user021
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#1
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#1
Hi all!
I’ve started picking up leading my lessons, most of them have gone well.
However, with my year 10 class I can feel nerves starting to show particularly with the didactic parts of the lesson.
Does anyone have any advice to stop nerves looking so visible?
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tinyperson
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#2
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#2
smile
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bluebeetle
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#3
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#3
(Original post by user021)
Hi all!
I’ve started picking up leading my lessons, most of them have gone well.
However, with my year 10 class I can feel nerves starting to show particularly with the didactic parts of the lesson.
Does anyone have any advice to stop nerves looking so visible?
I think you will naturally develop a more confident teacher presence as you gain more experience, but it can take time. Is there anything particular you are nervous about? If you can identify exactly what it is, you can plan your lesson with that in mind (e.g. if you are nervous about disruptive behaviour, try to make sure there is always a task on the board that students can be doing if you have to pause to send out a particularly disruptive student).
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SarcAndSpark
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#4
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#4
(Original post by user021)
Hi all!
I’ve started picking up leading my lessons, most of them have gone well.
However, with my year 10 class I can feel nerves starting to show particularly with the didactic parts of the lesson.
Does anyone have any advice to stop nerves looking so visible?
I'm glad your lessons are going well.

I think it's normal to feel nervous, and it's okay. Is there anything specifically making you nervous?

Confidence will come with time, but I think a lot of it is "fake it til you make it"- know what you are going to say, script notes if needed, project your voice, and speak slowly. Stand confidently- feet shoulder width apart, shoulders back, open body language, try not to hide behind the desk.

If you trip over a word, or something, it's fine- I do think all the time, make a little joke about it, and move on. It's really good to model making mistakes and overcoming the mistake!
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user021
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#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by bluebeetle)
I think you will naturally develop a more confident teacher presence as you gain more experience, but it can take time. Is there anything particular you are nervous about? If you can identify exactly what it is, you can plan your lesson with that in mind (e.g. if you are nervous about disruptive behaviour, try to make sure there is always a task on the board that students can be doing if you have to pause to send out a particularly disruptive student).
I think for me, as I’m doing history I’m teaching a lot of the content as I’m learning it and I need to be confident with presenting the knowledge. But thank you so much for your advice . In my head I just keep worrying about one of the teachers saying, “look I don’t think this for you.” If my lesson doesn’t go brilliantly
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anosmianAcrimony
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#6
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#6
I had this problem too! I solved it by deciding not to be a teacher and quitting my PGCE.
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charco
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#7
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#7
Don't believe that any teachers are perfect.

Nobody can be expected to know 100% of the material.

It is alright to say, "I don't know", if challenged with a particularly awkward question. You can always say that you will find out the answer, or challenge the class to find out the answer - it could lead to a healthy discussion.

Looking confident is part of the game. I used to liken teaching to acting when I started out. You can become a different person in front of the class and give a show - whatever you find most effective. Many teachers start out under-confident and timid, but soon realise that they are there to help people become the best that they can be in the subject.

Relax and enjoy the experience.

Early in my teaching career I was also asked to perform in a local theatre company - a farce called "The Continental Quilt", in which I played a randy dentist. Now THAT was a terrifying experience, trying to remember lines and act in front of an adult audience!
Last edited by charco; 4 weeks ago
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