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A - Level English Literature OCR / Revision Help

Hi All! I was wondering if I could get some advice regarding on how to effectively revise for my English Lit A-Level exams. I am currently in Yr 13 and my grades haven't been the best so any advice given would be greatly appreciated :smile:

The pieces we study are the following:
Drama and poetry section: The Duchess of Malfi compared with Rossetti's poetry as well as Hamlet for the 15 markers
The gothic section: Comparison between Frankenstein and The Bloody Chamber.

With regards to coursework, we study A Streetcar Named Desire and can choose from any poets to compare alongside to it.
Ok, I sadly did none of those texts, so the only advice I can offer you is: LEARN THOSE QUOTES!
Seriously. Having lots of quotes in your essays-especially imbedded ones, (let me know if you don't know what those are)-are really important to your essays and teachers and examiners alike love it.
Another thing too-it helps if you read what other people have written about the texts. That way, you can magpie their ideas, and, if you've got a good memory, you could even try mentioning their name and quote them in your essays.
Don't be worried if you're a word or two out with the quote-you get some leeway with that. Plus, you'll only get better at learning them and using them the more you do it.

You could always ask your teacher for a list of good quotes? Or find websites online that have a list? Or even go through the texts yourself and pick the ones you think are best?
Original post by nehapartha
hi there,

also doing lit but the only thing we're studying in common is Frankenstein so I don't know if I can help that much. but my advicr would be to definitely keep a quote bank for the novels (its better if jot down the quotes while reading) and make a list of common and different themes, narrative techniques, contextual factors, literary devices etc for the comparison.

our teacher also makes us do plenty of in-class essays that after doing so many the content just gets in your head and you'll automatically be writing some of the paragraphs.

Hi! thank you! where would be the best place to find contextual information for any texts?
Original post by squirrelmonkey12
Ok, I sadly did none of those texts, so the only advice I can offer you is: LEARN THOSE QUOTES!
Seriously. Having lots of quotes in your essays-especially imbedded ones, (let me know if you don't know what those are)-are really important to your essays and teachers and examiners alike love it.
Another thing too-it helps if you read what other people have written about the texts. That way, you can magpie their ideas, and, if you've got a good memory, you could even try mentioning their name and quote them in your essays.
Don't be worried if you're a word or two out with the quote-you get some leeway with that. Plus, you'll only get better at learning them and using them the more you do it.

You could always ask your teacher for a list of good quotes? Or find websites online that have a list? Or even go through the texts yourself and pick the ones you think are best?

Hi there! So it's basically including a wider range of AO5 within my writing then? Do you have any website recommendations as to where I could find a bank of quotes?
Original post by alevelenglish
Hi there! So it's basically including a wider range of AO5 within my writing then? Do you have any website recommendations as to where I could find a bank of quotes?

Yes, but also it's good to approach characters and themes in different ways, and read what critics have written to get a better idea :-)

Critics you can find on Jstor or the English and Media Centre (if your school/college has a subscription) or even just articles on the internet.

With book quotes, try shmoop? Or spark notes? They tend to have lists of character and thematic quotes!
Reply 5
Original post by alevelenglish
Hi All! I was wondering if I could get some advice regarding on how to effectively revise for my English Lit A-Level exams. I am currently in Yr 13 and my grades haven't been the best so any advice given would be greatly appreciated :smile:
The pieces we study are the following:
Drama and poetry section: The Duchess of Malfi compared with Rossetti's poetry as well as Hamlet for the 15 markers
The gothic section: Comparison between Frankenstein and The Bloody Chamber.
With regards to coursework, we study A Streetcar Named Desire and can choose from any poets to compare alongside to it.

hi i do those exact texts to a T rn for my eng lit a level and my exams in a few weeks, are there any notes you still have that youd be willing to share? or some tips id rlly appreicate it

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