What are the key tips to get a 1st class degree

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Anonymous #1
#1
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I'm a second year politics student and I would like to achieve high grades this year and next year...what are the key tips to get a first class in essays or overall?
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ForestShadow
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm a second year politics student and I would like to achieve high grades this year and next year...what are the key tips to get a first class in essays or overall?
there was a guy in our class that got 1st result on everything, he studied 9-5 every weekday tho even if there was no lectures, just a ton of extra reading and practice, he also pre read lectures that were about to be taught so ahead on topics
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University of Suffolk student
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm a second year politics student and I would like to achieve high grades this year and next year...what are the key tips to get a first class in essays or overall?
Hi Anonymous I'm glad to hear that everything's going great with your course and that you're aiming for high grades! I'd say from personal experience and talking to others, that being able to apply the content and talk about it in discussions and essays will really help you to learn the information and achieve high grades.
I feel like becoming familiar with the assignment brief is also an easy way to pick up marks as you'll know what you need to write about in order to get the high marks. If you're ever unsure of anything, your lecturers are there to help and answer any questions you have about the topic or the assignment brief! Maybe asking the previous years if they have any tips or revision resources that you can borrow might be a good idea too as they've completed the essays before and know what the marking criteria is. Also, if you know how you're able to revise and work best e.g. are you a visual or auditory learner etc. then you'll be able to tailor your revision to suit your learning style better which will help you to recall information in the long-run
Lastly, although you want to achieve high grades and it's great to have goals to work towards, please don't feel pressured and as though you need to achieve them! You're doing amazing as you are and regardless of your grade, you're sure to end up with a job you enjoy! Grades definitely aren't everything either, and getting some work experience or shadowing is brilliant for CVs and job interviews in the future so it's worth looking into as it'll set you apart from the crowd
I hope you find this useful and enjoy the rest of your university experience!!!
Best wishes,
Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by University of Suffolk student)
Hi Anonymous I'm glad to hear that everything's going great with your course and that you're aiming for high grades! I'd say from personal experience and talking to others, that being able to apply the content and talk about it in discussions and essays will really help you to learn the information and achieve high grades.
I feel like becoming familiar with the assignment brief is also an easy way to pick up marks as you'll know what you need to write about in order to get the high marks. If you're ever unsure of anything, your lecturers are there to help and answer any questions you have about the topic or the assignment brief! Maybe asking the previous years if they have any tips or revision resources that you can borrow might be a good idea too as they've completed the essays before and know what the marking criteria is. Also, if you know how you're able to revise and work best e.g. are you a visual or auditory learner etc. then you'll be able to tailor your revision to suit your learning style better which will help you to recall information in the long-run
Lastly, although you want to achieve high grades and it's great to have goals to work towards, please don't feel pressured and as though you need to achieve them! You're doing amazing as you are and regardless of your grade, you're sure to end up with a job you enjoy! Grades definitely aren't everything either, and getting some work experience or shadowing is brilliant for CVs and job interviews in the future so it's worth looking into as it'll set you apart from the crowd
I hope you find this useful and enjoy the rest of your university experience!!!
Best wishes,
Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
Thank you so much for the tips! I really appreciate it 💛
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Thisismyunitsr
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Don’t procrastinate. I aware that it sounds simple but you’ll be surprised how many people do and how much long term stress it causes.
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artful_lounger
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To be honest what I've heard from others, and like the above, is that those who just approach it as a 9-5 job - getting up consistently and regularly and going to campus in the morning to study, and staying until the end of the day, and just going to lectures between studying and working on your assessments etc, tend to do best. They will be better prepared for tutorials/seminars etc, have done not just the minimum reading but the additional reading reasonably expected for a student to get good marks, and will have plenty of time to work on their assignments and prepare for exams etc. Note that this is actually just the general expectation for full time students - that they will spend 30-40 hours a week on their course, including timetabled hours. A lot of people just go to their timetabled hours and do work as and when needed only and end up falling behind as a result, or aren't as well prepared.

This also enables them to "switch off" at the end of the day because they know they've done the work they needed to which might also improve your quality of life. I've found that, since I procrastinate constantly, I always end up feeling guilty when I do anything that isn't my academic work because I know I'm just putting it off until the last minute. It's only the days where I make a point of trying to work consistently (or semi-consistently e.g. doing an hour of academic stuff, an hour of whatever I want, and so on back and forth until I finish the work) that I don't get in that mindset :P

Generally though probably having any kind of consistent daily routine with respect to your academic work would suffice; a 9-5 one is probably most convenient to ensure you get to all your timetabled activities and can make use of campus services as they are available. If you're distance studying, a part-time student, or have other commitments, then you may be able to (and indeed, may need to) alter exactly how you approach things in that way. But if you are able to do something productive every day for your course (i.e. outside of attending lectures and other timetabled activities), you're probably already ahead of a fair few students!
Last edited by artful_lounger; 3 weeks ago
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martin7
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#7
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm a second year politics student and I would like to achieve high grades this year and next year...what are the key tips to get a first class in essays or overall?
The first thing is to understand what the criteria are for a piece of work to be worthy of first class marks. You need to go beyond simply regurgitating what you're taught in lectures.

Bristol has an example of "Generic Marking Criteria" where you can see clearly the sort of level you'd need to be at to get marks of 70+; see TABLE 1 at http://www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-qu...king-criteria/

Your own university may have a similar sort of scale for its own use, but I suspect it would be similar to Bristol's.

The other thing to do is the get feedback on your work once it's been marked; the question you need to ask is "what could I have done to make this better". Then use the insights you've gained to improve your next piece of work.
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