rose.clm
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#1
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#1
I've always just assumed i'd stay on until S6 because I'm quite an academic person but now i'm not sure, maybe it would be better to go to college, or go to uni a year early? has anyone who has stayed on until S6 got any opinions on the matter?
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A Rolling Stone
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#2
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#2
(Original post by rose.clm)
I've always just assumed i'd stay on until S6 because I'm quite an academic person but now i'm not sure, maybe it would be better to go to college, or go to uni a year early? has anyone who has stayed on until S6 got any opinions on the matter?
im a Londoner and despite graduating from a Scottish uni i never once received an intelligible reason why a Scottish student would want to delay going to uni by a year, especially when they take 3 subjects in their first year of uni anyway so there is less pressure to decide what you want to do. the only negative i ever heard was being 17 for some months of freshers year and having to rely on other people to get you drinks
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rose.clm
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#3
(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
im a Londoner and despite graduating from a Scottish uni i never once received an intelligible reason why a Scottish student would want to delay going to uni by a year, especially when they take 3 subjects in their first year of uni anyway so there is less pressure to decide what you want to do. the only negative i ever heard was being 17 for some months of freshers year and having to rely on other people to get you drinks
Yeah, that makes sense. My original thoughts were that I would study hard in fifth year and try to get an unconditional offer and take 6th year as a break before uni but that's probably a waste of time!
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justlearning1469
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#4
(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
im a Londoner and despite graduating from a Scottish uni i never once received an intelligible reason why a Scottish student would want to delay going to uni by a year, especially when they take 3 subjects in their first year of uni anyway so there is less pressure to decide what you want to do. the only negative i ever heard was being 17 for some months of freshers year and having to rely on other people to get you drinks
'never once received an intelligible reason why a Scottish student would want to delay going to uni by a year'
This. Going to university at 16 is totally fine.
Plus that Scottish student would be really bored in S6.
You can read "A Nation Deceived" for further information on acceleration.

'the only negative i ever heard was being 17 for some months of freshers year and having to rely on other people to get you drinks'
If they lowered the alcohol age to 16 for most alcoholic drinks we'd not have that problem.
Germany has an alcohol age of 16 for beer and wine anyway. It can be done!
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StriderHort
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#5
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(Original post by justlearning1469)
If they lowered the alcohol age to 16 for most alcoholic drinks we'd not have that problem.
Germany has an alcohol age of 16 for beer and wine anyway. It can be done!
Nah, We already can't be trusted with booze as a nation, way too loutish and that's all there is to it.
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justlearning1469
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(Original post by rose.clm)
Yeah, that makes sense. My original thoughts were that I would study hard in fifth year and try to get an unconditional offer and take 6th year as a break before uni but that's probably a waste of time!
You can even get into English university after 5th year.

Leeds requires 6 Highers or 1 Advanced Higher and 5 Highers.
University of Birmingham requires only Highers for numerous courses.
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justlearning1469
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#7
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(Original post by StriderHort)
Nah, We already can't be trusted with booze as a nation, way too loutish and that's all there is to it.
If you can marry in Scotland without parental permission, buy your first property, have sex, join a trade union, vote etc. (Scotland), then are you mature enough to drink a beer?

Allowing 16 year olds to drink the softer alcoholic drinks, and buying them, will quell their rebellious urges.
That's why Germany has that law.
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StriderHort
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#8
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#8
(Original post by justlearning1469)
If you can marry in Scotland without parental permission, buy your first property, have sex, join a trade union, vote etc. (Scotland), then are you mature enough to drink a beer?

Allowing 16 year olds to drink the softer alcoholic drinks, and buying them, will quell their rebellious urges.
That's why Germany has that law.
IMO No. Joining a Trade Union has 0% to do with your immature bodies ability to process alcohol, nor the others. It's bordering on a silly comparison.

We're not Germany, We're a nation of problem drinkers. I've spent enough time working in clubs (including those with unders nights) to know how this all turns out, time and time again. Vomit everywhere, ambulances at the doors, parents screaming at bouncers etc...'how could you let ma wee alkie son do this tae himself!

(You want a wee glass of cider or wine with your parents over a meal fine, but you're too young for drinking culture imo. (hint, this is not how you tame rebellious urges) You know many bars are 21+ right? even 25+? They don't want the sort of problems that come with teenyboppers full stop, and I'll trust them to have done the homework.
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justlearning1469
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#9
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#9
(Original post by StriderHort)
IMO No. Joining a Trade Union has 0% to do with your immature bodies ability to process alcohol, nor the others. It's bordering on a silly comparison.

We're not Germany, We're a nation of problem drinkers. I've spent enough time working in clubs (including those with unders nights) to know how this all turns out, time and time again. Vomit everywhere, ambulances at the doors, parents screaming at bouncers etc...'how could you let ma wee alkie son do this tae himself!

