Mina.Vale2001
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#1
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#1
Just a bit confused about how/when you’re taught the content of a PGCE during a school-direct course. Like do you only do that at Uni (but you only go once every 2 weeks?). Or do you get taught somewhere in the school you’ve been placed in.
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Mina.Vale2001
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I’m unsure whether to go for the uni-direct route or the school direct route. Any insights into what the school direct route is like would be great!
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Mina.Vale2001
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Just wondering if they actually teach you any of the content of the national curriculum during a PGCE in the sense of do they teach you how to teach fractions (for example) or do they broadly teach you how to teach maths and then you’re expected to work out how to teach fractions in the best way.
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Adz2042
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#4
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I would go for the school route, as you learn what life is like as a teacher from the get-go.

Doing the uni route means you learn all the theory, but when it's complete, you're then told 'right, off you go to the school and teach', where some students panic and don't quite like being in that scenario.
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Mina.Vale2001
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#5
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Thank you! Did you do the school direct route? How did you find it- (if you did)
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bluebeetle
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Mina.Vale2001)
I’m unsure whether to go for the uni-direct route or the school direct route. Any insights into what the school direct route is like would be great!
I did a SCITT route, which is basically the same as school direct as you're in schools from day one.

Pros:
- It's good for people that already have a fair bit of experience and are confident with the idea of jumping in and interacting with students right away
- The essays / lectures / theory stuff is spread out more so if you don't like that stuff, it can be easier to get through
- You get to see what the start of the school year looks like, which can be handy when you become a qualified teacher and need to figure out how to start the year on the right foot with your classes
- It can be easier to form a bond with the teachers at the school where you are placed, because you will be there at least a few days every week, whereas on a uni route you won't meet any of the staff at your placement school until several weeks into the school year.

Cons:
- Some people may find it daunting if they have less experience in schools
- You don't often get a full, uninterrupted week in school because you do still have uni stuff to go to spread through the year, so it can mean you have a lot of classes that you only teach for some of their lessons
- If there aren't other trainees in your placement school, it can be harder to make friends with other trainees, because you don't have those few weeks of uni at the start to get to know people
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bluebeetle
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Mina.Vale2001)
Just a bit confused about how/when you’re taught the content of a PGCE during a school-direct course. Like do you only do that at Uni (but you only go once every 2 weeks?). Or do you get taught somewhere in the school you’ve been placed in.
Usually you will have at least one day a week where you go into university and have sessions there, plus you will be expected to do essays and that sort of thing outside of uni time.

Some courses organise it to put more upfront, like on my course for the first term, we had 2 days a week of uni stuff (because we were teaching less hours anyway), then in the second term we had 1 days a week, and in the final term basically nothing except the occasional session.
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Muttley79
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#8
(Original post by Mina.Vale2001)
Just a bit confused about how/when you’re taught the content of a PGCE during a school-direct course. Like do you only do that at Uni (but you only go once every 2 weeks?). Or do you get taught somewhere in the school you’ve been placed in.
Do a proper PGCE course if you can
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Merlin11!
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Mina.Vale2001)
Just wondering if they actually teach you any of the content of the national curriculum during a PGCE in the sense of do they teach you how to teach fractions (for example) or do they broadly teach you how to teach maths and then you’re expected to work out how to teach fractions in the best way.
You have subject specific lessons, English, maths, science where you'll cover some but not all of the curriculum areas and look at best practise teaching approaches for them.
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Muttley79
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Mina.Vale2001)
Just wondering if they actually teach you any of the content of the national curriculum during a PGCE in the sense of do they teach you how to teach fractions (for example) or do they broadly teach you how to teach maths and then you’re expected to work out how to teach fractions in the best way.
They should explore the research into different approaches to teaching fractions and show you some of the physical equipment that can be used to support childrens learning.
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SarcAndSpark
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#11
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#11
Hi

I've merged your threads as they are all asking very similar questions.

I would say School Direct/SCITT routes can be very good if everything goes well. You get more time in school and so build more classroom skills. You may get less support with the PGCE assignments etc, but I think that trade off is worthwhile.

However, I think the downside of Schools Direct in particular (but sometimes also SCITT to an extent) is that if things go wrong on placement, there is limited support for you. If you do a uni based PGCE, it's relatively easy for the uni to step in and discuss things with your school (and in extreme situations, move your placement- and sometimes this does need to happen). However, on a Schools Direct course, this is far less likely to happen, and you can end up stuck in a really difficult situation.

Nobody likes thinking about their course going wrong, and often it is things beyond your control, but I would recommend a PGCE for this reason alone.
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