If you were in charge of the education system in the UK what would you do?

Watch
username4933106
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
As title, If you were in charge of the education system what would you change/keep the same etc.
0
reply
username4933106
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#2
I would want to focus on also teaching more practical life skills. I would also want to alter the system in schools regarding stress and pressure. Obviously the system is a lot more complicated but yeh
7
reply
SaucissonSecCy
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 3 weeks ago
#3
Ban private schools, reintroduce selective grammar schools. Very very simple fair and effective way to raise standards and not discriminate by class in this country.
Last edited by SaucissonSecCy; 3 weeks ago
4
reply
username4933106
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
Ban private schools, reintroduce selective grammar schools. Very very simple fair and effective way to raise standards and not discriminate by class in this country.
Ahh that’s interesting 🤔
0
reply
hotpud
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
Ban private schools, reintroduce selective grammar schools. Very very simple fair and effective way to raise standards and not discriminate by class in this country.
Hmmm - are you sure this would do that? There are two state grammar schools in Altringham, Cheshire. Would you be surprised to discover that the average house price in the catchment of these schools is around £800k+. It is well known that in areas that still have grammar schools, wealthy and middle class parents will do almost anything to ensure their kids get in. Meanwhile, everyone else has to do to the failure's school.

I would change the education system by making it a bit less accountable. The levels of scrutiny in schools are just unbearable. Schools are judged on outcomes, Ofsted and local education authorities and that filters right down to the lowliest teacher. The amount of work on top of just teaching kids teachers are expected to do is ridiculous. If teachers could focus just on teaching, the job would be a breeze and outcomes would improve overnight because teachers wouldn't be knackered all the time.
5
reply
Napp
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 3 weeks ago
#6
Ditch non-subjects (or stop funding them) like film studies, various 'critical' theories' and redirect any funding from them to more useful topics .. or as earlier mentioned skills thatre actually useful in life such as money management (the number of people on this forum with cifas markers being a case in point).

On a more specific level though, id like to see the history curriculum completely overhauled. The current one being ridiculous in not teaching anything of relevence to British history (the history of medicine hardly being the most pertinent bit of our history when the empire is utterly ignored) along with some vaguely more interesting things, ditch the unification of germany/italy and the Spanish civil war and focus more on, as noted, our own history (which happily touches many other countries from Malaya to India and Australasia) as well as other countries stand alone history there being plenty of examples fo fascinating events around the world thatre simply ignored for tedious junk.

I imagine maths can be redone as well to make it more engaging. There was an interesting story about a teacher who used weed to help teach students (as in using its weights and sales) which actually engaged the students and showed higher levels of students doing well, as opposed to 'akhmed has 5 apples' or such boring stuff like that. Its less a matter of maths being inherently boring (although it kind of is) but it isnt helped by the reaslly *****y way its taught that doesnt speak to kids at all.
9
reply
SaucissonSecCy
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by hotpud)
Hmmm - are you sure this would do that? There are two state grammar schools in Altringham, Cheshire. Would you be surprised to discover that the average house price in the catchment of these schools is around £800k+. It is well known that in areas that still have grammar schools, wealthy and middle class parents will do almost anything to ensure their kids get in. Meanwhile, everyone else has to do to the failure's school.

I would change the education system by making it a bit less accountable. The levels of scrutiny in schools are just unbearable. Schools are judged on outcomes, Ofsted and local education authorities and that filters right down to the lowliest teacher. The amount of work on top of just teaching kids teachers are expected to do is ridiculous. If teachers could focus just on teaching, the job would be a breeze and outcomes would improve overnight because teachers wouldn't be knackered all the time.
It couldnt be worse than it is. You'd have a far greater volume of grammar schools across mixed areas.
0
reply
Crazed cat lady
Badges: 8
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 3 weeks ago
#8
Stop the insane grade inflation/prizes for all culture that the Conservatives love.

