Describe phagocytic role of macrophages in the non-specific immune response

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zarahh09
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#1
I put this but have a feeling I have done this question completely wrong

My answer: Receptors on macrophage bind to pathogens. Then pathogens get mixed into macrophage membranes whereby lysosome fuses with vacuole and releases digestive enzymes to break down pathogen
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HarisMalik98
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#2
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#2
You're on the right track, but some of the terminology is a bit off.

(Receptors recognise the pathogens)
Correct. If more detail is required, you could mention that it is toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) which recognise specific pathogen-associated traits (known as PAMPs - Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns e.g. LPS, peptidoglycan, LTA, flagellin, dsRNA).

In addition, complement receptors also bind to complement factors that are bound to invading pathogens (e.g. C3b), and, Fc Receptors can bind to Fc regions on antibodies that have neutralised a pathogen (This process of 'tagging' a pathogen for degradation is known as opsonisation). Both of these binding events can also trigger the phagocytosis process. However, this may be too much detail.

(Then pathogens get mixed into macrophage membranes whereby lysosome fuses with vacuole)
Reword this. The pathogen gets "engulfed" or internalised into a membrane-bound vesicle known as a 'phagosome'. The phagosome then fuses with lysosomes to form mature phagolysosomes.

(releases digestive enzymes to break down pathogen)
Bit more detail. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are brought into contact with the pathogen during the formation of the phagolysosome. These enzymes and ROS subsequently degrade the pathogen
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zarahh09
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#3
(Original post by HarisMalik98)
You're on the right track, but some of the terminology is a bit off.

(Receptors recognise the pathogens)
Correct. If more detail is required, you could mention that it is toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) which recognise specific pathogen-associated traits (known as PAMPs - Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns e.g. LPS, peptidoglycan, LTA, flagellin, dsRNA).

In addition, complement receptors also bind to complement factors that are bound to invading pathogens (e.g. C3b), and, Fc Receptors can bind to Fc regions on antibodies that have neutralised a pathogen (This process of 'tagging' a pathogen for degradation is known as opsonisation). Both of these binding events can also trigger the phagocytosis process. However, this may be too much detail.

(Then pathogens get mixed into macrophage membranes whereby lysosome fuses with vacuole)
Reword this. The pathogen gets "engulfed" or internalised into a membrane-bound vesicle known as a 'phagosome'. The phagosome then fuses with lysosomes to form mature phagolysosomes.

(releases digestive enzymes to break down pathogen)
Bit more detail. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are brought into contact with the pathogen during the formation of the phagolysosome. These enzymes and ROS subsequently degrade the pathogen
We haven't learnt half of these things so its a bit confusing to me
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Jpw1097
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#4
Report 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by zarahh09)
We haven't learnt half of these things so its a bit confusing to me
I agree, that is a bit too complex for your level. I think your answer was good - receptors on macrophages bind to the pathogen, this triggers phagocytosis. The macrophage engulfs the pathogen, the pathogen is then contained within a phagosome (membrane surrounding the pathogen). Lysosomes fuse with the phagosome, releasing enzymes which digest the pathogen.
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HarisMalik98
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#5
Report 6 months ago
#5
Apologies, I have no idea what level you're at. That's why I was saying if extra detail is required.
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