(You want a wee glass of cider or wine with your parents over a meal fine, but you're too young for drinking culture imo. (hint, this is not how you tame rebellious urges) You know many bars are 21+ right? even 25+? They don't want the sort of problems that come with teenyboppers full stop, and I'll trust them to have done the homework.
'Joining a Trade Union has 0% to do with your immature bodies ability to process alcohol, nor the others.'
Hey, at least at 16 you're considered mature enough to break away from your parents and settle in your own life. That should be decent for them.

'We're not Germany, We're a nation of problem drinkers.'
What I'm trying to say is that it's not that outrageous to have a drinking age of 16 for beer, wine and cider. And there are valid reasons behind it.
And it's not merely Germany, it's Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Austria and Denmark(alcohol level of <16.5%).

Allowing 16 year olds the experience of drinking alcohol before they can drive (17 in UK) will probably reduce accidents caused by drunk driving, because they don't go crazy over it while they're at the age of driving.

'I've spent enough time working in clubs (including those with unders nights) to know how this all turns out, time and time again. Vomit everywhere, ambulances at the doors, parents screaming at bouncers etc...'how could you let ma wee alkie son do this tae himself!'
It's more to do with human nature of going crazy when freedom is suddenly given to you.
Allowing a more gradual introduction by 16 alcohol age for softer alcohol drinks like in the countries above could alleviate this issue.

But there will always be the teenagers, undettered by restrictions, who drink a good bit of vodka.
If you can't deal with them, might as well allow them to drink it safely.

'(You want a wee glass of cider or wine with your parents over a meal fine, but you're too young for drinking culture imo.'
The reason why various European countries allow the buying of alcohol at 16:
Because it makes for a healthier relation to drinking.
Someone who knows the effect of alcohol is less likely to be arrested for DUI.

'You know many bars are 21+ right? even 25+? They don't want the sort of problems that come with teenyboppers full stop, and I'll trust them to have done the homework.'
True. There are a few troublesome teens. In areas of pretty high crime, the bar owner might have no choice but to do this.

But at least there are various European countries not that far from UK which have a buying alcohol age of 16 for at least some drinks. It isn't 'outrageous' unlike what skeptics say, it actually works pretty well. And gives teens a bit of freedom.
If teens are going to drink anyway, might as well make it a lot safer.
Prohibition doesn't have too much of an effect.
Last edited by justlearning1469; 3 weeks ago
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GabiAbi84
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#10
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#10
(Original post by rose.clm)
I've always just assumed i'd stay on until S6 because I'm quite an academic person but now i'm not sure, maybe it would be better to go to college, or go to uni a year early? has anyone who has stayed on until S6 got any opinions on the matter?
I went to school a year early so, even though I stayed on til 6th year, I was only 17 and 4mknths going into uni. I hated it-the classes and the work were fine, but I felt like a child in a sea of adults.

It really depends on you and how independent you are and how much you like/hate the school environment.
6th year also gives you a chance to do extra curriculars-volunteering, work experience, hobbies etc without taking away from exam prep as you wouldn’t have so much to be doing at school.

It’s a very personal situation-some will do great going “early”, some will fail to thrive. Some will feel like they’re missing out-both ways round.
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rose.clm
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#11
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#11
(Original post by GabiAbi84)
I went to school a year early so, even though I stayed on til 6th year, I was only 17 and 4mknths going into uni. I hated it-the classes and the work were fine, but I felt like a child in a sea of adults.

It really depends on you and how independent you are and how much you like/hate the school environment.
6th year also gives you a chance to do extra curriculars-volunteering, work experience, hobbies etc without taking away from exam prep as you wouldn’t have so much to be doing at school.

It’s a very personal situation-some will do great going “early”, some will fail to thrive. Some will feel like they’re missing out-both ways round.
Thank you. I've thought about it and I think I would rather stay on, give myself some time to prepare before moving into what would feel like adulthood! Once you go to uni, there's no going back to high school. I think it would be nice to be able to concentrate on extra curriculars and spend time with friends before we need to move away. Plus, if i do a couple advanced highers I guess uni work would be less of a jump? Thanks for your input, that's really helpful.
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StriderHort
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#12
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#12
(Original post by justlearning1469)
'Joining a Trade Union has 0% to do with your immature bodies ability to process alcohol, nor the others.'
Hey, at least at 16 you're considered mature enough to break away from your parents and settle in your own life. That should be decent for them.

'We're not Germany, We're a nation of problem drinkers.'
What I'm trying to say is that it's not that outrageous to have a drinking age of 16 for beer, wine and cider. And there are valid reasons behind it.
And it's not merely Germany, it's Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Austria and Denmark(alcohol level of <16.5%).

Allowing 16 year olds the experience of drinking alcohol before they can drive (17 in UK) will probably reduce accidents caused by drunk driving, because they don't go crazy over it while they're at the age of driving.

'I've spent enough time working in clubs (including those with unders nights) to know how this all turns out, time and time again. Vomit everywhere, ambulances at the doors, parents screaming at bouncers etc...'how could you let ma wee alkie son do this tae himself!'
It's more to do with human nature of going crazy when freedom is suddenly given to you.
Allowing a more gradual introduction by 16 alcohol age for softer alcohol drinks like in the countries above could alleviate this issue.

