Are apprenticeships looked down on?

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guccislipper
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#1
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#1
I am trying to keep my options as open as possible and I am looking at apply for law apprenticeships. Is this a good route to choose or will my employers think that I am underqualified despite getting the actual qualifications?
Also what is a catch with law apprenticeships like it seems a little too good to be true that you study and also get paid (not a lot but still money is money) and get no debt
Last edited by guccislipper; 7 months ago
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Ash1234
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#2
(Original post by guccislipper)
I am trying to keep my options as open as possible and I am looking at apply for law apprenticeships. Is this a good route to choose or will my employers think that I am underqualified despite getting the actual qualifications?
Also what is a catch with law apprenticeships like it seems a little too good to be true that you study and also get paid (not a lot but still money is money) and get no debt
No it's not looked down on. If it's something advertised by the govt then employers need to accept it and I'm sure the govt currently are promoting apprenticeships vs going University for vocational courses anyways not medicine etc.

Law apprenticeship there's no catch, it's simple as it is- is it 6 years or something you qualify as a solicitor through a different route than doing a degree/University route? Go down that route there's people who have been doing it for years. I'm sure I've seen city centre law firms advertised apprenticeships too. It just seems to be more advertised on social media these days than anything. As an apprenticeship way you gain as much exposure to the law environment. I'm guessing you'll be doing it at a law firm right? So why would they look down at you? As long as it's clearly written in writing this is how long, what qualifications you'll gain and if you'll become a solicitor or a paralegal just be careful.

Just be careful to try an avoid those back street law firms and get into a good one I'm just mindful you don't want to end up being in an unsupportive apprenticeship employer. See what their ex apprentices have gone on to do etc
Last edited by Ash1234; 7 months ago
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Chris2892
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Ash1234)
No it's not looked down on. If it's something advertised by the govt then employers need to accept it and I'm sure the govt currently are promoting apprenticeships vs going University for vocational courses anyways not medicine etc.

Law apprenticeship there's no catch, it's simple as it is- is it 6 years or something you qualify as a solicitor through a different route than doing a degree/University route? Go down that route there's people who have been doing it for years. I'm sure I've seen city centre law firms advertised apprenticeships too. It just seems to be more advertised on social media these days than anything. As an apprenticeship way you gain as much exposure to the law environment. I'm guessing you'll be doing it at a law firm right? So why would they look down at you? As long as it's clearly written in writing this is how long, what qualifications you'll gain and if you'll become a solicitor or a paralegal just be careful.

Just be careful to try an avoid those back street law firms and get into a good one I'm just mindful you don't want to end up being in an unsupportive apprenticeship employer. See what their ex apprentices have gone on to do etc
Ash is spot on, you want to aim for a good employer. They’re much more likely to invest in your development and have the budget to go above and beyond.

You typically finish as skilled as the people who train you. So working with experienced colleagues will give you an advantage.

My career path was quite unique, where I dropped out of school at 16 and did the apprenticeship route from level 2 to level 6 (Bachelors Degree).
I did engineering, not law, but I think I can offer some insight.

L2-L3
You start not knowing anything and definitely feel like an idiot compared to colleagues. It’s important to put that aside and focus on considering everyone as a mentor. I felt that there was plans for me in the long term and that my employer was invested in me.

L4-L6
Often felt in over my head. The expectations and level of work increased significantly. It was more stressful and having an understanding and considerate employer was paramount.

Post-apprenticeship
I finished my apprenticeship as a crucial team member and a subject matter expert in areas the business lacked. They’d ultimately crafted me over the years to fill the skill gaps the team had. I’m now often approached for guidance and help due to the time I’ve spent working at the company.

In summary
It feels too good to be true, almost like you’ve cheated your way into post-grad employment through a family member, but likely only if you land a top employer.
However, it’s both an emotional, psychological, and physical challenge to develop into the employers vision of what they want you to become. It takes a lot of hard work. I think if I didn’t enjoy the work so much, I’d of dropped out due to stress.

A little on the long side, but hope this was insightful.
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guccislipper
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#4
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#4
(Original post by Chris2892)
Ash is spot on, you want to aim for a good employer. They’re much more likely to invest in your development and have the budget to go above and beyond.

You typically finish as skilled as the people who train you. So working with experienced colleagues will give you an advantage.

My career path was quite unique, where I dropped out of school at 16 and did the apprenticeship route from level 2 to level 6 (Bachelors Degree).
I did engineering, not law, but I think I can offer some insight.

L2-L3
You start not knowing anything and definitely feel like an idiot compared to colleagues. It’s important to put that aside and focus on considering everyone as a mentor. I felt that there was plans for me in the long term and that my employer was invested in me.

L4-L6
Often felt in over my head. The expectations and level of work increased significantly. It was more stressful and having an understanding and considerate employer was paramount.

Post-apprenticeship
I finished my apprenticeship as a crucial team member and a subject matter expert in areas the business lacked. They’d ultimately crafted me over the years to fill the skill gaps the team had. I’m now often approached for guidance and help due to the time I’ve spent working at the company.

In summary
It feels too good to be true, almost like you’ve cheated your way into post-grad employment through a family member, but likely only if you land a top employer.
However, it’s both an emotional, psychological, and physical challenge to develop into the employers vision of what they want you to become. It takes a lot of hard work. I think if I didn’t enjoy the work so much, I’d of dropped out due to stress.

A little on the long side, but hope this was insightful.
Thank you that was really helpful. I have one more question but do you feel tied to your company? Like if you wanted to change from one company to another could you do that or are you viewed as just educated for that one company (if that makes sense)
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Ash1234
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#5
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#5
(Original post by guccislipper)
Thank you that was really helpful. I have one more question but do you feel tied to your company? Like if you wanted to change from one company to another could you do that or are you viewed as just educated for that one company (if that makes sense)
When it comes to Law apprenticeships, if it's not just to become a paralegal and it's to become a solicitor I suspect it will take more than the usual apprenticeship timescale so you'll need to find out what do you actually become once you've completed the apprenticeship. So to answer your question "Yes" you will need to be tied to the one company so choose a good one (apply for a few ofcourse) and one that is off commutable distance too. The reason to stay as as what the Chris in the above post has said, some companies will pay or fund your further education after the apprenticeship so it's worth staying unless the company you leave for can guarantee they will support you too.

Once you've finished your apprenticeship you can happily untie yourself and move onto other workplaces.

Your not viewed educated for the one company as the Apprenticeship qualification will be recognized especially I suspect the Law qualifications you'll be receiving. It should be the same for any apprentice in another company.

If you only work for a company that specialises in property law then ofcourse your only have the experience for dealing or managing the property case law so that's something to be mindful about however I suspect you'll have the transferable experience just not the knowledge say to go and work for a company that's specialises in family law.
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Chris2892
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#6
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#6
(Original post by guccislipper)
Thank you that was really helpful. I have one more question but do you feel tied to your company? Like if you wanted to change from one company to another could you do that or are you viewed as just educated for that one company (if that makes sense)
Different companies use different software packages and procedures, but they’re typically all governed by the same national standards, EU rulings, or laws. So changing employers is never that much of a dramatic change.

Soft skills like communication and other interpersonal skills are very transferable. These skills are equally, if not more, valued than software and procedure experience.

These skills are probably best developed on the job where you’re employer may even send you on training. Soft skills aren’t really specifically discussed or taught directly at university.

I’m with the same employer, but wouldn’t have no problems getting interviews. People sometimes change jobs internal within the company too.
Last edited by Chris2892; 7 months ago
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