What careers involve quantum theory, if any?

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Bottle26
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#1
Hi i am still in my final year of GCSE's but wondering weather i should go for an apprenticeship in something or take my A-levels and then go on to a degree.
My problem is that i prefer the theory side of things and less the practical side, but i don't know what courses i should take for that, or what careers that would lead into! I enjoy learning about and debating things like quantum mechanics but i don't know if i can get a career in that area.
Any insight would be helpful. xx
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grey-giraffe
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#2
Report 9 months ago
#2
If you prefer theory over practical, you likely won't enjoy an apprenticeship. It's 80% work-based learning (practical) and 20% off-the-job training with a college/university (theory).

If you're wanting to go into fields involving quantum theory/mechanics, you'll definitely need to go to university and likely need to do a MSc/PhD. In terms of jobs, I'm not too sure myself as I'm not in this field. From a quick search, it looks like there's opportunities in research, engineering with quantum computers, and also in the medical field.

Hope this is of some help
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artful_lounger
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#3
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#3
The only people that "use" quantum mechanics are physicists, which is normally an academic career. There might be a few physicists working outside of unis but on formally academic projects, like at CERN or on some quantum computing project (for example NASA has something in that realm, and a couple big computing companies like IBM have R&D work in that area I think) but the vast majority will be career academics. In all cases though you would minimally need to get a PhD however.

QM isn't something that is really "debated" by physicists though, it's just something done by physicists. The ones that actually talk about the implications of quantum mechanics and so on are philosophers (of physics). Often philosophers of physics do have a background in physics or sometimes maths though (to the undergrad level anyway) before continuing their academic careers in philosophy. Again, this is an academic career route and the normal route (also for physics above) would be undergrad then PhD then postdoc(s), then getting a permanent position (hopefully) as an academic researcher somewhere.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 9 months ago
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Reece121
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#4
Report 8 months ago
#4
I like your spirit, but you need to pursue physics further at A-level and university... All I can say is that it is intensely different to GCSE.
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