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University degree

I am very confused. I currently do English, Psychology and Biology and i need some much needed advice and guidance as to what degree i want to do. The UCAS deadlines is edging closer and I’m so stressed. I’m more of a humanities person, I’m good at English and Psychology but Biology is my weak point. But i want to do it at uni but the job prospects scare me. i don’t have any idea of what jobs i want to do, i just want enough money to be comfortable. Any advice is very appreciated x

Everyone says psych (I’ve scanned the student room over and over) won’t get you jobs, biology is apparently super hard with maths, English I’m not interested beyond a level (tho I am good at it)
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by GSCE student
I am very confused. I currently do English, Psychology and Biology and i need some much needed advice and guidance as to what degree i want to do. The UCAS deadlines is edging closer and I’m so stressed. I’m more of a humanities person, I’m good at English and Psychology but Biology is my weak point. But i want to do it at uni but the job prospects scare me. i don’t have any idea of what jobs i want to do, i just want enough money to be comfortable. Any advice is very appreciated x

Hey it sounds like you are well rounded and everything. Ifni was you. Just me personally I'd do primary education. Maybe you don't want to be a teacher. But but hear me out in primary education you learn about all the subjects in the curriculum. Its primary so teaching the foundations and cores of subjects. It is fun to work with children although they can be temperamental haha but if you have patience then it is really rewarding. Many jobs in the field of primary teaching and job security. Plus you get to be creative and fun wuth lessons. That's only my advice in things.
Not all degrees lead to an obvious vocational career (ie. Nursing, Law, Accountancy etc) - but all degrees will add value and make you more employable - this is why you will see job adverts that say 'Wanted graduate - any discipline'. Its the 'higher thinking skills' that employers want - not the specific subject knowledge. So, dont worry if your chosen degree subject is a Humanities or Social Science subject, once you graduate you will have higher earning potential than a non-graduate.

Have a look down this list of degree subjects at Sussex - https://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/
includes lots of subjects you might not have heard of and many do not have any specific A level subject requirements, just grades.
American Studies, Anthropology, English, Geography, International Relations, Law, Liberal Arts, Media Studies, Politics, Sociology, Social Work etc etc.

And btw, nowhere does it say you can only apply to Uni straight from school - many people take a planned gap year in order to have a break from education and time to think about what they want to do next. Recommended if you are feeling a bit confused about the way forward.
Original post by Kentinho99
Hey it sounds like you are well rounded and everything. Ifni was you. Just me personally I'd do primary education. Maybe you don't want to be a teacher. But but hear me out in primary education you learn about all the subjects in the curriculum. Its primary so teaching the foundations and cores of subjects. It is fun to work with children although they can be temperamental haha but if you have patience then it is really rewarding. Many jobs in the field of primary teaching and job security. Plus you get to be creative and fun wuth lessons. That's only my advice in things.

I like working with children, but as a career choice I’m less inclined. Maybe after in the future but for now I want something that would please my parents. I know I’m sounding very picky but that’s why I need advice :frown: but thank you regardless
Original post by McGinger
Not all degrees lead to an obvious vocational career (ie. Nursing, Law, Accountancy etc) - but all degrees will add value and make you more employable - this is why you will see job adverts that say 'Wanted graduate - any discipline'. Its the 'higher thinking skills' that employers want - not the specific subject knowledge. So, dont worry if your chosen degree subject is a Humanities or Social Science subject, once you graduate you will have higher earning potential than a non-graduate.

Have a look down this list of degree subjects at Sussex - https://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/
includes lots of subjects you might not have heard of and many do not have any specific A level subject requirements, just grades.
American Studies, Anthropology, English, Geography, International Relations, Law, Liberal Arts, Media Studies, Politics, Sociology, Social Work etc etc.

And btw, nowhere does it say you can only apply to Uni straight from school - many people take a planned gap year in order to have a break from education and time to think about what they want to do next. Recommended if you are feeling a bit confused about the way forward.

My mum would hate me if I took a gap year :’) (I come from a strict family). But what you’re saying makes sense. I’m thinking of joint psych and bio? Or psych and neuroscience? Do u have any take on that?
Original post by GSCE student
My mum would hate me if I took a gap year :’) (I come from a strict family). But what you’re saying makes sense. I’m thinking of joint psych and bio? Or psych and neuroscience? Do u have any take on that?

Just make sure that any joint subject Psych degree is accredited by the BPS - this matters if you do decide to use that aspect of your degree later : https://www.bps.org.uk/public/become-psychologist/accredited-courses
Original post by GSCE student
I am very confused. I currently do English, Psychology and Biology and i need some much needed advice and guidance as to what degree i want to do. The UCAS deadlines is edging closer and I’m so stressed. I’m more of a humanities person, I’m good at English and Psychology but Biology is my weak point. But i want to do it at uni but the job prospects scare me. i don’t have any idea of what jobs i want to do, i just want enough money to be comfortable. Any advice is very appreciated x

Everyone says psych (I’ve scanned the student room over and over) won’t get you jobs, biology is apparently super hard with maths, English I’m not interested beyond a level (tho I am good at it)

Hi there,

Choosing a degree is definitely a hard decision, especially when you're not sure which career pathway you'd like to go down. As mentioned on this thread already, a primary education degree is definitely a good choice - maybe I'm a little biased as I'm in my third year of one. But it is definitely a good degree with a wide range of subjects. I've popped a link at the bottom of my answer to show you the types of modules we learn on the course at CU Scarborough. You've also mentioned about doing psychology but worried about the jobs aspect. My university offer an Applied Psychology degree (which I've also linked) and it is accredited by the BPS. This means it meets the high quality standards required for education and training. When you have completed your degree, it allows a clear route to Society membership and the full range of benefits for professional development: services, publications, conferences, as well as networking and training opportunities. You can also look under the 'employabilty' tab on the link and you can read a bit more about the types of roles you can enter after - or you could go on to study a masters/doctorate!

If you have any more questions, please let me know!

Mel :smile:

Primary Education: https://www.coventry.ac.uk/cus/course-structure/hnc-hnd-degree/primary-education/?term=2022-23
Applied Psychology: https://www.coventry.ac.uk/cus/course-structure/hnc-hnd-degree/applied-psychology/?term=2022-23
Hi thats really helpful, thank you. But what's the difference between applied psych and psych on its own? Actually I'm considering psych and neuroscience joint honours. Do you think that's a good route?
Original post by GSCE student
Hi thats really helpful, thank you. But what's the difference between applied psych and psych on its own? Actually I'm considering psych and neuroscience joint honours. Do you think that's a good route?

Hi @GSCE student,

I unfortunately would not be able to advise you on whether a joint honours psych/neuroscience degree is the correct route as it is not in line with my current degree. I wouldn't want to give you any false information. In terms of the difference between Applied Psychology compared to Psychology - a psychology degree has a major focus on theory, fundamental understandings of principles and psychological methods. However, an applied psychology degree has a deeper focus on how the theory you learn is put into practice in real-life situations, for example therapy and other practical solutions to human and animal behaviours and experiences.

Applied psychology places particular emphasis on its application in real-life and clinical contexts. The vocational modules on offer at CU Scarborough allow you to understand how the key theories of psychology are applied in the professional context, and the course explores the use of psychology in areas such as health, education, sport, forensic, clinical and the law. This allows you to learn about psychology in practice from different perspectives. The opportunities to gain real world exposure will also be developed across the course through engagement with a variety of psychologists from different fields.

I hope this provides a little bit more clarity, but please let me know if you need any further help - Mel :smile:

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