What is a level religious studies like?

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_Robyn_
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#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
I'm thinking about taking r.s for a level and just want to know how different is it from GCSE? Like the structure of the questions are the same at GCSE: 1,2,4,5,12 markers. Is it like that at a level? Just anything about this subject would be appreciated
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sqiddy747
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#2
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I don't know too much about A level RS, but here's what I can find:

In general, it is a big step up from GCSE, as all A levels are. It seems like there is a lot more content that is substantially harder, and it to have a lot more philosophy and ethics (that's where it to some extent overlaps with the philosophy A level), so there would be a lot more content like the stuff in GCSE's paper 2. Also like paper 2, there would be a lot of terminology which I'd assume is new. For instance, in GCSE you've likely looked at the cosmological/teleological arguments and possibly utilitarianism and deontology/deontological ethics (basically Kant). In the A level you get introduced to stuff like the ontological argument (another argument for God's existence), teleological ethics, and the concept of 'a priori' arguments (of which the ontological argument is an example). You might also need to be a little more specific in your language, such as differentiating between a statement/claim and a proposition, or between a valid and sound argument (an argument can be valid without being sound, but to be sound it must be valid).

For the structure, I've looked at a few main exam boards, and most seem to be made up of three papers (philosophy of religion, ethics, a religion) apart from AQA. I'd assume the religion would be either Christianity or the one your school did for GCSE. Most have a particular structure (again like GCSE), but the shortest question I've seen is an 8 marker in Edexcel.

With Eduqas, there's three papers/components (true of all specifications). You respond to two 20 markers and two 30 markers in each paper, so they're all essay style questions, and you're given a choice. I'd assume you'd be taught enough content to answer everything sufficiently rather than something like paper 2 in GCSE where you only answer the themes that you've been taught.

Looking at OCR, again there's three papers and a choice in each: you pick a question to not answer and just do the other three. All questions there are 40 marks, and I'm making the same assumption regarding choice as Eduqas.

For AQA (religious studies not philosophy) there seems to be two papers (philosophy of religion and ethics + the religion) made up of 10 and 15 markers (no choice). In the religion part you also get a second part where you choose a 25 marker to answer (same assumption as above).

Regarding the Edexcel, again, there are three papers. I don't know if the question paper has a particular structure, but for the sample paper I looked at, it seems to be questions of at least 8-30 marks.

In the off chance that you're referring to the A level philosophy (there's only AQA to my knowledge), it's 2 papers made up of 2 sections (Epistemology and Moral Philosophy/ Metaphysics of God and Metaphysics of Mind), and in each section you get a 3 marker, two 5 markers, a 12 marker, and a 25 marker. That means 50 per section, 100 per paper, 200 in the whole thing. No choice in terms of questions.
Last edited by sqiddy747; 7 months ago
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_Robyn_
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#3
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#3
(Original post by sqiddy747)
I don't know too much about A level RS since I'm taking philosophy (AQA and yes, it's a different subject on its own and has some overlap with RS), but here's what I can find:

In general, it is a big step up from GCSE, as all A levels are. It seems like there is a lot more content that is substantially harder, and it to have a lot more philosophy and ethics (that's where it to some extent overlaps with the philosophy A level), so there would be a lot more content like the stuff in GCSE's paper 2. Also like paper 2, there would be a lot of terminology which I'd assume is new. For instance, in GCSE you've likely looked at the cosmological/teleological arguments and possibly utilitarianism and deontology/deontological ethics (basically Kant). In the A level you get introduced to stuff like the ontological argument (another argument for God's existence), teleological ethics, and the concept of 'a priori' arguments (of which the ontological argument is an example). You might also need to be a little more specific in your language, such as differentiating between a statement/claim and a proposition, or between a valid and sound argument (an argument can be valid without being sound, but to be sound it must be valid).

For the structure, I've looked at a few main exam boards, and most seem to be made up of three papers (philosophy of religion, ethics, a religion) apart from AQA. I'd assume the religion would be either Christianity or the one your school did for GCSE. Most have a particular structure (again like GCSE), but the shortest question I've seen is an 8 marker in Edexcel.

With Eduqas, there's three papers/components (true of all specifications). You respond to two 20 markers and two 30 markers in each paper, so they're all essay style questions, and you're given a choice. I'd assume you'd be taught enough content to answer everything sufficiently rather than something like paper 2 in GCSE where you only answer the themes that you've been taught.

Looking at OCR, again there's three papers and a choice in each: you pick a question to not answer and just do the other three. All questions there are 40 marks, and I'm making the same assumption regarding choice as Eduqas.

For AQA (religious studies not philosophy) there seems to be two papers (philosophy of religion and ethics + the religion) made up of 10 and 15 markers (no choice). In the religion part you also get a second part where you choose a 25 marker to answer (same assumption as above).

Regarding the Edexcel, again, there are three papers. I don't know if the question paper has a particular structure, but for the sample paper I looked at, it seems to be questions of at least 8-30 marks.

In the off chance that you're referring to the A level philosophy (there's only AQA to my knowledge), it's 2 papers made up of 2 sections (Epistemology and Moral Philosophy/ Metaphysics of God and Metaphysics of Mind), and in each section you get a 3 marker, two 5 markers, a 12 marker, and a 25 marker. That means 50 per section, 100 per paper, 200 in the whole thing. No choice in terms of questions.
Thank you so much!
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sqiddy747
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#4
Report 7 months ago
#4
By the way, for picking A levels in general, maybe try asking around for the exam board and looking for the specification? That way you know more or less what topics are covered etc.
Last edited by sqiddy747; 7 months ago
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