Year 13 Desperately need help with revision techniques.

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XpertShadow
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#1
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#1
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
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Shimmeringorbs
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#2
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#2
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
You'd be best off asking your qualified teachers, whose job it is to tell you these things, rather than asking random people on TSR what specifically works for each individual of them. Your teachers know you, your strengths and weaknesses and how you work.

At lunch or after school you should go and ask them. What works for a certain TSR user probably isn't going to work for you; if you try it and then fail spectacularly at it, that's a lot of wasted time and energy right there.
Last edited by Shimmeringorbs; 2 weeks ago
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Pika132
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#3
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#3
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
i do sociology and psych as well best way would be doing exam question espcially both are essay subjects and go over the sociologiests for each topic and same for psychologists
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helooooooojrru
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I don't take any of these subjects but what has helped me and a lot of my friends is making question cards out of the information, I take biology so for example instead of me writing about the red blood cell , I would put on one side of the flashcard how is a red cell adapted to its function or what features does a red blood cell have.
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XpertShadow
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Shimmeringorbs)
You'd be best off asking your qualified teachers, whose job it is to tell you these things, rather than asking random people on TSR what specifically works for each individual of them. Your teachers know you, your strengths and weaknesses and how you work.

At lunch or after school you should go and ask them. What works for a certain TSR user probably isn't going to work for you; if you try it and then fail spectacularly at it, that's a lot of wasted time and energy right there.
I'll ask my teachers the next time I see them. That's true, thank you
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XpertShadow
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#6
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#6
(Original post by helooooooojrru)
I don't take any of these subjects but what has helped me and a lot of my friends is making question cards out of the information, I take biology so for example instead of me writing about the red blood cell , I would put on one side of the flashcard how is a red cell adapted to its function or what features does a red blood cell have.
This sounds like it might just work for me if I'm honest, especially since I can find questions relating to each subtopic for sociology. Ill give it a try now Thanks man.
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XpertShadow
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Pika132)
i do sociology and psych as well best way would be doing exam question espcially both are essay subjects and go over the sociologiests for each topic and same for psychologists
I thought about doing exam questions, but I would need to look at information in order to answer them tbh. I reckon if i go over the knowledge by doing question cards that @helooooooojrru mentioned then doing exam questions id be best off. Many thanks
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Pika132
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#8
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#8
(Original post by XpertShadow)
I thought about doing exam questions, but I would need to look at information in order to answer them tbh. I reckon if i go over the knowledge by doing question cards that @helooooooojrru mentioned then doing exam questions id be best off. Many thanks
ah ok good luck
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SB1234567890
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#9
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#9
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
I did A levels last year and did the exact same subjects as you (all AQA)

For psychology I turned each topic/bullet point in the specification into an essay then turned essay into quizlet cards, which I tested myself on regularly
Also, for research methods, past papers are best for learning the style of questioning and for biopstcgology I found it really useful to print off the diagrams and turn them into flashcards
If I found that there were certain areas that I was less confident on, I would turn them into flashcards

For sociology, I also made quizlets
I then starred the facts/sociologists that I wanted to try to commit to memory
I then tested myself on the quizlet regularly then once I was confident on the quizlet I would do blurting to see if I could recall the content without prompts
I would then look back to the quizlet and add in a different colour the content that I forgot
If I kept forgetting certain content I would turn it into mind maps
Nearer exams I would practice essays and past paper questions

For business, I would turn the specification into notes
I would then combine this into powerpoints and turn this into quizlets
When I often forgot answers to the quizlets I would turn this into posters
I would also do lots of past paper questions to practice the technique

If I did any practice questions, I would always ask my teacher to mark it so that I could improve

Hope this helps and I'm happy to answer any questions you have at any point
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Black_Beast007
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Shimmeringorbs)
You'd be best off asking your qualified teachers, whose job it is to tell you these things, rather than asking random people on TSR what specifically works for each individual of them. Your teachers know you, your strengths and weaknesses and how you work.

At lunch or after school you should go and ask them. What works for a certain TSR user probably isn't going to work for you; if you try it and then fail spectacularly at it, that's a lot of wasted time and energy right th
Cornell note taking helps with memory or with me I remember most when i have one song on repeat for one topic kinda thing.
Hope this helps a bit
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XpertShadow
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#11
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#11
(Original post by SB1234567890)
I did A levels last year and did the exact same subjects as you (all AQA)

For psychology I turned each topic/bullet point in the specification into an essay then turned essay into quizlet cards, which I tested myself on regularly
Also, for research methods, past papers are best for learning the style of questioning and for biopstcgology I found it really useful to print off the diagrams and turn them into flashcards
If I found that there were certain areas that I was less confident on, I would turn them into flashcards

For sociology, I also made quizlets
I then starred the facts/sociologists that I wanted to try to commit to memory
I then tested myself on the quizlet regularly then once I was confident on the quizlet I would do blurting to see if I could recall the content without prompts
I would then look back to the quizlet and add in a different colour the content that I forgot
If I kept forgetting certain content I would turn it into mind maps
Nearer exams I would practice essays and past paper questions

For business, I would turn the specification into notes
I would then combine this into powerpoints and turn this into quizlets
When I often forgot answers to the quizlets I would turn this into posters
I would also do lots of past paper questions to practice the technique

If I did any practice questions, I would always ask my teacher to mark it so that I could improve

Hope this helps and I'm happy to answer any questions you have at any point
Haha what a coincidence.

I gave quizlet a try before, and didn't really think it was for me. I might have to try commit to it properly and see what happens
For business practicing technique would definitely help a lot, I'll get on doing questions more often.
For the powerpoints, quizlet may help, So ill give it a try over the next few days!
For soc, these question cards are looking like they are gonna work, as long as i revise them every now and then.