We should award top grades for top students, not hand them out like Smarties.
11
reply
Gaddafi
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report 3 weeks ago
#9
1) First create a general life foundation GCSE. This has only numeracy, reading and writing tasks in it.
2) Drop school leaving age to 14 for everyone who can pass this.
3) Set up manual labour and trade based jobs for those who choose to leave.
2
reply
SHallowvale
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 3 weeks ago
#10
Make citizenship and critial thinking core subjects alongside english, maths and science.
3
reply
SHallowvale
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report 3 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Napp)
On a more specific level though, id like to see the history curriculum completely overhauled. The current one being ridiculous in not teaching anything of relevence to British history (the history of medicine hardly being the most pertinent bit of our history when the empire is utterly ignored) along with some vaguely more interesting things, ditch the unification of germany/italy and the Spanish civil war and focus more on, as noted, our own history (which happily touches many other countries from Malaya to India and Australasia) as well as other countries stand alone history there being plenty of examples fo fascinating events around the world thatre simply ignored for tedious junk.
Oh God, yes. I remember spending so much time in history learning about the medieval and tudor periods, both of which are extremely dry and irrelevant compared to our modern history.
0
reply
L i b
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 3 weeks ago
#12
While I'm all for academic rigour, I do think getting out of the classroom and seeing more practical application of subjects would be a positive thing all round. Show young people what careers are available, give them better guidance and let them appreciate what their education can offer in practical terms.

I genuinely believe for lots of people a passion for learning comes later in life. Young people need more inspiration than that. Unsurprising when there's so much excitement of new things and new experiences.
2
reply
hotpud
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 3 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
It couldnt be worse than it is. You'd have a far greater volume of grammar schools across mixed areas.
Indeed. And across all areas they would be serving the middle classes of that area very nicely. What you need to understand is that when you provide something over and above the normal, people will do anything to ensure they get in. If that means private tutoring and the like then so be it.

Meanwhile, those who should go to grammar school but don't have the resources behind them get left behind. So you have grammar schools full of middle class kids many of whom got in because they gamed the entrance exam but don't have the ability whilst those with the ability but without the means to pass the test get left behind.

If there is one proven way to discriminate against those who should achieve but don't quite, it is the grammar school system. It is well documented and happening as I type.

A comprehensive system is by no means perfect, but it does at the very least offer the same opportunities to everyone if they are prepared to work for it.
Last edited by hotpud; 3 weeks ago
0
reply
SaucissonSecCy
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report 3 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by hotpud)
A comprehensive system is by no means perfect, but it does at the very least offer the same opportunities to everyone if they are prepared to work for it.
It offers just as much area selection and lagging behind the private schools massively in terms of opportunities.
0
reply
SaucissonSecCy
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#15
Report 3 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by SHallowvale)
Oh God, yes. I remember spending so much time in history learning about the medieval and tudor periods, both of which are extremely dry and irrelevant compared to our modern history.
All I recall learning in history was the Nazis and JFK. It was well taught.
Last edited by SaucissonSecCy; 3 weeks ago
0
reply
hotpud
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
It offers just as much area selection and lagging behind the private schools massively in terms of opportunities.
Of course. But it isn't the school that sees the opportunities come forth. It is the parents. Is it really a surprise that the sort of people who can afford the best schools see their kids get the best jobs? The school is kind of irrelevant. If you put the richest kids in the worst schools, they would still achieve more than the working class kid at the same school

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcas...s/id1524080195
0
reply
Napp
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#17
Report 3 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by SHallowvale)
Oh God, yes. I remember spending so much time in history learning about the medieval and tudor periods, both of which are extremely dry and irrelevant compared to our modern history.
We spent abput 1 term in primary school on them, nothing more. Hardly teaching us about it.
0
reply
SHallowvale
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#18
Report 3 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Napp)
We spent abput 1 term in primary school on them, nothing more. Hardly teaching us about it.
Huh, really? Strange, we spent several years in primary and secondary learning about them.
0
reply
Saracen's Fez
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#19
Report 2 weeks ago
#19
I've moved this to Educational debate where (for a variety of reasons ) you might find this gets more interest.
0
reply
WhoAmI???
Badges: 8
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#20
Report 2 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by Gaddafi)
1) First create a general life foundation GCSE. This has only numeracy, reading and writing tasks in it.
2) Drop school leaving age to 14 for everyone who can pass this.
3) Set up manual labour and trade based jobs for those who choose to leave.
2) is controversial. they'd be stiII developing at 14 obvs and staying in schooI is better should they decide they want to take education more seriousIy (assuming the ones who'd want to Ieave aren't). schooI Iife shouId be a thing.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you give consent for uni's to contact your parent/trusted person in a mental health crisis?

Yes - my parent/carer (37)
31.36%
Yes - a trusted person (28)
23.73%
No (34)
28.81%
I'm not sure (19)
16.1%

Watched Threads

View All