lane_in_pain
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
How do T-cells stimulate phagocytes to engulf pathogens by phagocytosis?
Also, what kind of T-cell does this?
Is it T-Helper cells, and they do it by secreting antibodies?
Thank you for your help, this topic is interesting but a bit difficult.
0
reply
Haluro
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
phagocytes become antigen-presenting cells which stimulate t cells. T cells then divide into 4 different types of cells the T helper cells are the ones that stimulate the B cells which then divide by mitosis to form memory cells and plasma cells. The plasma cells are the ones that secrete their antibodies to bind onto the antigen of the pathogens. The memory cells are the ones that stay in the blood for secondary infection, so response is quicker.
1
reply
Jpw1097
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 6 months ago
#3
(Original post by lane_in_pain)
How do T-cells stimulate phagocytes to engulf pathogens by phagocytosis?
Also, what kind of T-cell does this?
Is it T-Helper cells, and they do it by secreting antibodies?
Thank you for your help, this topic is interesting but a bit difficult.
The immune system has two arms: the innate (or non-specific) and the adaptive (or specific) immune system. The non-specific/innate immune system includes phagocytes (such as neutrophils, macrophages) which engulf and phagocytose pathogens. The innate immune system responds the same every time it encounters a pathogen - it does not "learn" from past exposures.

The adaptive/specific immune system contains lymphocytes (B and T cells). B cells (or more precisely, plasma cells) secrete antibodies. There are lots of different types of T cells, broadly categorised into T-helper cells and killer or cytotoxic T cells. Cytotoxic T cells kill cancer cells or infected cells. When lymphocytes encounter a pathogen, they also produce memory B/T cells which "remember" the pathogen, and deal with it a lot quicker upon re-exposure with the same pathogen.
0
reply
lane_in_pain
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by Jpw1097)
The immune system has two arms: the innate (or non-specific) and the adaptive (or specific) immune system. The non-specific/innate immune system includes phagocytes (such as neutrophils, macrophages) which engulf and phagocytose pathogens. The innate immune system responds the same every time it encounters a pathogen - it does not "learn" from past exposures.

The adaptive/specific immune system contains lymphocytes (B and T cells). B cells (or more precisely, plasma cells) secrete antibodies. There are lots of different types of T cells, broadly categorised into T-helper cells and killer or cytotoxic T cells. Cytotoxic T cells kill cancer cells or infected cells. When lymphocytes encounter a pathogen, they also produce memory B/T cells which "remember" the pathogen, and deal with it a lot quicker upon re-exposure with the same pathogen.
Thank you!!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you done work experience at school/college?

Yes (156)
41.82%
Not yet, but I will soon (69)
18.5%
No (148)
39.68%

Watched Threads

View All