Thank you I haven't got any questions as of now, but if i do when i get started on the business quizlet ill let you know!#
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XpertShadow
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Black_Beast007)
Cornell note taking helps with memory or with me I remember most when i have one song on repeat for one topic kinda thing.
Hope this helps a bit
To be honest i gave cornell method a try before, and didnt't really think it was for me. Wasnt a huge fan of the layout.

Imight have to give listening to 1 song a try at a later time, Cheers!
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Ralph1977
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#13
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#13
What I found helped was writing an essay eg compare n contrast psychodynamic theory and social psychological theory of development. Just make it 2.5 sides of a4 no more then read, shorten into bullet points and commit to memory whilst having recorded myself reading the full essay on a dictaphone, in order to commit to memory.
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1jasmine
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#14
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#14
I do maths chemistry biology but I’m sure these revision techniques are transferable. I do something called “blurting” where I take a piece of paper and write down everything I know about a topic. E.g - I will write everything about the nervous system that I know from memory. Afterwards I’ll use my notes and textbook and fill in the gaps IN A DIFFERENT COLOUR. then over time carry on doing it until there is no more different colour. This makes sure that you know everything from your own memory without needing a trigger from your notes.
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sharde2004
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#15
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#15
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
Okay so i’m studying philosophy-ethics, history and criminology, and this technique that i thought of 110% works for me as i got to remember 101 names, so if u struggle with names this might help…
Basically, just associate a character to a name. It’s obviously better if you know the show personally. For example, I have to know Plato and Aristotle and their theologies, for Philosophy. That being said, i associated plato with sonic the hedgehog, and associated aristotle with shadow the hedgehog.
It just made sense to do that because both the pairs naturally oppose each other. hope it helps.
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A_sophophile
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#16
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#16
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I really am not sure on how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't really efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't really see how that would help, as my knowledge to start off isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time.

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
Hey XpertShadow

I'd suggest you explore what kind of a learner you are - visual, auditory, reading-writing, kinesthetic. Figuring out a way to revise would be much simpler once your learning style is clear.
For me, a relational chart or revising point-wise notes has proven to be well suited. I've thought of exploring mindmaps too, but haven't yet. Let me know how it works out, if you happen to try it.
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A_sophophile
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#17
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#17
(Original post by XpertShadow)
Right so, I take Sociology, Business and Psychology. I am not sure how to revise, for AS, I would just make notes by writing and rereading them, but that wasn't efficient as it would take a lot of time to write, and then when it came to the exam I couldn't remember most of the information.

What would I be best doing? I suffer from pretty bad memory, so most of my knowledge for Year12/ start of year 13 is pretty bad, although I can remember certain ideas/ theories etc...

I thought about making mindmaps, but didn't see how that would help, as my knowledge to start isn't as good as it should be. I started AS with really good grades, specifically in Sociology but that dropped down as the year progressed.

Would answering exam-style questions with a revision guide/class notes help me? Or would that just be a waste of time?

Has anyone got any ideas/techniques that would hopefully work for me?
Hey XpertShadow
I'd suggest you first explore your preferred learning style - visual, auditory, reading-writing or kinesthetic. Figuring out a suitable way to learn would be much simpler once your learning style is clear.

For me, relational charts and point-wise notes have worked out the best. I've thought of mind maps too, but haven't reached on to those. Let me know if they work out for you.
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Trumbles
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#18
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#18
Some good ways have been suggested. In general I'd say that the main point is that whatever method you use, it needs to be one which forces your brain to engage with the material. That is to find ways to categorise it and recall some relevant bits and not others in different orders and contexts.

Writing notes and reading them back is notoriously bad for that because copying down sentences and then running your eyes back over them can be done using very little brainpower, leaving most of your cortex to switch off or replay your favourite bits of Rick and Morty.

One effective, if time-consuming, method is to make up your own exam questions complete with mark schemes, especially with 5 or 6 mark questions. Coming up with the questions forces your brain to process the material more deeply and then you have the questions to test yourself back with.

Lots of other things can work though. If you read notes thinking about how you could reorganise the information to put them in a mind-map (and then put the notes aside before creating the mind-map) that will be much more effective at engaging your brain than reading alone. Having the mind-map at the end as a reminder is just a bonus.

Whatever method(s) you use, unless this is a last minute cram, you will start forgetting at least some of the information within a day or two if you don't revisit the topic. Use Spaced Repetition to Flatten your Forgetting Curve (in the jargon ). Trying to recall your mind-map or answer your own questions will help. Of course doing someone else's questions as well will add a different dimension to it.
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XpertShadow
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Ralph1977)
What I found helped was writing an essay eg compare n contrast psychodynamic theory and social psychological theory of development. Just make it 2.5 sides of a4 no more then read, shorten into bullet points and commit to memory whilst having recorded myself reading the full essay on a dictaphone, in order to commit to memory.
I dont really think auditory learning works for me - with things such as videos i struggle to focus. However rereading after writing/ question cards and such appears to be working!
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XpertShadow
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#20
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#20
(Original post by 1jasmine)
I do maths chemistry biology but I’m sure these revision techniques are transferable. I do something called “blurting” where I take a piece of paper and write down everything I know about a topic. E.g - I will write everything about the nervous system that I know from memory. Afterwards I’ll use my notes and textbook and fill in the gaps IN A DIFFERENT COLOUR. then over time carry on doing it until there is no more different colour. This makes sure that you know everything from your own memory without needing a trigger from your notes.
aha that might be a shout but i dont really remember anything- id have to rewrite all of it in note foremat
:skullandcrossbones:
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