dipole dipole

Watch this thread
cytoplasm420
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
will someone please explain to me dipole dipole bonding and polarity for dummies, like as if u were explaining to an alien... i am confusion.
0
reply
IJaguar
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 6 months ago
#2
If I remember correctly,

So basically... One atom is able to attract the electrons in a covalent bond better than the other atom in the bond can. Since it can attract the electrons better, it has a greater share of the electrons. Electrons are negative, so this makes the atom's end of the covalent bond slightly negative. Since the other atom has a lesser share of the electrons, it is less negative and so it is slightly positive. Negative things and positive things attract, and so the slightly negative end (dipole) of one molecule is attracted to the slightly positive end (dipole) of another molecule, which is what dipole dipole attraction is
2
reply
cytoplasm420
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#3
(Original post by IJaguar)
If I remember correctly,
oh
So basically... One atom is able to attract the electrons in a covalent bond better than the other atom in the bond can. Since it can attract the electrons better, it has a greater share of the electrons. Electrons are negative, so this makes the atom's end of the covalent bond slightly negative. Since the other atom has a lesser share of the electrons, it is less negative and so it is slightly positive. Negative things and positive things attract, and so the slightly negative end (dipole) of one molecule is attracted to the slightly positive end (dipole) of another molecule, which is what dipole dipole attraction is
this is such a good explanation thank you! wishing u were my chem teacher
0
reply
cytoplasm420
Badges: 12
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by cytoplasm420)
this is such a good explanation thank you! wishing u were my chem teacher
just another q- i hope this isnt too much to ask.. for questions asking which types of bonds are present, how do you approach? i know vdw is present in all, but can some molecules only have van der waals?
0
reply
Kallisto
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 6 months ago
#5
(Original post by cytoplasm420)
will someone please explain to me dipole dipole bonding and polarity for dummies, like as if u were explaining to an alien... i am confusion.
Okay, here is an explanation for dummies: a dipole means that there is a positive and a negative charge. As they are different, they have a polarity. This polarity forms the bonding.

A dipole dipole bonding means that there are alternating charges to form a bonding: positive-negative-positive-negative-... etc.

Example: a water molecule has both a positive (hydrogen) and two negative charges (oxygen). Many water molecules are connected by alternating charges, so hydrogen and oxygen atoms. These connections are the hydrogen bridge bonding.
0
reply
booklover1313
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 6 months ago
#6
(Original post by cytoplasm420)
just another q- i hope this isnt too much to ask.. for questions asking which types of bonds are present, how do you approach? i know vdw is present in all, but can some molecules only have van der waals?
You will have a polar bond when the difference in electronegativities is high enough. If you look at the values on the Pauling scale, a difference from around 0.1-1.8 will give you a polar covalent bond. If in the molecule, they are symmetrical (so balance out), there will be no overall dipole, as neither end is more negative or positive. If the polar covalent bonds are uneven in the molecule, then you will probably end up with a dipole-dipole.
You get hydrogen bonding when the H is bonded to a very electronegative element, like F, O or N
0
reply
scimus63
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
try here:
https://www.science-revision.co.uk/A...le_forces.html

there are other pages on Vdw bonding as well
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Y13's - If you haven't confirmed your firm and insurance choices yet, why is that?

I am waiting until the deadline in case anything in my life changes (24)
18.75%
I am waiting until the deadline in case something else changes (e.g. exams/pandemic related concerns) (14)
10.94%
I am waiting until I can see the unis in person (9)
7.03%
I still have more questions before I make my decision (22)
17.19%
No reason, just haven't entered it yet (33)
25.78%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (26)
20.31%

Watched Threads

View All