate LLB' tho is incorrect and misleading as it's not a graduate degree. a graduate degree is a Master's degree; like there's no such thing as a 'graduate LLB' and obvs that would be an oxymoron :nah: this is just fast-tracking a 3-year bachelor's for those who already hold a bachelor's (i know you know what it is obvs; but the key word we've missed a few times it seems is 'entry' ).
I don’t agree - it is a graduate llb as it is a law degree course aimed at graduates condensed into 2 years instead of 3 as Catherine says.
A masters is a postgraduate degree, in the U.K. at least
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Catherine1973
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It’s weird that a law /gdl masters is considered much higher level than an llb undergraduate as it covers the same stuff (degree covers more as you get optional modules) and you do a dissertation (but you can do one at llb level).
Is it harder to make it level 7 over level 6?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
It’s weird that a law /gdl masters is considered much higher level than an llb undergraduate as it covers the same stuff (degree covers more as you get optional modules) and you do a dissertation (but you can do one at llb level).
Is it harder to make it level 7 over level 6?
It covers the same stuff but in only one year so I guess that is very hard in terms of time management and having to revise for all the exams at once, though I agree that the content probably isn't actually harder especially for people who don't do the masters bit.
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Joleee
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I don’t agree - it is a graduate llb as it is a law degree course aimed at graduates condensed into 2 years instead of 3 as Catherine says.
A masters is a postgraduate degree, in the U.K. at least
yeah i know what the two year course is which i have already stated above, but you're both calling it by the wrong name by eliminating the word 'entry'. a 'graduate LLB' does not exist. google 'what is a graduate degree'; you won't find a bachelor's.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Joleee)
yeah i know what the two year course is which i have already stated above, but you're both calling it by the wrong name by eliminating the word 'entry'. a 'graduate LLB' does not exist. google 'what is a graduate degree'; you won't find a bachelor's.
Some people do refer to it as a Graduate LLB - the Allaboutlaw website for example, or some unis like Exeter or Edinburgh, who say of their graduate entry LLB course:
"The Graduate LLB is a two-year programme intended for those who already hold a degree-level qualification and wish to obtain an undergraduate qualification in law.
The Graduate LLB is designed primarily to prepare you for entry to the Scottish legal profession.
What's in a name? It's not worth arguing about as graduate LLB or graduate entry LLB or senior status LLB all refer to the same course. I don't see any name as "wrong" as there are several variations that all refer to the same course.

https://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/law-courses/graduate-llb

https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/underg...view&code=M115

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduat...s/law/gradllb/
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Joleee
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Some people do refer to it as a Graduate LLB - the website I have linked for example, or some unis like Exeter. What's in a name? It's not worth arguing about as graduate LLB or graduate entry LLB or senior status LLB all refer to the same course. I don't see any name as "wrong" as there are several variations. My point is that the graduate (or graduate entry if you prefer) or senior status LLB does exist as an option for people with alternative degrees to consider, though it's not the quickest route.

https://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/law-courses/graduate-llb

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduat...s/law/gradllb/
i see, but University of Exeter doesn't call it a 'graduate LLB'. yes the composition of words makes a difference because it conveys different meanings as to whether something is a graduate degree or a bachelor's, but i shall digress because off-topic comments are rule breaking, sorry Harrys. pretty sure OP doesn't care :nah:
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Joleee)
i see, but University of Exeter doesn't call it a 'graduate LLB'. yes the composition of words makes a difference because it conveys different meanings as to whether something is a graduate degree or a bachelor's, but i shall digress because off-topic comments are rule breaking, sorry Harrys. pretty sure OP doesn't care :nah:
They call it LLB Graduate which is the same as Graduate LLB and Edinburgh do refer to it directly as "The Graduate LLB..." as you will see from my edit.

I'm happy to drop this as agree that OP won't care but you started our conversation when you said "to call it a 'graduate LLB' tho is incorrect and misleading"...that is obviously a matter of opinion so we can agree to differ.
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University of East Anglia UG Student Rep: Leah
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(Original post by kzboy7)
Hi, I’m just wondering about the difference between a straight law degree and a law with Criminology degree. Is the straight law degree more respected and make it easier to get a training contract? And does law with criminology mean you don’t end up with a law degree? Is either looked upon with more preference?
Hi there,

Great question, let me see what I can offer to help you.

Generally, a straight Law LLB will be the most flexible option out of all Law LLB options. You will most likely be offered the most optional modules on the Law LLB, and this can be an important consideration when looking at your uni choices as they all will offer slightly different, narrower or broader ranges of optional modules. For example, here at UEA the law school has a really diverse range of optional modules, covering topics such as medical law, animal welfare law, media law and jurisprudence. In addition to the specific law modules, there is also the option in your final year to choose a module from a different school of study, such as from the school of history, journalism, politics or languages. To find out more about our Law LLB course and our optional modules, please look here.

Some universities offer Law LLBs with a specialist area, such as criminology, business, European and American law. These degrees will likely feature all of the same modules as the straight Law LLB alongside an increased overall number of compulsory modules so as to meet the specialist areas requirements. At UEA, all of our Law LLBs are qualifying law degrees, meaning that you can go straight into post-graduate training to become a lawyer after leaving university. This is an important thing to consider as not all specialist Law degrees at all universities are qualifying law degrees. So, if you are considering a career as a lawyer it may be worth double checking that your uni choices all offer qualifying law degrees.

Generally, the type of Law degree you have will not have huge consequences when it comes to getting training contracts or legal work post-university. The grades you achieve are of far more concern than the type of Law degree or the modules that you choose. It goes without saying that if you are set on a certain area of law then specialising in that area will be beneficial to your own knowledge, but law firms are not really too picky about this kind of thing.

Again, in terms of preference, the one you think you will enjoy and do the best in is probably the best option to go with.

Hope this helps,

Leah
UEA Law
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