But there will always be the teenagers, undettered by restrictions, who drink a good bit of vodka.
If you can't deal with them, might as well allow them to drink it safely.

'(You want a wee glass of cider or wine with your parents over a meal fine, but you're too young for drinking culture imo.'
The reason why various European countries allow the buying of alcohol at 16:
Because it makes for a healthier relation to drinking.
Someone who knows the effect of alcohol is less likely to be arrested for DUI.

'You know many bars are 21+ right? even 25+? They don't want the sort of problems that come with teenyboppers full stop, and I'll trust them to have done the homework.'
True. There are a few troublesome teens. In areas of pretty high crime, the bar owner might have no choice but to do this.

But at least there are various European countries not that far from UK which have a buying alcohol age of 16 for at least some drinks. It isn't 'outrageous' unlike what skeptics say, it actually works pretty well. And gives teens a bit of freedom.
If teens are going to drink anyway, might as well make it a lot safer.
Prohibition doesn't have too much of an effect.
I'm not really wanting to derail the thread further but briefly in order.

It's about chemical resistance as much as decision making, not a benchmark age of 16 to be compared to 'responsible' things.

I wouldn't say it's outrageous, but I'd still firmly say no. IMO Ciders and Wines are the main problem drinks with youth, they are in Scotland anyway. we are simply not these other cultures you list and you can't just 'decide'? We've tried to adopt many Japanese business practices but their age of consent is 13, should we adopt that too because it 'works for them'? (Of course not, we'd all freak out and start castrating people, probably drunk) We as a nation have a drinking problem and we can't keep deflecting it to European Cafe culture drinking. I say this living in Glasgow, where public drinking is toto banned for everyone, let alone kids.

I can see the point about training people young to avoid excess.... but nearly all the heavy boozers I know started young ... when you say 'Someone who knows the effects of alcohol will be less likely to be arrested DUI'... is there anything to back that up? I very rarely see anyone caught for it who has an excuse not to know better, and just because teens are going to TAKE liberties is not reason to HAND them them imo. And we're not talking about a few bad apples or high crime areas, again, we are a country with an established drinking problem through generations.. many of these venues simply don't LIKE drunk teens, and neither do other customers, if they already didn't welcome 18-20's, what hope has a 16 got?
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justlearning1469
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#13
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#13
(Original post by StriderHort)
I'm not really wanting to derail the thread further but briefly in order.

It's about chemical resistance as much as decision making, not a benchmark age of 16 to be compared to 'responsible' things.

I wouldn't say it's outrageous, but I'd still firmly say no. IMO Ciders and Wines are the main problem drinks with youth, they are in Scotland anyway. we are simply not these other cultures you list and you can't just 'decide'? We've tried to adopt many Japanese business practices but their age of consent is 13, should we adopt that too because it 'works for them'? (Of course not, we'd all freak out and start castrating people, probably drunk) We as a nation have a drinking problem and we can't keep deflecting it to European Cafe culture drinking. I say this living in Glasgow, where public drinking is toto banned for everyone, let alone kids.

I can see the point about training people young to avoid excess.... but nearly all the heavy boozers I know started young ... when you say 'Someone who knows the effects of alcohol will be less likely to be arrested DUI'... is there anything to back that up? I very rarely see anyone caught for it who has an excuse not to know better, and just because teens are going to TAKE liberties is not reason to HAND them them imo. And we're not talking about a few bad apples or high crime areas, again, we are a country with an established drinking problem through generations.. many of these venues simply don't LIKE drunk teens, and neither do other customers, if they already didn't welcome 18-20's, what hope has a 16 got?
'It's about chemical resistance as much as decision making, not a benchmark age of 16 to be compared to 'responsible' things.'
Fair enough.

'I wouldn't say it's outrageous, but I'd still firmly say no.'
At least you don't say it's outrageous, as you can see it does work in front of your eyes. At least for some instances, you can't deny it.

'IMO Ciders and Wines are the main problem drinks with youth, they are in Scotland anyway. we are simply not these other cultures you list and you can't just 'decide'?'
I mean, ciders have high alcohol and low duty. Wines for the high-class teenagers, especially Burgundy wine.

'We've tried to adopt many Japanese business practices but their age of consent is 13, should we adopt that too because it 'works for them'?'
13 is barely acceptable. My minimum would be 14.
But at least teenage behaviours like sex won't be stigmatised as illegal, which will certainly remove barriers for seeking assistance.
So at least it has some ground to stand on.

'We as a nation have a drinking problem and we can't keep deflecting it to European Cafe culture drinking.'
True, though not merely the UK.
Germany isn't too free of alcohol problems. Though at least 18 year olds won't go crazy over alcohol, which is a plus.
Austria does set the bar high for drink size. At least teenagers can drink before they drive, which reduces DUIs.

'I can see the point about training people young to avoid excess.... but nearly all the heavy boozers I know started young'
Training people young does avoid excess. The heavy boozers start young because they're wired to.

'when you say 'Someone who knows the effects of alcohol will be less likely to be arrested DUI'... is there anything to back that up? '
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