For those here who grew up in strict religious households, what was/is life like?

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RJDG14
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#1
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#1
While Britain has significantly fewer highly religious people than countries such as the US, I know it still has a few evangelical Christians and other strict religious groups, which probably comprise between (at an estimate) 2 and 5% of the population. As somebody from a secular/non-practicing mainline protestant background, I'm wondering if anyone here who was raised in a strict religious household can explain what life was like for you when growing up? I'm asking this from a purely neutral perspective.

I know that some of the strictest evangelical Christian parents in the UK have sent their children to A.C.E. (Accelerated Christian Education) schools, banned them from reading books such as the Harry Potter series due to the fact that they contain the concept of magic, and also forbidden them to listen to secular music artists. I'd imagine that the majority of religious parents are less strict than this, but I have little first hand knowledge other than a few brief discussions with a couple of religious students when I was at secondary school a few years ago. One of them was homeschooled for a couple of years but I don't know if their faith had anything to do with this or not.
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The Real Me
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#2
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#2
mine is quite strict im not allowed to wear shirts, im not allowed my hair out (idrm tbh), im not allowed out i think there is more but im tired and i cant think rn
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gjd800
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Basically stopped once I got to secondary level. Everyone had an opinion but my Ma n Da weren't arsed. Still went through religious school till 18 but it was a box-ticker.

Irish Catholic, for reference.
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jaesix
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#4
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#4
didnt grow up in a british household but strict(?) and religious, yes.

• i still find it difficult to ask for something from my parents, as if i just feel like anything i ask will be turned down.
• i also have not hung out with friends (like even in a park/town etc) without adult supervision before
• (edited cus i forgot my third point lol) constant pro-life, homophobic, transphobic, pretty-much-anything-thats-not-a-conservative-view-phobic things being shamelessly said every time something related comes up, difficult for me cus i don’t agree with what they say anymore but i dont want to be the only one fighting against them. + im bisexual so it just hurts to hear what they say sometimes, knowing that i can’t ever tell them how and why i feel upset towards what they say.
Last edited by niallsearwax; 6 months ago
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RJDG14
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#5
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(Original post by gjd800)
Basically stopped once I got to secondary level. Everyone had an opinion but my Ma n Da weren't arsed. Still went through religious school till 18 but it was a box-ticker.

Irish Catholic, for reference.
I suspect your experience was fairly typical for Ireland, at least until fairly recently. Ireland was a highly religious country until approximately the 1990s, when Catholic adherence declined a lot and I think church attendance in the Republic of Ireland is today only around 1/4 to 1/3 (I think). I believe most of Ireland's Catholic schools are state funded and run through a partnership between the Irish government and Catholic Church, while Ireland's National Schools are secular schools run directly by the government (I've been to Ireland many times before so know quite a lot about the country). The A.C.E. schools are independent and typically charge an admission fee, though there are only a few dozen of them in the UK. The European division of the American organisation that runs them appears to be based just a few miles from where I live.
Last edited by RJDG14; 6 months ago
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RJDG14
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#6
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#6
(Original post by niallsearwax)
didnt grow up in a british household but strict(?) and religious, yes.

• i still find it difficult to ask for something from my parents, as if i just feel like anything i ask will be turned down.
• i also have not hung out with friends (like even in a park/town etc) without adult supervision before
May I ask which country you originally grew up in? I'm guessing it was either the US, Ireland or potentially somewhere in Europe.
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Smeraldettoi
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#7
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#7
(Original post by RJDG14)
While Britain has significantly fewer highly religious people than countries such as the US, I know it still has a few evangelical Christians and other strict religious groups, which probably comprise between (at an estimate) 2 and 5% of the population. As somebody from a secular/non-practicing mainline protestant background, I'm wondering if anyone here who was raised in a strict religious household can explain what life was like for you when growing up? I'm asking this from a purely neutral perspective.

I know that some of the strictest evangelical Christian parents in the UK have sent their children to A.C.E. (Accelerated Christian Education) schools, banned them from reading books such as the Harry Potter series due to the fact that they contain the concept of magic, and also forbidden them to listen to secular music artists. I'd imagine that the majority of religious parents are less strict than this, but I have little first hand knowledge other than a few brief discussions with a couple of religious students when I was at secondary school a few years ago. One of them was homeschooled for a couple of years but I don't know if their faith had anything to do with this or not.
Boring. Hard to come out as queer
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RJDG14
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#8
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(Original post by Smeraldettoi)
Boring. Hard to come out as queer
Coming out as LGBT to parents would have probably been hard for many British individuals living in secular households 30 years ago, but attitudes have improved a lot among secular and mainstream Christian individuals in recent decades so most non/less religious parents today are generally accepting (in about 1990 attitudes were quite mixed - many would have been accepting but unhappy initially).

I respect people for whatever their religious views are, but one of the most upsetting LGBT-related articles I read was about somebody who was "excommunicated" by their Jehovah's Witness adhering family for coming out as gay. It was quite sad that his family put the mandates of their faith over the wellbeing of their son, especially since I believe the doctrine a lot of strict Christians follow emphasises the importance of family.
Last edited by RJDG14; 6 months ago
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Smeraldettoi
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#9
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#9
(Original post by RJDG14)
Coming out as LGBT to parents would have probably been hard for many British individuals in secular households 30 years ago, but attitudes have improved a lot among secular individuals in recent decades so most non/less religious parents today are generally accepting (in about 1990 attitudes were quite mixed).

I respect people for whatever their religious views are, but one of the most upsetting LGBT-related articles I read was about somebody who was "excommunicated" by their Jehovah's Witness adhering family for coming out as gay. It was quite sad that his family put the mandates of their faith over the wellbeing of their son.
The JW’s are quite strict on that. My mum was a USA style evangelical type so I was a tad bit worried about coming out to her. She didn’t really accept it or take it very well at first, even after I became a born again Christian myself, but we’ve kind of worked through some queer theology together and I’d like to think we’ve both become a bit more open minded and accepting
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RJDG14
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Smeraldettoi)
The JW’s are quite strict on that. My mum was a USA style evangelical type so I was a tad bit worried about coming out to her. She didn’t really accept it or take it very well at first, even after I became a born again Christian myself, but we’ve kind of worked through some queer theology together and I’d like to think we’ve both become a bit more open minded and accepting
Were your parents strict on the kind of media you could consume as a kid (books, TV, music etc) and if so, what kind of things did she/they prohibited you from accessing?
Last edited by RJDG14; 6 months ago
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Smeraldettoi
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#11
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#11
(Original post by RJDG14)
Were your parents strict on the kind of media you could consume as a kid (books, TV, music etc) and if so, what kind of things did she/they prohibited you from accessing?
Surprisingly no, just like the adult/ sex stuff I couldn’t watch, but my mum was cool letting me watch horror movies, listen to what I wanted, read Harry Potter and the Magyk series, etc
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jaesix
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#12
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#12
(Original post by RJDG14)
May I ask which country you originally grew up in? I'm guessing it was either the US, Ireland or potentially somewhere in Europe.
grew up in the uk, but my family is asian
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username5706823
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#13
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#13
I grow up in a strict religious household where abuse is excused because of religion, it has a horrible negative impact on me and I'll most likely cut my family off later in my life
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Ciel.
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#14
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#14
i wouldn't call mine super-strict but i was raised in a catholic family
i rebelled pretty early, in my early teens i was already into satanism. i'm also gay......
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